Major problem...need help.

Major problem...need help.

Post by Richard J Scherping » Fri, 18 Mar 1994 01:43:29


I am having a problem with pocket-gophers, and I was wondering if anyone
had any ideas how to solve it.

I own about 65 acres, about 30 of which is pasture.  Last spring I sold
30 acres on which I had alfalfa and rye.  The soil on those fields is
a sandy-loam mix so it provided an excellent environment for the pocket-
gophers to live in.  As the developers started moving dirt around on the
fields, the pocket-gophers have moved their colony into my pastures.
This by its self would probably not be too bad, but the problem comes at
night, when foxes come to hunt them.  As soon as it gets dark, the foxes
start digging out the pocket-gopher holes, and they will work at it until
dawn digging between 25-40 holes.  Along with the hole digging, the horses
I have in these pastures tend to get very scared and run through fences, when
there are 6 or 7 foxes prowling among them at night.

When the pocket-gophers were in the alfalfa fields I kept the fox population
down by shooting them at night, after I cut a section of the alfalfa
fields.  This is no longer an option, becauses homes are being built on
both side of my property, and the owners have a slight dislike for a shotgun
going off at 3:00am.

So, as I see it, if I get rid of the pocket-gophers; the foxes will leave,
the horses will stop running through fences, and the neighbors will get off
my back.  The pasture covers about 30 acres, so trapping or shooting the
pocket-gophers is out.

Any ideas would greatly be appreciated.

                Rick

 
 
 

Major problem...need help.

Post by SALMOND, ANDREA ANNE » Fri, 18 Mar 1994 07:36:00


Quote:

>I am having a problem with pocket-gophers, and I was wondering if anyone
>had any ideas how to solve it.

>I own about 65 acres, about 30 of which is pasture.  Last spring I sold
>30 acres on which I had alfalfa and rye.  The soil on those fields is
>a sandy-loam mix so it provided an excellent environment for the pocket-
>gophers to live in.  As the developers started moving dirt around on the
>fields, the pocket-gophers have moved their colony into my pastures.
>This by its self would probably not be too bad, but the problem comes at
>night, when foxes come to hunt them.  As soon as it gets dark, the foxes
>start digging out the pocket-gopher holes, and they will work at it until
>dawn digging between 25-40 holes.  Along with the hole digging, the horses
>I have in these pastures tend to get very scared and run through fences, when
>there are 6 or 7 foxes prowling among them at night.

>When the pocket-gophers were in the alfalfa fields I kept the fox population
>down by shooting them at night, after I cut a section of the alfalfa
>fields.  This is no longer an option, becauses homes are being built on
>both side of my property, and the owners have a slight dislike for a shotgun
>going off at 3:00am.

>So, as I see it, if I get rid of the pocket-gophers; the foxes will leave,
>the horses will stop running through fences, and the neighbors will get off
>my back.  The pasture covers about 30 acres, so trapping or shooting the
>pocket-gophers is out.

>Any ideas would greatly be appreciated.

>            Rick

Okay, this might be alot of work, but have you tried drowning them?  My
grandma used to do this on smaller patches of land, like the house yard
(about 10 acres).  All it requires is a big bucket, lots of water, and a
little elbow grease.  Just fill up the bucket, pour it down all the holes
you can find, and hope for the best.  It seems like a lot of work, maybe
it's a dumb suggestion for that much property.

Sorry if I've wasted your time, I'm a little bored! :)

Andrea!

 
 
 

Major problem...need help.

Post by Sue Bish » Sat, 19 Mar 1994 15:40:59


Quote:

> I am having a problem with pocket-gophers, and I was wondering if anyone
> had any ideas how to solve it.

> I own about 65 acres, about 30 of which is pasture.  Last spring I sold
> 30 acres on which I had alfalfa and rye.  The soil on those fields is
> a sandy-loam mix so it provided an excellent environment for the pocket-
> gophers to live in.  As the developers started moving dirt around on the
> fields, the pocket-gophers have moved their colony into my pastures.
> This by its self would probably not be too bad, but the problem comes at
> night, when foxes come to hunt them.  As soon as it gets dark, the foxes
> start digging out the pocket-gopher holes, and they will work at it until
> dawn digging between 25-40 holes.  Along with the hole digging, the horses
> I have in these pastures tend to get very scared and run through fences, when
> there are 6 or 7 foxes prowling among them at night.

> When the pocket-gophers were in the alfalfa fields I kept the fox population
> down by shooting them at night, after I cut a section of the alfalfa
> fields.  This is no longer an option, becauses homes are being built on
> both side of my property, and the owners have a slight dislike for a shotgun
> going off at 3:00am.

> So, as I see it, if I get rid of the pocket-gophers; the foxes will leave,
> the horses will stop running through fences, and the neighbors will get off
> my back.  The pasture covers about 30 acres, so trapping or shooting the
> pocket-gophers is out.

> Any ideas would greatly be appreciated.

Get yourself a terrier or a Border Collie.  Both breeds are GREAT at
'gophering', will keep at it during the daytime hours when the horses can
see them and will eventually clear them all out.  We don't have a problem
with gophers here in Ohio but our neighbor's Border Collie spends hours in
the local fields digging out field mice and rats.

Sue

- Show quoted text -

Quote:

>            Rick


 
 
 

Major problem...need help.

Post by Don Zefti » Sun, 20 Mar 1994 00:14:35

Well, today I was held prisoner for about 20 minutes by my new boots.

Everyone at my barn has recommended "Cavallos" and then proceeded to say - It only
took me about 2 months to break them in but now there soooooo comfortable- or - My
blisters only bled a couple of times while I was breaking in my new boots.   I'm
sure you've all heard the stories.

So, of course, given these recommendations I bought a pair and what better way to
break them in then to wear them while working around the house.  I could only find
one boot pull but that was no problem.  I bent the handle on the aquarium fish net
and that worked fine as the other pull.  Only a little snug going on so I now head
down the cellar steps to do some laundry sort of*** onto the bannister.  New
boots are sure snug and slippery and feeling a little tighter than I had anticipated.  
Better take them off.  Just a little pull - Ahem, maybe a bigger tug.  Boy! These
things should come with a warning that you shouldn't operate them while alone.  You're
probably wondering why I haven't used a boot jack by now - you know that thing I never
needed until right now.   I managed some moves that would have looked right at home in
a 3 stooges routine - like laying on my back and trying to hook my boot on the rail
between our living room and kitchen, taking the cushions off the sofa and trying to
find a spot on the sofa arm to wedge my heel in.  The corner of the cellar steps
finally worked just as I was contemplating what my husband would say if I called him
at work to plead with him to come home an help me out of my boots.

Anyway, I was just wondering if any of you have any good ideas  on accelerating boot
break in time.  My trainer suggested nylons to help the boots slip on and off a little
easier after laughing about what had happened.

Oh,  I guess you know you're a horse person when you're husband walks into the bedroom
and sees you  wearing your underwear and tall black boots and  his only comment is "Oh,
did the new boots finally arrive?"

Gwen  and  Laney
--

Clinical Diagnostics Division - Eastman Kodak Company Inc., Rochester, NY
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
The views expressed herein do not reflect those of Eastman Kodak Company Inc.

 
 
 

Major problem...need help.

Post by Lisa Alison Lomba » Mon, 21 Mar 1994 08:04:13

: Well, today I was held prisoner for about 20 minutes by my new boots.
: Everyone at my barn has recommended "Cavallos" and then proceeded to say -
: It only took me about 2 months to break them in but now there soooooo
: comfortable- or - My blisters only bled a couple of times while I was
: breaking in my new boots.   I'm sure you've all heard the stories.

: So, of course, given these recommendations I bought a pair and what better
: way to break them in then to wear them while working around the house.  I
: could only find one boot pull but that was no problem.  I bent the handle on
: the aquarium fish net
: and that worked fine as the other pull.  Only a little snug going on so I
: now head down the cellar steps to do some laundry sort of*** onto the
: bannister.  New boots are sure snug and slippery and feeling a little
: tighter than I had anticipated.  
: Better take them off.  Just a little pull - Ahem, maybe a bigger tug.  Boy!
: These things should come with a warning that you shouldn't operate them
: while alone

        I learned this rule when I first got my new boots in the mail (I tried
them on at the store, but they had to send me a special size).  I was living
in the ba***t floor of a dormatory for the summer, and was sooo e***d to
get my new boots, I tried them on right after work.  *TUG*  Hmm, these are a
bit snug. . . *TUG* *TUG*  hmmm- these weren't _that_ tight at the store. Then
the light dawned on me- THEY SENT ME THE WRONG CALF SIZE.  Ok, I'll use my
handy dandy new boot jack- no dice.  I was totally stuck.  To make a long
story short, I went hobbling up the dorm stairs, with the half-donned boot
flopping around, to a friend's room to help.  I spent the next 20 minutes
holding onto a radiator as two very large (non-horsey) men tried to free me.
They never looked at me the same again. . . :^)  *Sigh* what I do for my sport.
I later heard someone saying that she saw some strange woman with tights and
one black boot on around the dorm that afternoon. . .

        Anyway, to break in new boots, I suggest the following exercise:
put your toes on the edge of a step, and lift yourself up and down -really
helps to loosen up the ankle (and stretch your Achilles' tendon as an added
bonus).

        Good Luck!

Lisa (who _really_ needs Spring Break!) and

(GO AMHERST!)

 
 
 

Major problem...need help.

Post by Terry Von Gea » Mon, 21 Mar 1994 12:20:20

Quote:

>I am having a problem with pocket-gophers, and I was wondering if anyone
>had any ideas how to solve it.

>I own about 65 acres, about 30 of which is pasture.  Last spring I sold
>30 acres on which I had alfalfa and rye.  The soil on those fields is
>a sandy-loam mix so it provided an excellent environment for the pocket-
>gophers to live in.  As the developers started moving dirt around on the
>fields, the pocket-gophers have moved their colony into my pastures.
>This by its self would probably not be too bad, but the problem comes at
>night, when foxes come to hunt them.  As soon as it gets dark, the foxes
>start digging out the pocket-gopher holes, and they will work at it until
>dawn digging between 25-40 holes.  Along with the hole digging, the horses
>I have in these pastures tend to get very scared and run through fences, when
>there are 6 or 7 foxes prowling among them at night.

>When the pocket-gophers were in the alfalfa fields I kept the fox population
>down by shooting them at night, after I cut a section of the alfalfa
>fields.  This is no longer an option, becauses homes are being built on
>both side of my property, and the owners have a slight dislike for a shotgun
>going off at 3:00am.

>So, as I see it, if I get rid of the pocket-gophers; the foxes will leave,
>the horses will stop running through fences, and the neighbors will get off
>my back.  The pasture covers about 30 acres, so trapping or shooting the
>pocket-gophers is out.

>Any ideas would greatly be appreciated.

I'm not all that sure just what a pocket gopher might be but if it's
anything like a prairie dog the only way to effectively get rid of
the little ***s is to poison them.  Some years ago in Colorado,
the state weenie in charge of such things sent me 5 pounds of
strychnine flavored oats.  You set them out like maybe 3 or 4 oats
around each burrow.  Since you are using such a minute amount of
bait you do right out there with the horses, cattle, or what have
you.  In one morning I completely cleared a pasture of the ***
little creatures.  This was many years ago and I'm sure that
nowadays it's not so easy to procure the poison bait.  The people
making the rules seem to all live in condos and perhaps have seen a
picture of a rural area.  Seems a damn shame.  But you're
serious about getting rid of them, poison works great.  

Terry

 
 
 

Major problem...need help.

Post by Ron Co » Tue, 22 Mar 1994 14:31:27

A new toxic bait has been developed to control pocket gophers.
Contact J.T. Eaton & Co
        Twinsburg, Ohio

The bait is a paraffinized mixture of grains and attractants that
is formed into a block that fits easily into the gopher burrow.
It is moisture resistant, and will remain palatable for an
extended period of time.

This information quoted from Alberta Farm Life, March 14, 1994

--
R. Cole

 
 
 

Major problem...need help.

Post by BUR.. » Tue, 22 Mar 1994 17:45:00


Quote:

>Well, today I was held prisoner for about 20 minutes by my new boots.
>find a spot on the sofa arm to wedge my heel in.  The corner of the cellar steps
>finally worked just as I was contemplating what my husband would say if I called him
>at work to plead with him to come home an help me out of my boots.
>Anyway, I was just wondering if any of you have any good ideas  on accelerating boot
>break in time.  My trainer suggested nylons to help the boots slip on and off a little
>easier after laughing about what had happened.

         You might want to try dusting the inside ***with baby powder
         before slipping them on.  This helps them slide off easier and
         will keep the boots smelling better over time (not that you
         would ever have a boot-odor problem - of course)  I have also
         experienced stuck-boot anxiety while home alone (trying to see NY
         if my custom boots still fit after I had my baby)  I finally
         resorted to lying on my back with my feet in the air for
         20 minutes then hurriedly using the boot jack before the
         *** returned (at least that was my logic at the time)

 
 
 

Major problem...need help.

Post by Debbie Levi » Wed, 23 Mar 1994 03:25:58


Quote:

>[...]easier after laughing about what had happened.

I got a great laugh out of this.  How about a thread on Boot Horror
Stories?  :-)  BTW, boot slip-on is another one of those great
random uses for ShowSheen, the WD40 and duct tape of my grooming
kit!

I once had a pair of stock boots that had this un-stetch-able
full leather lining.  They were tight when I bought them and never got any
looser!  I tried having them stretched after about 6 months of
wearing them and the tack shop gave up in despair.  I always wore
them with only thin nylons, used lots of boot slip on, etc. etc.
These are the boots I had during my Intercollegiate show career
and I went through the following machinations for each show:
1) no salt for 2 days before the show.  2) rather few liquids
the night before the show.  3) as SOON as the car got to the
show grounds the boots went on (I could always get them on
first thing -- it was dicey later in the day).  4) As soon
as possible after riding the boots came off (whew!) and
I drank lots of water.  I hope I *never* have a pair of
boots like these again!   A year or so (and about 5 lbs)
later, I tried to wear them for a schooling show, got
the right boot stuck half on, hobbled around in intense
pain looking for help, eventually managed to find a
cadre of volunteer to help pull the boot off and barely
avoided having to *cut* the thing off.  I was almost beginning
to look forward to mangling it!
----------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                                           /__\ ) \
                                                          / \ / \_
"Argue for your limitations, and sure enough, they're yours!"  R. Bach

 
 
 

Major problem...need help.

Post by Lori Kow » Wed, 23 Mar 1994 08:03:31

Rick,

I don't know how to get rid of those little pests, but was given an idea
on how to keep others from moving in.

On the side of the field that you have the pocket gophers put colored
plastic from the ground up about 1.5 feet. The gophers can't see across
the fence line and will leave you alone. This is a real pain, but the
gophers are probably worse.

Good Luck