Follow-up on why SF gets you the correct lead

Follow-up on why SF gets you the correct lead

Post by Ocean of Nuanc » Fri, 12 Oct 2007 22:35:59


Here's the technicalities written by a known quantity on the UD forum...

-------------

"Also, you want to ask for a canter depart from shoulder-fore positioning.
Why? Because it moves the horse's ribcage away from your inside leg, and
your outside leg contains the slight bend/positioning, so that the outside
hind is now easily ready to strike off and the shoulders are straight. If
you can accomplish that, then the only h/h pulsing you will feel the need to
do is on the outside rein, as the outside hind touches down (as the mane
flies upward)."  -- pammy

--------------

sharon

 
 
 

Follow-up on why SF gets you the correct lead

Post by pinefall.ly.. » Sat, 13 Oct 2007 00:05:08

A nice summary. I never actually thought about this in words, but I
have been thinking/doing with a number of horses. I think the key is
"the shoulders are straight". This is also why when I have trouble
with a lead, I may think/do leg yield for a stride or so to help set
up the depart aka get straight!

Lynne in NC

 
 
 

Follow-up on why SF gets you the correct lead

Post by Ocean of Nuanc » Sat, 13 Oct 2007 00:22:39


|A nice summary. I never actually thought about this in words, but I
| have been thinking/doing with a number of horses. I think the key is
| "the shoulders are straight". This is also why when I have trouble
| with a lead, I may think/do leg yield for a stride or so to help set
| up the depart aka get straight!

That and because LY gets the horse into the outside rein.  World peace
requires being in the outside rein.  : )

What are you working on in your riding with your wonderful instructor?  : )

sharon

 
 
 

Follow-up on why SF gets you the correct lead

Post by Emily Brook » Sat, 13 Oct 2007 00:40:30



Quote:
> Here's the technicalities written by a known quantity on the UD forum...

> -------------

> "Also, you want to ask for a canter depart from shoulder-fore positioning.
> Why? Because it moves the horse's ribcage away from your inside leg, and
> your outside leg contains the slight bend/positioning, so that the outside
> hind is now easily ready to strike off and the shoulders are straight. If
> you can accomplish that, then the only h/h pulsing you will feel the need
> to
> do is on the outside rein, as the outside hind touches down (as the mane
> flies upward)."  -- pammy

> --------------

> sharon

Much better wording than my re-phrasing of what my instructor told me about
this, as we discussed in email.

Straight is the key. To a lot of things equestrian.

Emily

 
 
 

Follow-up on why SF gets you the correct lead

Post by pinefall.ly.. » Sat, 13 Oct 2007 00:44:20



Quote:
> That and because LY gets the horse into the outside rein.  World peace
> requires being in the outside rein.  : )

Again, I don't think about it, but I feel it! I wish world peace could
be achieved so easily.

Quote:
> What are you working on in your riding with your wonderful instructor?  : )

Well, I have the luxury of *two* wonderful instructors at the moment:
A very well schooled gentleman of a horse + my instructor. It is a
real treat for me to ride a schoolmaster after a number of project
horses. I feel very in touch with how much I need to improve!  A few
things in progress: Exorcising my bad fake hunter canter habits and
getting more clear in achieving/feeling correct lateral movements---
SI, travers, renvers. Also, I'm working on just sitting well. My
horsey teacher has a more challenging trot than many I've ridden.

My big homework has been lots of no stirrup work, especially in
posting trot and canter (and t-c-t work). It really helps me to
establish my seat/placement of sit bones and release my leg.

Lynne in NC

 
 
 

Follow-up on why SF gets you the correct lead

Post by Ocean of Nuanc » Sat, 13 Oct 2007 00:46:17


|


| > Here's the technicalities written by a known quantity on the UD forum...
| >
| > -------------
| >
| > "Also, you want to ask for a canter depart from shoulder-fore
positioning.
| > Why? Because it moves the horse's ribcage away from your inside leg, and
| > your outside leg contains the slight bend/positioning, so that the
outside
| > hind is now easily ready to strike off and the shoulders are straight.
If
| > you can accomplish that, then the only h/h pulsing you will feel the
need
| > to
| > do is on the outside rein, as the outside hind touches down (as the mane
| > flies upward)."  -- pammy
| >
| > --------------
| >
| >
| > sharon
| >
|
| Much better wording than my re-phrasing of what my instructor told me
about
| this, as we discussed in email.
|
| Straight is the key. To a lot of things equestrian.

Straight is the linchpin to world peace.

sharon

 
 
 

Follow-up on why SF gets you the correct lead

Post by Ocean of Nuanc » Sat, 13 Oct 2007 00:55:22

(snip interesting lessoning report)

| My big homework has been lots of no stirrup work, especially in
| posting trot and canter (and t-c-t work). It really helps me to
| establish my seat/placement of sit bones and release my leg.

One thing that has taught me how to plug in and evenly weight my seatbones
is to raise both legs away from the horse and ride around like that as long
as you can.  Pete's rehab requires a lot of certain work at walk and I take
that opportunity to work on my position as much as possible.  I have built
up top going around almost the entire ring with both legs (and thighs) off
the horse.  I couldn't hold it for more than a few seconds when I first
tried it.  It, more than anything, makes it clear if the seatbones are
correctly placed and weighted IME.

I can do it a little at trot but I lose my balance because I have to post
all the time for Pete.  When Pete builds back to a point where I can sit
some, I'm going to do the leg off thing as much as possible.

And on a hopeful note, Pete has figured out how to trot over a raised
cavelletti (set at the lowest position).  He is pushing from his haunches,
powering and lifting over it now.  So now I can move myself from Orange Bus
Undercarriage Alert to Yellow.  : )

sharon

 
 
 

Follow-up on why SF gets you the correct lead

Post by pinefall.ly.. » Sat, 13 Oct 2007 01:26:09



Quote:
> One thing that has taught me how to plug in and evenly weight my seatbones
> is to raise both legs away from the horse and ride around like that as long
> as you can.

The joy of a working with a steadier older horse is that I get to
enjoy a nice warm up for me, too. What you've described is a good
exercise, but for me I get even more from the no stirrups posting
work. It just makes me get aligned all the way through my body.
Probably I also get less "grippy" in the hips/groins with the posting,
while it can be a challenge for me to keep a feeling of ease in the
hips when I cruise around with the legs off. My instructor is very big
on having me "do the bicycycle" at trot + canter on the lunge---this
exercise is similar in emphasizing the sit bone placement (and the use
of the core for stability).

Quote:
> So now I can move myself from Orange Bus
> Undercarriage Alert to Yellow.  : )

Glad to hear all the good news.

Lynne in NC

 
 
 

Follow-up on why SF gets you the correct lead

Post by Terry von Geas » Sat, 13 Oct 2007 07:00:33



Quote:
> Here's the technicalities written by a known quantity on the UD forum...

> -------------

> "Also, you want to ask for a canter depart from shoulder-fore positioning.
> Why? Because it moves the horse's ribcage away from your inside leg, and
> your outside leg contains the slight bend/positioning, so that the outside
> hind is now easily ready to strike off and the shoulders are straight. If
> you can accomplish that, then the only h/h pulsing you will feel the need
> to
> do is on the outside rein, as the outside hind touches down (as the mane
> flies upward)."  -- pammy

Or you can tickle the outside rein and gently nudge with your outside leg.
The horse picks up the correct lead or falls over. But then that's not a
full paragraph of bullshit for which much money might be charged, is it?

Horses is horses and riding is riding.

--
Terry

  "I said I never had much use for one,
   I never said I didn't know how to use one."
    M. Quigley

 
 
 

Follow-up on why SF gets you the correct lead

Post by Ocean of Nuanc » Sat, 13 Oct 2007 07:01:39



|


| > Here's the technicalities written by a known quantity on the UD forum...
| >
| > -------------
| >
| > "Also, you want to ask for a canter depart from shoulder-fore
positioning.
| > Why? Because it moves the horse's ribcage away from your inside leg, and
| > your outside leg contains the slight bend/positioning, so that the
outside
| > hind is now easily ready to strike off and the shoulders are straight.
If
| > you can accomplish that, then the only h/h pulsing you will feel the
need
| > to
| > do is on the outside rein, as the outside hind touches down (as the mane
| > flies upward)."  -- pammy
|
|
| Or you can tickle the outside rein and gently nudge with your outside leg.
| The horse picks up the correct lead or falls over. But then that's not a
| full paragraph of bullshit for which much money might be charged, is it?
|
| Horses is horses and riding is riding.

Hey, did you hear that Walter Zettl has apparently told the Parelli's that
they are the only two people in the world he will be teaching?

sharon

 
 
 

Follow-up on why SF gets you the correct lead

Post by Sue Leopo » Sat, 13 Oct 2007 08:07:11


Quote:
>> One thing that has taught me how to plug in and evenly weight my
seatbones
> is to raise both legs away from the horse and ride around like that as long
> as you can.  Pete's rehab requires a lot of certain work at walk and I take

Ow, ow, ow. I remember doing that. And also some sort of torture
involving riding with one stirrup. Oh yeah, Abby recommends
that. I have done it and by golly if you are crooked it works a
treat.

Quote:
> that opportunity to work on my position as much as possible.  I have built
> up top going around almost the entire ring with both legs (and thighs) off
> the horse.  I couldn't hold it for more than a few seconds when I first
> tried it.  It, more than anything, makes it clear if the seatbones are
> correctly placed and weighted IME.

OK, now drop one stirrup. To make it harder, drop the inside
stirrup. Are you even? Are you straight? Is your horse still
on the outside rein or is he falling on his inside shoulder?

Quote:
> I can do it a little at trot but I lose my balance because I have to post
> all the time for Pete.  When Pete builds back to a point where I can sit
> some, I'm going to do the leg off thing as much as possible.

Good exercise.

Quote:
> And on a hopeful note, Pete has figured out how to trot over a raised
> cavelletti (set at the lowest position).  He is pushing from his haunches,
> powering and lifting over it now.  So now I can move myself from Orange Bus
> Undercarriage Alert to Yellow.  : )

Raised cavelletti rule. For every horse. They teach them to lift from
their abs and back, they teach them to be careful where they
place their feet, they teach all sort of lessons.

When raised cavelletti are easy, ask your rehab trainer about
doing a little jumping with the Pancake. It is *very* good for
dressage horses and, IMO, a little light jumping improves
the canter. Gives it more jump and elevation. Plus it's fun.
:-) Fun is *very* important.

Sue, thinks jumping is a useful exercise for almost every horse

Quote:

> sharon

 
 
 

Follow-up on why SF gets you the correct lead

Post by Ocean of Nuanc » Sat, 13 Oct 2007 08:28:43


(snip)

| When raised cavelletti are easy, ask your rehab trainer about
| doing a little jumping with the Pancake. It is *very* good for
| dressage horses and, IMO, a little light jumping improves
| the canter. Gives it more jump and elevation. Plus it's fun.
| :-) Fun is *very* important.
|
| Sue, thinks jumping is a useful exercise for almost every horse

I wouldn't be surprised if she suggested it... she is an eventer.

I have learned so much about rehab already from her.  I'll try anything she
suggests.  She is batting 1000 with Pancake.

sharon

 
 
 

Follow-up on why SF gets you the correct lead

Post by Terry von Geas » Sat, 13 Oct 2007 08:55:07



Quote:



> |


> | > Here's the technicalities written by a known quantity on the UD
> forum...
> | >
> | > -------------
> | >
> | > "Also, you want to ask for a canter depart from shoulder-fore
> positioning.
> | > Why? Because it moves the horse's ribcage away from your inside leg,
> and
> | > your outside leg contains the slight bend/positioning, so that the
> outside
> | > hind is now easily ready to strike off and the shoulders are straight.
> If
> | > you can accomplish that, then the only h/h pulsing you will feel the
> need
> | > to
> | > do is on the outside rein, as the outside hind touches down (as the
> mane
> | > flies upward)."  -- pammy
> |
> |
> | Or you can tickle the outside rein and gently nudge with your outside
> leg.
> | The horse picks up the correct lead or falls over. But then that's not a
> | full paragraph of bullshit for which much money might be charged, is it?
> |
> | Horses is horses and riding is riding.

> Hey, did you hear that Walter Zettl has apparently told the Parelli's that
> they are the only two people in the world he will be teaching?

We were laboring under the impression that they think already know
everything. Besides, who or what is a Walter Zettl? Apparently some being
that knows more than the Parelli tribe. Not a long reach.

--
Terry

  "I said I never had much use for one,
   I never said I didn't know how to use one."
    M. Quigley

 
 
 

Follow-up on why SF gets you the correct lead

Post by Ocean of Nuanc » Sat, 13 Oct 2007 09:07:21



|

(snip)

| > Hey, did you hear that Walter Zettl has apparently told the Parelli's
that
| > they are the only two people in the world he will be teaching?
|
|
| We were laboring under the impression that they think already know
| everything. Besides, who or what is a Walter Zettl? Apparently some being
| that knows more than the Parelli tribe. Not a long reach.

LOL!

Thanks.

Apparently, Zettl, a German BNT who has a full clinic dance card, is
throwing all that away to spend the rest of his life teaching ONLY Pat and
Linda Parelli...

"We've run into a grand master of dressage. A master of lightness and
politeness. His name is Walter Zettl and he's a wonderful, gentle old man.
And he only teaches two people in the world. He's made a commitment for the
rest of his life to only teach Pat and Linda. Because he's searched all over
the world and he's never found--he's finally found what he was looking for.
Someone who uses lightness and politeness, and love, language, leadership.
He'd been looking for it and he'd been doing it, but he'd never found a
kindred situation. And this man knows what it takes to have the lighteness
and politeness. He doesn't know too much about our methodology--or
didn't--but now he does because he's been studying it like crazy..."

(after a post on UD by rudy)

I've also heard Pat's horse thinks both Parelli and his wife are a "couple
of coconuts."

Do you think the Parelli's are a couple of coconuts?

sharon

--
(of a picture of Pat Parelli and his wife) "I love the look in PP's horse's
eye as if he wants to scream:  'What a couple of coconuts.'" -- oldermaretnu

(of the Parelli's) "I need to clarify something important! I do NOT watch
the P's, I was merely flipping channels when I heard them say this. Honest.
Please believe me." -- Dapple Field

 
 
 

Follow-up on why SF gets you the correct lead

Post by Bill Kambi » Sat, 13 Oct 2007 09:17:27

On Thu, 11 Oct 2007 20:07:21 -0400, "Ocean of Nuance"

Quote:

>Do you think the Parelli's are a couple of coconuts?

I dunno, but there's an old Aussie song entitled "I've Got A Lovely
Bunch Of Coconuts."  My Aussie friends tell me it's a serious double
entendre. ;-)