losing power at night while riding in the indoor

losing power at night while riding in the indoor

Post by Lisa Coo » Mon, 01 Jan 2007 10:59:18


Of all the innumerable ways of potential horse accidents, I had never once
given consideration to the fact that I ride at night in an indoor, and there
is no emergency lighting for when power goes out.  Until tonight.

Fortunately, I was just trotting along on Linus when WHAM!  A transformer
blew on the street, right next to the barn's driveway.  One moment, trotting
under the lights, next moment PITCH dark!  Ack!  I gave an immediate "whoa"
and got off.  Linus, bless his heart, is a very easy going 5 year old, and
didn't so much as take a step until I asked him to.  Although I could tell
that his head had shot up in alarm.  And when Linus shoots that head up, it
is WAY the heck on up there.  :-)

Anyway, I managed to get him down the pitch dark aisle and into his pitch
dark stall, and then I went and got my truck and positioned it with the
headlights pointing down the aisle so I could everything properly away.

The horses are, obviously, used to being in a dark barn, but their reaction
to the power suddenly cut was interesting.  They were all very nervous when
the power went out.  Lots of alarmed snorts all up & down the aisleway,
accompanied by pacing and banging.  They never act like that when we simply
turn the lights off at night.

Anyway, big pats for Linus tonight.  He was super good and never put a foot
wrong.  BUT...BUT...I had set jumps up and was in the middle of an unusually
long warm up tonight before jumping.  The thought of the power going out
like that when we could have been cantering  down to a jump is very
frightening.

Lisa Cook
Brookline, NH

 
 
 

losing power at night while riding in the indoor

Post by Hunte » Mon, 01 Jan 2007 11:06:30



Quote:
>Fortunately, I was just trotting along on Linus when WHAM!  A transformer
>blew on the street, right next to the barn's driveway.

I am very familiar with that noise, it's like someone firing a .44
magnum next to you.

No wonder the horses were a bit nervous... I am totally impressed with
Linus... my horses would have not taken it so well.

Hunter

 
 
 

losing power at night while riding in the indoor

Post by Brian Whatcot » Mon, 01 Jan 2007 11:22:41



Quote:
> ///   ..I had set jumps up and was in the middle of an unusually
>long warm up tonight before jumping.  The thought of the power going out
>like that when we could have been cantering  down to a jump is very
>frightening.

>Lisa Cook
>Brookline, NH

Though automatic standby power is expensive and rarely instantaneous,
the sort of emergency lights you see in public venues, which look like
beefy battery lantern lights, are a much more practical proposition.

Such a light is held off by a mains powered relay, and comes on within
a second of line power failure, and stays on til the battery dies, or
the line power returns.

Given a reasonably handy man around the place, a line powered relay
from RadioShack for $2 or 3 and a meaty battery lamp could be rigged
as an emergency lamp (for non-statutary use) for pocket change.
     Obviously, this is not arena lighting, but a little pool of light
might make a difference?

Brian Whatcott    Altus OK  

 
 
 

losing power at night while riding in the indoor

Post by betse » Mon, 01 Jan 2007 11:28:35

 Brian actually has a decent idea.  A battery operated emergency light
will run about 50 or so bucks.  but, as a note of warning, it isn't a
"gentle light"...it's purpose is to provide light to get people out of
a building--ie, in case of fire and the power has been cut. so, the
lights can be pretty harsh and i imagine, cause a spook.  the lights
are battery powered, and tie into a source, if the power cuts out, they
go on instantly.  

very effective in a smoky building

betsey

 
 
 

losing power at night while riding in the indoor

Post by betse » Mon, 01 Jan 2007 11:30:32

Quote:

> Brian actually has a decent idea.  A battery operated emergency light
> will run about 50 or so bucks.  but, as a note of warning, it isn't a
> "gentle light"...it's purpose is to provide light to get people out of
> a building--ie, in case of fire and the power has been cut. so, the
> lights can be pretty harsh and i imagine, cause a spook.  the lights
> are battery powered, and tie into a source, if the power cuts out, they
> go on instantly.

> very effective in a smoky building

> betsey

here's a source...
http://www.lightworld.com/product.asp?id=2&product=13
 
 
 

losing power at night while riding in the indoor

Post by Don Brude » Mon, 01 Jan 2007 14:23:22



Quote:
> Anyway, big pats for Linus tonight.  He was super good and never put a foot
> wrong.  BUT...BUT...I had set jumps up and was in the middle of an unusually
> long warm up tonight before jumping.  The thought of the power going out
> like that when we could have been cantering  down to a jump is very
> frightening.

In a case like that, my thought would be pretty simple: Abort with a
"standard whoa" if possible, but be prepared to ride *THROUGH* the jump,
with absolutely no attempt to actually jump it if stopping turns into a
"not-an-option" concept.

Of course, this assumes you ARE practicing using completely "fall-apart"
capable jumps... As in "hit the bar, and it comes down - big fat hairy
non-issue deal", with no solid walls or similarly immovable objects?

That much having been said, it sounds like you need some emergency
lights in that arena - when the line power dies, they come on, running
on batteries. A couple of them, strategically placed, will at least give
enough light (however dim) to make out landmarks and such for a safe
exit.

--

or the subject of the message doesn't contain the exact text "PopperAndShadow"
somewhere, any message sent to this address will go in the garbage without my
ever knowing it arrived. Sorry... <http://www.sonic.net/~dakidd> for more info

 
 
 

losing power at night while riding in the indoor

Post by ponyr.. » Mon, 01 Jan 2007 15:36:18

Quote:

> Fortunately, I was just trotting along on Linus when WHAM!  A transformer
> blew on the street, right next to the barn's driveway.

That is so weird.  We were in Milford at the intersection of 13 and
101, and there was a BIG flash of light.  Jim thought there'd been a
major explosion.  The bank sign went out and immediately came back on,
and a couple street lights were out.  We considered lightening, but
didn't think it likely, and I suggested that maybe a transformer had
blown nearby.

But that was around 8:30, and I know your barn has lights out at 8:00.
And we weren't exactly nearby.  So I guess it's just a weird
coincidence.

I'm glad Linus was a good boy. :)

Nancy DeMarco
Mason, NH

 
 
 

losing power at night while riding in the indoor

Post by Jessica Jahie » Tue, 02 Jan 2007 01:36:40

: In a case like that, my thought would be pretty simple: Abort with a
: "standard whoa" if possible, but be prepared to ride *THROUGH* the jump,
: with absolutely no attempt to actually jump it if stopping turns into a
: "not-an-option" concept.

Or, depending on where you were relative to the jump, just jump it and
then "whoa" on a line. If the horse is no more than a few strides from the
jump, it may be safer to allow it to carry on. Chances are good that the
jump itself will be uneventful since the horse wouldn't be able to see
what it was jumping even if all the lights were still working - remember,
horses can't see the jump by the time they get to it. They take off blind
in any case, so "lights out" as they prepare to take off might not bother
them at all.

If you're ten strides from the jump when the lights go out, then stopping
would make more sense, and you would have more time to make and implement
that decision.

I can't really imagine a situation in which it would be appropriate to
attempt to run the horse through the jump. If you're jumping in an
arena in the dark, you're unlikely to welcome the sensation of standards,
poles, and jump cups flying in various directions.

I learned long ago that horses have much better night vision than humans,
and I'd keep that in mind as well.

Jessica

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losing power at night while riding in the indoor

Post by J. Z. M » Tue, 02 Jan 2007 04:35:54


Quote:

> That much having been said, it sounds like you need some emergency
> lights in that arena - when the line power dies, they come on, running
> on batteries. A couple of them, strategically placed, will at least give
> enough light (however dim) to make out landmarks and such for a safe
> exit

Yes, I had them installed on each corner of the arena for my new indoor.
The electrician also added some red lit exit signs on all doors for me, he
said I might as well have my place up to *business code* so if I ever went
commercial all would be in place.  I agreed that it sounded like a good
idea. These red exit signs are enough light in the dark to find your way out
of the building, they shine enough to see them from my house about 300ft
away. The emergency lighting is two spots at two people doors.  After your
post, I am glad I was talked into adding them. Thanks. :)

Jody

 
 
 

losing power at night while riding in the indoor

Post by Caela » Tue, 02 Jan 2007 06:54:06

Quote:

> Of all the innumerable ways of potential horse accidents, I had never once
> given consideration to the fact that I ride at night in an indoor, and there
> is no emergency lighting for when power goes out.  Until tonight.

> Fortunately, I was just trotting along on Linus when WHAM!  A transformer
> blew on the street, right next to the barn's driveway.  One moment, trotting
> under the lights, next moment PITCH dark!  Ack!  I gave an immediate "whoa"
> and got off.  Linus, bless his heart, is a very easy going 5 year old, and
> didn't so much as take a step until I asked him to.  Although I could tell
> that his head had shot up in alarm.  And when Linus shoots that head up, it
> is WAY the heck on up there.  :-)

(snip)

Thank you for posting this.

The place where I board has a new indoor arena and I don't think there
is any contingency for a lights out situation. The facility is situated
in a rural environment without any other ambient light other than
moonlight. If there were a power outage, it really would be pitch
black. We are a western/lesson barn and no one is jumping that I am
aware of, but there is a lesson program with smallish children and I
don't think being suddenly plunged into the heart of darkness would be
a good idea for any rider, experienced or not. My QH isn't really
spooky, but it's not an experiment I would want to try with him. I'll
print your post and show the BO. Luckily, her spouse is an electrician.
How handy is that!

 
 
 

losing power at night while riding in the indoor

Post by Jim Case » Tue, 02 Jan 2007 07:21:42

Quote:

> ... I don't think being suddenly plunged into the heart of darkness
> would be a good idea for any rider, experienced or not.

FWIW, I was in a group lesson once when the power failed, during a
thunderstorm, so it was pitch dark.  The teacher just called out to stop
and relax.  (The lesson horses understood "stop" perfectly well.)  There
were some nervous kids in the group.  Nothing noteworthy happened.

Stabled horses are used to being plunged into total darkness.  It happens
to them every night, sometimes more than once a night.

The barn had emergency lights, but the batteries had died of neglect.

Those of you who actually plan instead of improvising could keep a
flashlight handy.  Flashlights with LEDs that don't require batteries are
available, around US$20.  I've cursed myself for not having one many times.

- Jim

 
 
 

losing power at night while riding in the indoor

Post by forh.. » Tue, 02 Jan 2007 10:36:48

Good Boy Linus!


Quote:


> >Fortunately, I was just trotting along on Linus when WHAM!  A transformer
> >blew on the street, right next to the barn's driveway.I am very familiar with that noise, it's like someone firing a .44
> magnum next to you.

> No wonder the horses were a bit nervous... I am totally impressed with
> Linus... my horses would have not taken it so well.

> Hunter

 
 
 

losing power at night while riding in the indoor

Post by JC Dil » Tue, 02 Jan 2007 12:58:16



Quote:
>Those of you who actually plan instead of improvising could keep a
>flashlight handy.  Flashlights with LEDs that don't require batteries are
>available, around US$20.  I've cursed myself for not having one many times.

A really useful flashlight for power outages is the type that lives
plugged into a socket in the wall, constantly charging.  If the wall
socket goes dead, the flashlight turns itself on.  So it works as an
emergency light as well as a flahslight.

jc

--

"The nice thing about a mare is you get to ride a lot
 of different horses without having to own that many."  
     ~ Eileen Morgan of The Mare's Nest, PA

 
 
 

losing power at night while riding in the indoor

Post by John Hasle » Tue, 02 Jan 2007 22:22:49

Quote:
jc writes:
> A really useful flashlight for power outages is the type that lives
> plugged into a socket in the wall, constantly charging.  If the wall
> socket goes dead, the flashlight turns itself on.

The batteries die after a few years.
--
John Hasler           Boarding, Lessons, Training

Dancing Horse Hill
Elmwood, WI USA