*Teaching a horse to lay down on command

*Teaching a horse to lay down on command

Post by Per-Tore Aasestra » Mon, 08 Jan 1996 04:00:00


Hi there,

I once read an article in Horse&Rider about a guy who had been able to
train his horse to do several tricks. He could get the horse to lay
down by himself on command.

I would be very interested in knowing how this could be done, and how
long time one normally would need for this training. Can it be done
with 'any' horse? Could it have some negative side-effects?

 
 
 

*Teaching a horse to lay down on command

Post by Imonics Corporati » Mon, 08 Jan 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

>I once read an article in Horse&Rider about a guy who had been able to
>train his horse to do several tricks. He could get the horse to lay
>down by himself on command.

Teaching a horse to lay down is standard circus/vaudville stuff. Chuck
Grant's book Training the Haute Ecole or High School Horse contains
instructions on how to teach you horse to lay down, and many other
tricks. Its published by Walsworth Publishing Company, 306 North Kansas
Avenue, Marceline, Missouri 64658. The book is a bit old, 1982, but I
was able to get a copy from Robin Bledsoe, the equestrian bookseller.
Grant's protege, Mari Zdunic, also has a videotape out explaining how to
train various Haute Ecole movements, including laying down.

Before you buy the book, be warned that training the horse for the
Haute Ecole takes an enormous amount of patience and lots of time.
(And if your horse is as slow to catch on as mine, it takes even
more time...) Training the horse to lay down requires several stages,
such as first teaching the horse to bow on one knee, and then kneel on
both knees. There's a picture in Grant's book of four horses laying on
the ground at the same time.

As for the relevance of this to modern riding, there isn't any practical
reason you'd want your horse to lay down.  However, I find that in my
attempts to train various tricks from the ground I learn more about how
to interact with horses to get them to do what I want, and in doing so
hope to be a better rider.

--
Michael Czeiszperger | "Those riders who seek exactitude and absolute accuracy
Imonics 919-461-6366 | destroy the courage of a brave horse and ruin the gen-
Raleign, NC          | tility which nature has given him" -- La Gueriniere


 
 
 

*Teaching a horse to lay down on command

Post by Dave Ho » Tue, 09 Jan 1996 04:00:00

Quote:

>Hi there,

>I once read an article in Horse&Rider about a guy who had been able to
>train his horse to do several tricks. He could get the horse to lay
>down by himself on command.

>I would be very interested in knowing how this could be done, and how
>long time one normally would need for this training. Can it be done
>with 'any' horse? Could it have some negative side-effects?

Hi again Per-Tore,
  I responded to your personnal note and gave you the short series of
steps to train your horse to lie down.  Just note of caution - there are
some remarkably challenged folks out there - and some of them are even
lawyers . . .
  I have a friend who was standing beside a horse who decided to roll -
she somehow let the horse roll on top of her and broke her leg seriously
!!!  I have had several horses "forget" I was riding them and start to
roll - time to get e***d.
   Any "trick" that might produce an unexpected danger can be bad.  Of
course - take a watch of the old Roy Rodgers and Trigger films - and you
will see Trigger mingling with the crowds - with no ill effects.  For
everything you teach your horse - be sure to teach them NEVER to do it
unless asked.   I usually put in a stopper while teaching - like the
Spanish Walk - it could get a knee cap if the horse does it shile you're
walking him - so teach him NO  or   STOP THAT   or something else and
reinforce it if he does the behavior when you don't ask.

Best wishes,  Dave Howe.

 
 
 

*Teaching a horse to lay down on command

Post by Dan Swoffo » Tue, 09 Jan 1996 04:00:00

Quote:

>Hi there,
>I once read an article in Horse&Rider about a guy who had been able to
>train his horse to do several tricks. He could get the horse to lay
>down by himself on command.
>I would be very interested in knowing how this could be done, and how
>long time one normally would need for this training. Can it be done
>with 'any' horse? Could it have some negative side-effects?

I trained my appy to do this. Took about 1/2 hour a day for 4 days.
Simple.
Step one: get the horse to hold it's left leg up just like you are
going to clean the hoof. but the horse must hold the leg up
Step two: while the leg is held up start getting the horse to lean
backwards. Not stepping back just leaning back. the right front leg
gets extended.
Step three: The horse leans back and rests his right front leg on the
ground. The horse is bowing. Ta Da.
Step four: This is a little harder. When the horse is bowing push the
horse over on its side.

Use sugar cubes for rewards all along. Training sessions hould be VERY
short. Just get a nice improvement however small and quit. Dont keep
going and***the horse off.

Do it right and the horse will have a great time doing it. Dont let it
get out of hand. Only let him do the trick when you want him to do it.
The first trick horse I trained, was trained to take my hat off. Well
pretty soon the horse way taking eveyones hat off , the stall cleaner,
the feeder, the vet the shoeer.

Have fun I think it is a great way to get a horse to think. All my
trick horses rode better and trained for riding faster and better
after learning tricks,
Dan

Dan Martin Swofford

Publisher of:
Ride! Online Magazine - http://SportToday.org/
Velozine - http://SportToday.org/
WebSmith - http://SportToday.org/

 
 
 

*Teaching a horse to lay down on command

Post by Terry von Gea » Tue, 09 Jan 1996 04:00:00

Quote:

>Hi there,
>I once read an article in Horse&Rider about a guy who had been able to
>train his horse to do several tricks. He could get the horse to lay
>down by himself on command.
>I would be very interested in knowing how this could be done, and how
>long time one normally would need for this training. Can it be done
>with 'any' horse? Could it have some negative side-effects?

If the horse has your favorite saddle installed you might find it
off-putting.

Laying down horses is the big rage here in the People's Republic of
Santa Cruz.  All of the touchie-feelies are attempting to do same as
some sort of demonstration of trust, ***, or some other crap.
Seems like a monumental waste of time to me.  All of the people and
horses engaging in this questionable activity haven't seemed to improve
any from the experience.

Some cavalries used to train their horses to lay down.  The horse made a
nice barricade from behind which they could lob shots at the enemy.  The
need for this sort of thing seems to be long past.

--
Terry                     You'll get further with a smile and a gun
                          than just a smile.

 
 
 

*Teaching a horse to lay down on command

Post by Tom Stova » Tue, 09 Jan 1996 04:00:00


re: neat tricks

=I once read an article in Horse&Rider about a guy who had been able to
=train his horse to do several tricks. He could get the horse to lay
=down by himself on command...

One of my barrel racers had a horse that would lie down on cue. All you
had to do was pick up the left front, then pull it *out* after you
got it off the ground. The horse would go down like a shot dog. Cute as
hell! Of course, I found all this out when I inadvertently cued him
while shoeing him.

If you teach your horsey a neat trick like lying down on cue, make sure
your liability insurance is up to date or some litigious sort may end
up owning your store and all the fixtures.

Tom Stovall
AFA Journeyman Farrier

* SLMR 2.1a * Did that gesture mean your team is number one?

----
+------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|Ye Olde Bailey BBS Zyxel 713-520-1569(V.32bis) USR 713-520-9566(V.34/FC)|
|   Houston,Texas             yob.com           Home of alt.cosuard      |
+------------------------------------------------------------------------+

 
 
 

*Teaching a horse to lay down on command

Post by Kris Anderso » Thu, 11 Jan 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

>As for the relevance of this to modern riding, there isn't any practical
>reason you'd want your horse to lay down.  However, I find that in my
>attempts to train various tricks from the ground I learn more about how
>to interact with horses to get them to do what I want, and in doing so
>hope to be a better rider.

        I always thought that it would be nice to have a horse that would at
least kneel down so that I could get on.  I've never thought that it was
important enough to go to all the trouble to actually teach it, but it
would be nice on those occasions when I've walked way out in the field to
get my horse, and the fences are all electric, and there's no place to
get on.

        I don't know if it's true or not, but I have heard that a horse can
easily strain it's front legs by getting up with the added weight of a
rider.  That, coupled with the fact that I'd probably have to keep the
horse tuned up, as well as spend all that time teaching the horse in the
first place, probably means that it wouldn't be worth the effort for the
one or two times that it would come in handy.


Williamstown, MA                      1 donkey, cows, dogs, cat, etc.

 
 
 

*Teaching a horse to lay down on command

Post by Elizabeth Mcconne » Thu, 11 Jan 1996 04:00:00

A negative side effect would be that he would do it when you didn't want
him to. There is a book on how to teach you horse tricks...I'm looking
for a copy because I have a miniature horse I thought it would be cute to
teach tricks.
-