A Hay Rack Could Kill Your Horse

A Hay Rack Could Kill Your Horse

Post by avaugh » Sun, 19 Mar 2000 04:00:00


The readers of my newsletter emailed me back after receiving the
safety issue and said that the following information was so
important that I should tell others about it. I share this with
you in the hopes that it may save other horses' lives.

In the process of compiling information about my Horse Trailer
Tips newsletter, I spoke with a trainer who shared the following:

A hay rack could kill your horse...

A hay rack makes a nice convenience on a horse trailer and many
people try to add it themselves by getting an old rack off of a
station wagon or an older horse trailer. But we recommend not to
do that because it could kill your horse.

What people seem to do is bolt the hay rack to their trailer
with long lag bolts that stick down into the horse stall area of
the trailer roof. Even if the bolts just extend down a couple of
inches--they are a danger.

You see, if the horse rears up, and many do when traveling, that
bolt will lodge into the back of their head--the most vulnerable
part--and the horse is killed instantly. It is sad, but it has
happened many times.

If you have bolts sticking down into your horse stalls--remove
them today, before you forget. If you are looking at purchasing
a trailer, watch for this. If you share a trailer with a friend,
look for any protrusions into the horse stalls.

I put many tips into my safety issue this month. You can
subscribe to Horse Trailer Tips for free by sending an email to

Sincerely,

Aaron Vaughn

http://www.azairstride.com

* Sent from RemarQ http://www.remarq.com The Internet's Discussion Network *
The fastest and easiest way to search and participate in Usenet - Free!

 
 
 

A Hay Rack Could Kill Your Horse

Post by C.M.Newe » Sun, 19 Mar 2000 04:00:00

Wouldn't this be more appropriately titled--"poorly placed lag bolts
can kill your horse"?
CMNewell, DVM
self-proclaimed vet
Surgeon General of the Bogbash Party

 
 
 

A Hay Rack Could Kill Your Horse

Post by Sheryl Hucka » Sun, 19 Mar 2000 04:00:00

Quote:

>Wouldn't this be more appropriately titled--"poorly placed lag bolts
>can kill your horse"?

Begging to differ Doc, but if I had added a hay rack (with poorly placed lag
bolts) and scanned that title - I wouldn't have read it because I wouldn't
think that I had any lag bolts.  I might have recognised the hay rack part
though.  I might not have considered it linked it to my horse trailer.  Just an
opinion from the great unwashed.

Sheryl
Ashland City, Tennessee

If a small thing has the power to make you angry, does that not indicate
something about your size? - Sydney J. Harris

 
 
 

A Hay Rack Could Kill Your Horse

Post by The Handyma » Sun, 19 Mar 2000 04:00:00

I agree with the others that the title of this should have referred to
the bolts, NOT the hayrack.  There are protruding bolts from other
items bolted to a horse trailer.  In fact, I bought a used trailer,
and it had protruding bolts all over the place.  One of the first
things I did, was fix all of them as described below.

Now, since I am a handyman, I work with lots of hardware, and have a
solution......
First, they should not stick out more than 1/2 inch.
Saw them off, grind them off, or replace them.  IF you saw or grind
them, put a spare nut on there first, and turn it all the way down.
That way, when you are done with the sawing, you unscrew that nut, and
the threads are made usable again.

Next, go to almost any hardware store, and buy CAP NUTS.
They are rounded nuts that***on to the threads, and are
protective.  Kids swingsets often use them.....
Get the ones to match the size of your bolt thickness.  Then, just
***them on to the end of each protruding bolt, and tighten them.

NOTE: You DO NOT remove the nuts that are already on the bolts.
CAP NUTS are made for safety, not for strength.

The cost should be little.  A 1/4" cap nut will cost 50 cents or less.
More for thicker sizes, less if thinner.  So if your rack uses 6  1/4"
bolts, the cost will be around $3.00.  Cheap insurance !!!!

----

One other thing.  Never tie a small pony to the hooks in the front of
a walkin trailer, with a manger.  Put LOWER hooks to attach the pony.
I learned this the hard way, after my shetland decided he could rear
up, and go up INTO the manger, while attached to his "long" chain
intended for a big horse.  (Dont ask me his reasoning for that dumb
move).  Anyhow, that was one mess I dont want to deal with again,
especially after the chain got wrapped around his leg....  I was
fortunate, he was not hurt, but my back surely was, after lifting him
down to the floor, while fighting that chain.   With my new, LOWER
hook, and SHORT chain, he cant rear up.  That solved that for under $5
!!!!

I also do not use a chain anymore, for the horses.  I use a rope, or
one of those "bungie" cords made for that purpose.  A chain can not be
cut with a knife in an emergency.  I still use a chain for the ponies
though, because I want it REAL short, and havent found a cord short
enough, but it has a quick release.

Hope this helps !!!

On Sat, 18 Mar 2000 13:15:00 -0800, avaughn

Quote:

>The readers of my newsletter emailed me back after receiving the
>safety issue and said that the following information was so
>important that I should tell others about it. I share this with
>you in the hopes that it may save other horses' lives.

>In the process of compiling information about my Horse Trailer
>Tips newsletter, I spoke with a trainer who shared the following:

>A hay rack could kill your horse...

>A hay rack makes a nice convenience on a horse trailer and many
>people try to add it themselves by getting an old rack off of a
>station wagon or an older horse trailer. But we recommend not to
>do that because it could kill your horse.

>What people seem to do is bolt the hay rack to their trailer
>with long lag bolts that stick down into the horse stall area of
>the trailer roof. Even if the bolts just extend down a couple of
>inches--they are a danger.

>You see, if the horse rears up, and many do when traveling, that
>bolt will lodge into the back of their head--the most vulnerable
>part--and the horse is killed instantly. It is sad, but it has
>happened many times.

>If you have bolts sticking down into your horse stalls--remove
>them today, before you forget. If you are looking at purchasing
>a trailer, watch for this. If you share a trailer with a friend,
>look for any protrusions into the horse stalls.

>I put many tips into my safety issue this month. You can
>subscribe to Horse Trailer Tips for free by sending an email to

>Sincerely,

>Aaron Vaughn

>http://SportToday.org/

>* Sent from RemarQ http://SportToday.org/ The Internet's Discussion Network *
>The fastest and easiest way to search and participate in Usenet - Free!

 
 
 

A Hay Rack Could Kill Your Horse

Post by OKSTABL » Mon, 20 Mar 2000 04:00:00

Quote:
>Subject: A Hay Rack Could Kill Your Horse
>From: avaughn
>people try to add it themselves by getting an old rack off of a
>station wagon

Do you mean the roof rack from a station wagon? Wouldn't that be too wide,
wouldn't the hay fall through the slats?  

Quote:
>What people seem to do is bolt the hay rack to their trailer
>with long lag bolts that stick down into the horse stall area of

Ok sorry, I thought for a moment you were putting a hay manger inside the
trailer, for the horses to eat off of. I guess that you mean a roof rack?  It
is hard to put things on the rack without a ladder or steps.

Quote:
>You see, if the horse rears up, and many do when traveling,

Most all of the horses I haul (20,000 miles on my truck last year hauling) do
not rear in the trailer. My trailer is 8' tall and 8' wide, they may feel very
safe with the size, and I do not know of one that has reared in my trailer. I
have had the trailer 5 years now, it has a roof rack, we mostly haul jumps when
going to away shows where we are "based" off the show grounds for long periods
of time.

Quote:
>look for any protrusions into the horse stalls.

include on this list of protrusions, wasp nest's, in the summer you may end up
with un-invited guests riding with the horses.

My goal this year is to install cameras in the trailer with a monitor in the
cab. Happy Trails ya'll.  Jay

 
 
 

A Hay Rack Could Kill Your Horse

Post by magi.. » Mon, 20 Mar 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

>>Wouldn't this be more appropriately titled--"poorly placed lag bolts
>>can kill your horse"?

>Begging to differ Doc, but if I had added a hay rack (with poorly placed lag
>bolts) and scanned that title - I wouldn't have read it because I wouldn't
>think that I had any lag bolts.  I might have recognised the hay rack part
>though.  I might not have considered it linked it to my horse trailer.  Just an
>opinion from the great unwashed.

Then again, I was totally mystified about this thread until I understood he was
ranting about poorly attached "roof racks".  I've never thought of them as "hay
racks" because all sorts of things get attached to them.  Hay racks are devices
used when *feeding* horses in my part of the world.

I think a better title for this thread should have been "Improperly installed
horse trailer roof rack could kill your horse".

YMMV

jc

 
 
 

A Hay Rack Could Kill Your Horse

Post by R Bisho » Mon, 20 Mar 2000 04:00:00



Quote:


>>>Wouldn't this be more appropriately titled--"poorly placed lag bolts
>>>can kill your horse"?

>>Begging to differ Doc, but if I had added a hay rack (with poorly placed lag
>>bolts) and scanned that title - I wouldn't have read it because I wouldn't
>>think that I had any lag bolts.  I might have recognised the hay rack part
>>though.  I might not have considered it linked it to my horse trailer.  Just an
>>opinion from the great unwashed.

>Then again, I was totally mystified about this thread until I understood he was
>ranting about poorly attached "roof racks".  I've never thought of them as "hay
>racks" because all sorts of things get attached to them.  Hay racks are devices
>used when *feeding* horses in my part of the world.

>I think a better title for this thread should have been "Improperly installed
>horse trailer roof rack could kill your horse".

I think a still better title should have been, don't put hay racks in your horse
trailer.  I have a 16 foot stock trailer with NO racks.  If I want to feed my
horses, I give them a flake of hay, loose on the floor or*** from a hay
bag.  Hay racks are not necessary, take up needed room, and prevent the horse from
lowering its head so it can cough and relax.  

Quote:

>YMMV

>jc

Sue, hayrackless

"Never trust anything that thinks for itself,
if you can't see where it keeps its brain."

J K Rowlings

 
 
 

A Hay Rack Could Kill Your Horse

Post by The Handyma » Mon, 20 Mar 2000 04:00:00

Quote:
>>look for any protrusions into the horse stalls.

I look for protruding bolts, nails, and anything else ANYWHERE a horse
is housed or fenced....  The couple hours you spend doing that can
save your horse months of pain, and save you lots of vet bills and
loss of riding time...

Quote:

>include on this list of protrusions, wasp nest's, in the summer you may end up
>with un-invited guests riding with the horses.

Wasps !!!  I hate those suckers....
I ran into a nest of them, while up on a ladder, and they attacked.
The 12 foot fall hurt much less than the bites from them....
I avoid chemical sprays, UNTIL I see those suckers.....

Quote:
>My goal this year is to install cameras in the trailer with a monitor in the
>cab. Happy Trails ya'll.  Jay

BE CAREFUL - A horse might sue you for "invasion of privacy"
   <grinning>....
 
 
 

A Hay Rack Could Kill Your Horse

Post by magi.. » Mon, 20 Mar 2000 04:00:00

Quote:

>>Then again, I was totally mystified about this thread until I understood he was
>>ranting about poorly attached "roof racks".  I've never thought of them as "hay
>>racks" because all sorts of things get attached to them.  Hay racks are devices
>>used when *feeding* horses in my part of the world.

>>I think a better title for this thread should have been "Improperly installed
>>horse trailer roof rack could kill your horse".

>I think a still better title should have been, don't put hay racks in your horse
>trailer.  I have a 16 foot stock trailer with NO racks.  If I want to feed my
>horses, I give them a flake of hay, loose on the floor or*** from a hay
>bag.  Hay racks are not necessary, take up needed room, and prevent the horse from
>lowering its head so it can cough and relax.  

He's talking about racks on the *outside* roof of the trailer, not inside.  They
are racks for transporting bales of hay and other equipment, not for feeding.

jc

 
 
 

A Hay Rack Could Kill Your Horse

Post by Tim Shurtlef » Mon, 20 Mar 2000 04:00:00

On Sat, 18 Mar 2000 13:15:00 -0800, avaughn

Quote:

>What people seem to do is bolt the hay rack to their trailer
>with long lag bolts that stick down into the horse stall area of
>the trailer roof. Even if the bolts just extend down a couple of
>inches--they are a danger.

Before you give advice, get your terms right if you want to have credibility.  

Lag bolts are made to go into wood, not metal.  They are big wood screws with
hex heads.  They would be dangerous, if sticking down from a trailer's roof, but
I have never seen a trailer with a wooden roof, and anyone who used them in a
metal roof is a lot more dangerous than just to the (ob)horse because the lag
bolts will likely not hold in sheet metal with the shifting of the load, and to
get them to go into stouter metal would require drilling a hole big enough that
they would not grab tight enough.  The entire hay rack could come off and land
on someone elses vehicle at high speed.   Multi-car pileups on the interstate
come to mind.  

If someone used bolts to attach a hay rack, they are likely to have used
carriage bolts (round head, or machine bolts (hex head).   If such bolts were
used, the easier fix is to cut them off (an angle grinder or abrasive wheel
cutoff tool would make it easy), or take them out and reverse them so the nut is
on top, then cut the excess bolt off, or just buy bolts the right length in the
first place.  

Tim S.

 
 
 

A Hay Rack Could Kill Your Horse

Post by WVK1 » Tue, 21 Mar 2000 04:00:00

Quote:
>>>I think a better title for this thread should have been "Improperly
>installed
>>>horse trailer roof rack could kill your horse".
>jc

I'm just glad my horses didn't see this subject title :-) I have a hard enought
time convincing them everything else isn't out to get them. I pictured hay
racks with huge teeth and claws emerging from the stalls, chasing the horses
down the road. LOL
 
 
 

A Hay Rack Could Kill Your Horse

Post by R Bisho » Tue, 21 Mar 2000 04:00:00



Quote:

>>>Then again, I was totally mystified about this thread until I understood he was
>>>ranting about poorly attached "roof racks".  I've never thought of them as "hay
>>>racks" because all sorts of things get attached to them.  Hay racks are devices
>>>used when *feeding* horses in my part of the world.

>>>I think a better title for this thread should have been "Improperly installed
>>>horse trailer roof rack could kill your horse".

>>I think a still better title should have been, don't put hay racks in your horse
>>trailer.  I have a 16 foot stock trailer with NO racks.  If I want to feed my
>>horses, I give them a flake of hay, loose on the floor or*** from a hay
>>bag.  Hay racks are not necessary, take up needed room, and prevent the horse from
>>lowering its head so it can cough and relax.  

>He's talking about racks on the *outside* roof of the trailer, not inside.  They
>are racks for transporting bales of hay and other equipment, not for feeding.

I see.  I was making the same assumption.  I also didn't realize he was talking
about ROOF racks as compared to HAY racks.  My trailer doesn't have ROOF racks,
either.  In this damp climate, it would just be one more thing to rust.

Sue

Quote:
>jc

"Never trust anything that thinks for itself,
if you can't see where it keeps its brain."

J K Rowlings

 
 
 

A Hay Rack Could Kill Your Horse

Post by Caroline Mull » Tue, 21 Mar 2000 04:00:00

On Sat, 18 Mar 2000 19:26:54 -0600, The Handyman

Quote:

>I agree with the others that the title of this should have referred to
>the bolts, NOT the hayrack.  There are protruding bolts from other
>items bolted to a horse trailer.  In fact, I bought a used trailer,
>and it had protruding bolts all over the place.  One of the first
>things I did, was fix all of them as described below.

>Now, since I am a handyman, I work with lots of hardware, and have a
>solution......
>First, they should not stick out more than 1/2 inch.
>Saw them off, grind them off, or replace them.  IF you saw or grind
>them, put a spare nut on there first, and turn it all the way down.
>That way, when you are done with the sawing, you unscrew that nut, and
>the threads are made usable again.

>Next, go to almost any hardware store, and buy CAP NUTS.
>They are rounded nuts that***on to the threads, and are
>protective.  Kids swingsets often use them.....
>Get the ones to match the size of your bolt thickness.  Then, just
>screw them on to the end of each protruding bolt, and tighten them.

>NOTE: You DO NOT remove the nuts that are already on the bolts.
>CAP NUTS are made for safety, not for strength.

>The cost should be little.  A 1/4" cap nut will cost 50 cents or less.
>More for thicker sizes, less if thinner.  So if your rack uses 6  1/4"
>bolts, the cost will be around $3.00.  Cheap insurance !!!!

>----

>One other thing.  Never tie a small pony to the hooks in the front of
>a walkin trailer, with a manger.  Put LOWER hooks to attach the pony.
>I learned this the hard way, after my shetland decided he could rear
>up, and go up INTO the manger, while attached to his "long" chain
>intended for a big horse.  (Dont ask me his reasoning for that dumb
>move).  Anyhow, that was one mess I dont want to deal with again,
>especially after the chain got wrapped around his leg....  I was
>fortunate, he was not hurt, but my back surely was, after lifting him
>down to the floor, while fighting that chain.   With my new, LOWER
>hook, and SHORT chain, he cant rear up.  That solved that for under $5
>!!!!

>I also do not use a chain anymore, for the horses.  I use a rope, or
>one of those "bungie" cords made for that purpose.  A chain can not be
>cut with a knife in an emergency.  I still use a chain for the ponies
>though, because I want it REAL short, and havent found a cord short
>enough, but it has a quick release.

>Hope this helps !!!

Dear Mr. Handyman,
        I am an "Industrial Maintenance Mechanic" (Journeyman, or,
ergh...., journeywoman) and you post is right on. Very good info,
presented well! I own an older Supreme 4-horse trailer, and I am
planning on some common-sense "retrofits" to it. Who ever heard of a
4-horse trailer having only 2 places to tie your horse anyway? I am
going to weld 2 more ties and 4 hay net loops to the teailer. What
thickness round stock do you think I should use? The stock ties are
about 1/4" round stock. I thought the 1/4" would be good for the horse
ties, and something smaller (could be MUCH smaller) for the hay nets.
I also pondered a couple of additional (and seperate) ties for water
buckets, so that those are out of the way a little also. I would make
all of these in a round "u" shape, out of round stock, and mig weld
them to the trailer. Any comments/suggestions?  I really like my
trailer (roomy, solid, plenty of space) but am pretty mistified about
the lack of outside ties. I took a bunch of kids/horses to a show last
year (a full load!) and my biggeest gripe was the lack of places to
tie horses. The trailer is long enough to tie two horses on the same
side of it and still keep them out of kicking range (with my crew-cab
duelly the rig takes your proverbial 40 acre field to turn around if
you can turn around at all, with the kids in the truck!). If you would
make any suggestions, I would be thrilled to hear! I need to get the
trailer painted this year (got a line on a good paint deal) , and want
to get the welding done first. Thanks in advance for your help!
        Caroline Muller
        (and I thought 4-H would be good for me.....)
 
 
 

A Hay Rack Could Kill Your Horse

Post by avaughn1.. » Fri, 24 Mar 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

> >>>I think a better title for this thread should have been "Improperly
> >installed
> >>>horse trailer roof rack could kill your horse".

> >jc

> I'm just glad my horses didn't see this subject title :-) I have a
hard enought
> time convincing them everything else isn't out to get them. I
pictured hay
> racks with huge teeth and claws emerging from the stalls, chasing the
horses
> down the road. LOL

Thanks for the information. A better title would have been bolt on hay
rack. In speaking with a trainer the other day, he got me so e***d
about this subject, that I admit I may not have thought it through all
the way.
For example, he used the term lag bolts in a generic way, but I
understood exactly what he meant. It should have just been bolts. I
still believe that people do many things that can be harmful to their
horses unless they think through what they are doing. Anything that
protrudes or extends into the horse stalls can pose a danger.
The Handyman's information about the Cap Nuts is great advice, and if
nothing else, I am glad I posted just to find out about that.
H Geertsema, DVM, also told me that a safe and convenient
alternative is a shallow hay bag developed by Randy Brodoway. Unlike a
haynet is doesn't have holes that a horse could get caught up in, is
shallow and yet collapses like a cloth bag. Randy can be reached at
604-607-1282.
Yours Truly,
Aaron Vaughn

Sent via Deja.com http://SportToday.org/
Before you buy.

 
 
 

A Hay Rack Could Kill Your Horse

Post by avaughn1.. » Fri, 24 Mar 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

> Wouldn't this be more appropriately titled--"poorly placed lag bolts
> can kill your horse"?
> CMNewell, DVM
> self-proclaimed vet
> Surgeon General of the Bogbash Party

Actually I should have just said something like poorly placed bolts...

The main thing is that anything that protrudes or extends into the
horse stalls can pose a danger.

H Geertsema, DVM, also told me that a safe and convenient
alternative is a shallow hay bag developed by Randy Brodoway.  Unlike a
haynet is doesn't have holes that a horse could get caught up in, is
shallow and yet collapses like a cloth bag.  Randy can be reached at
604-607-1282.

Yours Truly,

Aaron Vaughn

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.