Foundering, Dishing & Shoeing

Foundering, Dishing & Shoeing

Post by LisaX41 » Sun, 08 Oct 2000 15:26:55


hi all, I have a 14 yr old Qh/TB mare, who has rotated 3 degrees.  I am going
to start from the beginning or you won't understand this whole thing. Ok here
goes:

I had xrays done about 6 months ago. Farrier went down to see xrays about a
week later. Made appt with farrier a couple days after, for the next week. My
vet recommended a hospital plate. Shoer found an easier, and same healing ratio
as the hospital plates. He used the wedged pads, on normal shoes. It was also
$100 cheaper. Ok.. during this time, she had a slight dish going on. After 7
weeks, I had her reshod. She was dishing at the time of shoeing. I figured out
that 7 weeks was too much of a time frame to go in between shoeings, so after,
I had her reshod at 5 weeks. Again, she was dishing.  After that second
shoeing, I moved to where my farrier doesn't come down this far. This was about
2 1/2 months ago. About 1 1/2 months ago, my mare had lost a shoe. So I pulled
the other one off (she has rotated in both fronts). OK, now since i pulled her
shoes off, she hasn't dished, but in fact, has a more normal appearance in her
hoofs (minus the founder rings and dropped soles). I also haven't had her
trimmed either. I've been letting the dirt do that naturally, so she has nice
rounded toes now.

 My question is this. Why hasn't she dished barefoot vs. the wedged pads? Has
the 2 shoeings healed her that much, that she's not dishing? I also have
another question. I have since found another farrier, and am wondering if I
should continue with the wedged pads, even though 1 1/2 months has passed
without her having her pads on.Or should I have her re-xrayed? Even if I did
have her re-xrayed, I would still continue with the wedged pads.  I hadn't had
her reshod sooner, due to a fetlock joint injury, so I was letting it heal (was
going to call farrier the next day, then the injury happend). It has healed
enough now, to where the farrier can pick up her foot and work on it. I need
some suggestions, and answers to my questions, if anyone can help me.. Thanks!!

Lisa

 
 
 

Foundering, Dishing & Shoeing

Post by Tom Stoval » Sun, 08 Oct 2000 04:00:00


Quote:
>hi all, I have a 14 yr old Qh/TB mare, who has rotated 3 degrees...

While some veterinarians are still fond of saying [n] degrees of
rotation, a much better and infinitely more accurate form of expressing
the amount of rotation is to measure the difference between the wall and
the proximal and distal portions of P3 on a fresh lateral radiograph.
"Three degrees" can mean different things, but three millimeters means
the same thing in both Boston and Botswana.

[deletia in places]

Quote:
>My vet recommended a hospital plate. Shoer found an easier, and same
>healing ratio as the hospital plates. He used the wedged pads, on >normal shoes...

Bzzzzt! The tail was wagging the dog. Hereabouts, veterinarians order
certain veterinary farriery procedures and applications, not farriers.
Disagreements on those procedures are held in private, often fueled with
medicinal spirits, and can become *very* loud; but, in the end, the
veterinarian always prevails in terms of recommendation. If the farrier
disagrees strongly enough, he can simply refuse to do a procedure, he
does not do something different on his own volition.

Put another way, if I follow a veterinarian's orders, the veterinarian's
carrier is liable; if I disregard his orders and do something else, mine
is.

Quote:
>It was also $100 cheaper. Ok.. during this time, she had a slight
>dish going on. After 7 weeks, I had her reshod. She was dishing at
>the time of shoeing. I figured out that 7 weeks was too much of a
>time frame to go in between shoeings, so after, I had her reshod at
>5 weeks. Again, she was dishing.  After that second shoeing, I moved
>to where my farrier doesn't come down this far. This was about 2 1/2
>months ago. About 1 1/2 months ago, my mare had lost a shoe. So I
>pulled the other one off (she has rotated in both fronts). OK, now
>since i pulled her shoes off, she hasn't dished, but in fact, has a
>more normal appearance in her hoofs (minus the founder rings and
>dropped soles). I also haven't had her trimmed either. I've been
>letting the dirt do that naturally, so she has nice rounded toes
>now.

>My question is this. Why hasn't she dished barefoot vs. the wedged
>pads? Has the 2 shoeings healed her that much, that she's not
>dishing?

Your timely benign neglect is responsible for the appearance of her
feet. Shod to the end of her foot with no P3 support, the dishing was
indicative of the protected wall's being mechanically levered away from
P3. Barefooted, with environmental support, the distal wall broke off in
normal wear, giving the foot a more normal appearance.

Quote:
>I also have another question. I have since found another farrier,
>and am wondering if I should continue with the wedged pads, even
>though 1 1/2 months has passed without her having her pads on.

Wedge pads raise the phalangeal angle, but they don't offer any support
for P3. If the foot is shod full to the toe, the application of wedge
pads becomes mechanically oxymoronic because, while wedges raise
phalangeal angulation, shoeing full to the toe - instead of facilitating
turnover by setting the shoe under - *lengthens* the phalangeal lever.
Long levers give the DDFT a mechanical advantage that can result in more
rotation.

You might consider getting a fresh set of laterals and a farrier who is
familiar with the various procedures pioneered by the late Burney
Chapman.

p&m

Tom Stovall CJF
Farrier & Blacksmith

http://www.katyforge.com