To lease/buy or not to lease a farm - your experience with boarders

To lease/buy or not to lease a farm - your experience with boarders

Post by RPM1 » Thu, 10 Aug 2000 04:00:00


I/we have an opportunity to lease with option to buy our
friend's farm next spring.  The house is a drop dead
gorgeous massive log home with a roughed out apartment
that would work nicely for my mom to come live with us
(she's getting more and more limited with her sight/glaucoma).

The whole place is in pristine condition.  11 or 12
stall barn with wash stall, heated lounge, tack room
with lockers for boarders, 4 board fence, run in sheds,
electric to water tanks in pastures, huge outdoor
sand arena ... all on the edge of a 3,000 acre state
park approved for equestrian use.  It's 21 acres but
only a few are usable for pasture IOW you have to
feed hay year round (not thrilled about that).

In order to make the whole thing work out we'd have
to take in some boarders.  What say y'all?  Pros/cons...
For those of you with boarders do you EVER get to
go away on vacation?  If so, how?  Also, for you log home
owners, is there anything that should be considered when
buying a log home?

Ruth CM

 
 
 

To lease/buy or not to lease a farm - your experience with boarders

Post by mmchug » Thu, 10 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:

> In order to make the whole thing work out we'd have
> to take in some boarders.  What say y'all?  Pros/cons...
> For those of you with boarders do you EVER get to
> go away on vacation?  If so, how?  Also, for you log home
> owners, is there anything that should be considered when
> buying a log home?

> Ruth CM

A friend of mine built a similar farm.  It's 24 acres w/11 stall barn,
indoor and outdoor.  They live in an apt. above the barn with hopes of
building their dream house someday on a knoll which looks over the barn.

I think the largest problem you face is that both of you work (do you
work full time?).  Hence, if you want to run the kind of facility that I
think you want to run and actually have time to ride your own kritters,
you aren't going to be able to do the work yourself.  Here's how my
friend makes it work.

Both she and her husband work full time at other careers.  Since neither
of them is available to oversee the facility full time, they decided to
go with a self-care cooperative.  The key to making this concept work is
screening the prospective boarders exceedingly well.  Most of her
boarders she knew personally before opening up the farm or were
recommended by the current boarders as good candidates.  She has turned
down quite a few people who believed themselves 'perfect' for the
facility.  So far, this is year 2, she hasn't had any major problems
with people slacking off.

She does the feeding and morning turnout.  Each person is responsible
for cleaning their own stalls each day.  Most people do it themselves
but I think at least one person who has a long commute has someone come
in to clean her stall.  Other boarders have on occasion also taken
advantage of the stall cleaner's services.  Each person is also
responsible for cleaning out their horse's paddock each day.  Turnout is
in 2's, so I'm not sure how they split up the work.  I would guess that
they take turns cleaning out the paddocks.  

All the paddocks have frost free Nelson automatic waterers so that's not
an issue even in the worst of weather.

The horses are turned out all day either in all-weather paddocks or
rotated through the larger pasture when it's grass growing season.  All
the horses are in at night.  What can I say?  She caters to the Dressage
Weenie crowd. :-)

Her barn isn't full yet, though not because of a lack of boarders.  She
has a waiting list of people dying to get in.  Right now, to fill the
empty stalls she would have to build more all weather paddocks and
they're not ready to do that yet.  The cooperative meets at least once a
year and they have all signed contracts as to their rights and
responsibilities.  It helps that hubster is a legaleagle.

The place is absolutely gorgeous.

If you have any specific questions, e-mail me and I'll send them along
to her.

Me, I'm too curmudgeonly to have boarders coming & going though I would
put up with that inconvenience if I didn't have a full time career
elsewhere.

Mary

 
 
 

To lease/buy or not to lease a farm - your experience with boarders

Post by J.A. Zan » Thu, 10 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:

>I/we have an opportunity to lease with option to buy our
>friend's farm next spring.

Sounds great.

Quote:

>The whole place is in pristine condition.  11 or 12
>stall barn with wash stall, heated lounge, tack room
>with lockers for boarders, 4 board fence, run in sheds,
>electric to water tanks in pastures, huge outdoor
>sand arena ... all on the edge of a 3,000 acre state
>park approved for equestrian use.  It's 21 acres but
>only a few are usable for pasture IOW you have to
>feed hay year round (not thrilled about that).

Ideal farm.

Quote:
>In order to make the whole thing work out we'd have
>to take in some boarders.  What say y'all?  Pros/cons...

How are you with dealing with strangers and idiots?  LOL. It's fur sur one
idiot will want to board with  you, no barn is complete without the wet behind
the ears horse owner.

Quote:
>For those of you with boarders do you EVER get to
>go away on vacation?  If so, how?  Also, for you log home
>owners, is there anything that should be considered when
>buying a log home?

It sounds like a great house, a nice barn, and if you want to go in to
*business* you will be set up for life.  It could be a life deciding decision,
go with your gut and make an honest assessment of your abilities as guardians
of stranger's horses. Some people cannot tolerate ineptitude, and you from many
posts (sorry) seem to be a tad rigid when it comes to incompetence.

On a :) note, log houses are popular around here and have wonderful great rooms
with open ceilings and good air flow.  Nice houses by in large.  Just don't go
sticking big holes in them, they do need some caulking from time to time.

~Jaz.  J.A. Zanot
                ,;;;,                                  
     ,;( )_, )~\|                                    
   ;; / |  |\      
   ' ;   \;  \
oo.,? ?,.oooo.,? ?,.o
(remove: zzz, to reply)

 
 
 

To lease/buy or not to lease a farm - your experience with boarders

Post by RPM1 » Thu, 10 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:

>Me, I'm too curmudgeonly to have boarders coming & going though I would
>put up with that inconvenience if I didn't have a full time career
>elsewhere.

I hear THAT!  My job is SO flexible it's ridiculous so
I have lots of room to work with.  It also helps that this
farm is less than 5 min from my office!  I can pop home
for lunch or whatever.

Back when the owner was keeping boarders I worked
for him at the barn in order to get my board from $300
to $100 a month.  I stopped by most mornings before
I went to work.  That's how we met.  I did that for about
2 years.  Eight years later we're still the best of friends.
I also used to farm sit for them 5-6 times a year when
they went jetting off to Paris or whathaveyou.

They are now ready to retire and have bought 2 places
out in Colorado Springs.  They don't want to sell the NY
farm until they are SURE they'll like Colorado life so there
is a chance we could be out on our ears if they decide
to come back (strong chances are they'll love Colorado
because they absolutely HATE NY).

One thing for sure I'll need a killer boarder's contract.  My
biggest fear is having a horse in dire need of vet care and
not being able to make a decision.  Or being stuck with an
animal/bills after a boarder has vaporized.

Ruth CM

 
 
 

To lease/buy or not to lease a farm - your experience with boarders

Post by RPM1 » Thu, 10 Aug 2000 04:00:00

J.A. Zanot:

Quote:
>How are you with dealing with strangers and idiots?  LOL. It's fur sur one
>idiot will want to board with  you, no barn is complete without the wet
behind
>the ears horse owner.

Oh gawd!  Here we got away from the horse
world in general and now we're considering
jumping in head first again.  <shudder>

Seriously, I think I'm a keen judge of folks.  I would
need to sit and meet each person and discuss
certain aspects of horseownership to get their
slant on things.  If they don't jive with ours they
can hoof it on down the highway because neither
of us will be happy if our attitudes clash tremendously.

I'd just want sensible owners who put the *realistic*
interest of the horse first.  No blankets, beanies and
booties at my barn that for damn sure. That means
no body clipping which would require blanketing.
Horses would come in for chow and in bad weather
but beyond that they'll be out stuffing their faces with
hay.  I think stating that right off the bat will weed out
a bunch of folks.  Good.  That's what I want.

Let's do a top ten list of questions to ask boarders
shall we?  Hey, I could give a test and then hold their
answers over their heads if problems arise. ;->

Our friends who own the farm used to have boarders
and a long waiting list but they just got so fed up with
dealing with idiots so they kicked everyone out.  The
place has been boarder free for 5-6 years now.  They
just have their three barrel horses there.

Quote:
>Some people cannot tolerate ineptitude, and you from many
>posts (sorry) seem to be a tad rigid when it comes to incompetence.

Yep, that's me for sure.

The good thing is as hard assed as I am Patrick is
the perfect opposite end of the spectrum.  Between
the two of us we even out.  ;-)

Ruth CM

 
 
 

To lease/buy or not to lease a farm - your experience with boarders

Post by Tralr » Thu, 10 Aug 2000 04:00:00

RE:  Boarders n Log Homes:
don't know much about Boarders anymore, but Log Homes are real popular here in
the high country of Colorado.  We have killer ultra violet sun that really
sucks any moisture out of anything wood, so the houses here need treating abut
once a yr or two, depending on their weather/sun exposure.  That can run into
some bucks.  If you have an exposed deck of wood, even worse!  Just something
to consider on log.
good luck, sounds killer!  What would you do if the owners decide they don't
like Colorado and wanna move back to the homestead?
Carrie N Miller
 
 
 

To lease/buy or not to lease a farm - your experience with boarders

Post by RPM1 » Thu, 10 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:

>What would you do if the owners decide they don't
>like Colorado and wanna move back to the homestead?

I hear you have an extra room or two. ;-)

Ruth CM

 
 
 

To lease/buy or not to lease a farm - your experience with boarders

Post by John Hasle » Thu, 10 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:
Ruth writes:
> For those of you with boarders do you EVER get to go away on vacation?

Certainly.  Why, I was able to get away for almost an entire day just a few
years ago.

Of course, we have no employees...
--
John Hasler

Dancing Horse Hill
Elmwood, Wisconsin

 
 
 

To lease/buy or not to lease a farm - your experience with boarders

Post by Sash » Thu, 10 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Quote:
> RE:  Boarders n Log Homes:
> don't know much about Boarders anymore, but Log Homes are real popular
here in
> the high country of Colorado.  We have killer ultra violet sun that really
> sucks any moisture out of anything wood, so the houses here need treating
abut
> once a yr or two, depending on their weather/sun exposure.  That can run
into
> some bucks.  If you have an exposed deck of wood, even worse!  Just
something
> to consider on log.
> good luck, sounds killer!

The website of Log Home Living (www.homebuyerpubs.com) has lots of info
about this.
 
 
 

To lease/buy or not to lease a farm - your experience with boarders

Post by Tralr » Fri, 11 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:
>I hear you have an extra room or two. ;-)

>Ruth CM

Heh heh soon!  Son is going away to school, so maybe we can finally get that
room organized for that long dreamed of B&B on a small scale!  Still working on
the campsites and cabins, but got lotsa room!
Carrie N Miller
 
 
 

To lease/buy or not to lease a farm - your experience with boarders

Post by gr.. » Fri, 11 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:
>Ruth writes:
> For those of you with boarders do you EVER get to go away on vacation?

We don't board, but we do keep a number of horses at home.

We have been able to get away for a few days or a week most years,
a trusted horsey friend comes in and feeds while we are gone.

Years ago when we used to board, one of the stable owners
had an arangement with one or two of the boarders,
these boarders would come in and do the work
while the owners were on vacation (in exchange for reduced board).