Stop or Whoa command

Stop or Whoa command

Post by Charli » Fri, 11 Aug 2000 04:00:00


My husband recently decided to double our horse population.  The horses he
decided to buy are 2 registered 6 yo paint mares and a 4 yo QH gelding.
When we went to look at the horses my husband made me test drive the horses
since he currently has a broken leg.  When I rode the blue roan paint mare I
had trouble making her go at first.  I would cluck to her like I do with my
horses and she would slow down instead of speed up.  Of course after some
frustration the guy who owned her explained to me the commands she was
taught.  Here they are:

The cluck sound was for back up (see the confusion?).
The kiss sound was for go forward.
For stop he would use Shhhhhhhh.

These seem very unusual to me.  Are these common commands for these actions?
After getting used to it I kind of like the Shhhhhh for stop.  It is a very
distinctly different sound and boy do these horses stop when you make that
sound.  The cluck for back up however, I have a hard time with.

The only down side to these horses is that he trained them with spurs so a
light touch with your heal doesn't work well.  I'm used to my horse that
responds to a very light touch to make him speed up or change gears.

Charlie

 
 
 

Stop or Whoa command

Post by AlaTmP » Fri, 11 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:
Charlie writes:
>The only down side to these horses is that he trained them with spurs so a

light touch with your heal doesn't work well.  I'm used to my horse that
responds to a very light touch to make him speed up or change gears.

So you bought horses you don't know how to ride?  ROFL

Ever consider taking lessons?

Bill

"Light travels faster than sound.
This is why some people appear bright
until you hear them speak."

 
 
 

Stop or Whoa command

Post by Joyce Reynolds-Wa » Fri, 11 Aug 2000 04:00:00

On Thu, 10 Aug 2000 10:05:28 -0700, "Charlie"

snip

Quote:
>The cluck sound was for back up (see the confusion?).
>The kiss sound was for go forward.
>For stop he would use Shhhhhhhh.
>These seem very unusual to me.  Are these common commands for these actions?
>After getting used to it I kind of like the Shhhhhh for stop.  It is a very
>distinctly different sound and boy do these horses stop when you make that
>sound.  The cluck for back up however, I have a hard time with.

This is what's annoying about someone who uses oddball commands to
train his horses.  No, they're not common, except for perhaps the kiss
and that tends to be more frequent for the canter/lope rather than any
other forward transition.

jrw

 
 
 

Stop or Whoa command

Post by Deborah Stevenso » Fri, 11 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:

> This is what's annoying about someone who uses oddball commands to
> train his horses.  No, they're not common, except for perhaps the kiss
> and that tends to be more frequent for the canter/lope rather than any
> other forward transition.

Dunno its origins (South American, maybe?) and spread, but Barbara
Woodhouse made a big deal out of the Shh for Whoa thing.


Who'll stop but not shush in Champaign, IL, USA

 
 
 

Stop or Whoa command

Post by Donna Patt » Fri, 11 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

>On Thu, 10 Aug 2000 10:05:28 -0700, "Charlie"

>snip

>>The cluck sound was for back up (see the confusion?).
>>The kiss sound was for go forward.
>>For stop he would use Shhhhhhhh.

>>These seem very unusual to me.  Are these common commands for these actions?
>>After getting used to it I kind of like the Shhhhhh for stop.  It is a very
>>distinctly different sound and boy do these horses stop when you make that
>>sound.  The cluck for back up however, I have a hard time with.

>This is what's annoying about someone who uses oddball commands to
>train his horses.  No, they're not common, except for perhaps the kiss
>and that tends to be more frequent for the canter/lope rather than any
>other forward transition.

>jrw

It would be nice to let the buyer know about those oddball commands :-}

One reason for doing this is to keep from being sabotaged in the show ring.
There are some competitors around here (older folks, not the ***age bunch)
who will come up behind another horse in a western pleasure class and make
a soft clucking sound specifically to get the other horse to go faster.
Then they (the clucker) will not have to pass the slower horse and look
like they are going "too fast". I know this is what happens because I've
heard the bragging and guffawing . . .

 
 
 

Stop or Whoa command

Post by Charli » Fri, 11 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Quote:
> Charlie writes:

> >The only down side to these horses is that he trained them with spurs so
a
> light touch with your heal doesn't work well.  I'm used to my horse that
> responds to a very light touch to make him speed up or change gears.

> So you bought horses you don't know how to ride?  ROFL

> Ever consider taking lessons?

No, I bought horses that were trained a little different than I am used to.
Horses can be retrained can't they?  Are you suggesting that I need to take
lessons every time I buy a horse that someone trained a little bit
differently than I would or am accustomed to?

Charlie

Quote:

> Bill

> "Light travels faster than sound.
> This is why some people appear bright
> until you hear them speak."

 
 
 

Stop or Whoa command

Post by Charli » Fri, 11 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Quote:


> >On Thu, 10 Aug 2000 10:05:28 -0700, "Charlie"

> >snip

> >>The cluck sound was for back up (see the confusion?).
> >>The kiss sound was for go forward.
> >>For stop he would use Shhhhhhhh.

> >>These seem very unusual to me.  Are these common commands for these
actions?
> >>After getting used to it I kind of like the Shhhhhh for stop.  It is a
very
> >>distinctly different sound and boy do these horses stop when you make
that
> >>sound.  The cluck for back up however, I have a hard time with.

> >This is what's annoying about someone who uses oddball commands to
> >train his horses.  No, they're not common, except for perhaps the kiss
> >and that tends to be more frequent for the canter/lope rather than any
> >other forward transition.

> >jrw

> It would be nice to let the buyer know about those oddball commands :-}

> One reason for doing this is to keep from being sabotaged in the show
ring.
> There are some competitors around here (older folks, not the ***age
bunch)
> who will come up behind another horse in a western pleasure class and make
> a soft clucking sound specifically to get the other horse to go faster.
> Then they (the clucker) will not have to pass the slower horse and look
> like they are going "too fast". I know this is what happens because I've
> heard the bragging and guffawing . . .

So there is where you would be at an advantage to have your horse trained to
back for the cluck sount :):):)

Charlie

- Show quoted text -

 
 
 

Stop or Whoa command

Post by AlaTmP » Fri, 11 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:

> Ever consider taking lessons?
>>No, I bought horses that were trained a little different than I am used to.

Horses can be retrained can't they?

Why***up a horse that is already trained?  

Quote:
>> Are you suggesting that I need to take

lessons every time I buy a horse that someone trained a little bit differently
than I would or am accustomed to?

The horse sounds like it has more training than you do.  If so, why not
accomodate the horse rather than bringing the horse down to your level.

JMO

Bill

"Light travels faster than sound.
This is why some people appear bright
until you hear them speak."

 
 
 

Stop or Whoa command

Post by Jane H. Kilbe » Fri, 11 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

>My husband recently decided to double our horse population.  The horses he
>decided to buy are 2 registered 6 yo paint mares and a 4 yo QH gelding.
>When we went to look at the horses my husband made me test drive the horses
>since he currently has a broken leg.  When I rode the blue roan paint mare I
>had trouble making her go at first.  I would cluck to her like I do with my
>horses and she would slow down instead of speed up.  Of course after some
>frustration the guy who owned her explained to me the commands she was
>taught.  Here they are:

>The cluck sound was for back up (see the confusion?).
>The kiss sound was for go forward.
>For stop he would use Shhhhhhhh.

>These seem very unusual to me.  Are these common commands for these actions?
>After getting used to it I kind of like the Shhhhhh for stop.  It is a very
>distinctly different sound and boy do these horses stop when you make that
>sound.  The cluck for back up however, I have a hard time with.

>The only down side to these horses is that he trained them with spurs so a
>light touch with your heal doesn't work well.  I'm used to my horse that
>responds to a very light touch to make him speed up or change gears.

Easy enough to teach the horse your commands. Simply piggy-back the
commands (the ones the horse knows with yours) and gradually replace the
old command with the new one.

A good rider is one who is flexible and can ride many different types of
horses. Consider it a challenge for you.

down the spotted trails. . . in the great nation of Tejas
jane h. kilberg and her gang of spots (GOS)
member: ApHC, Montgomery County *** Horse Committee
editor/publisher: Appaloosa Network

 
 
 

Stop or Whoa command

Post by Joyce Reynolds-Wa » Sat, 12 Aug 2000 04:00:00



snip

Quote:
>One reason for doing this is to keep from being sabotaged in the show ring.

Which doesn't say much for the rider's ability if they can't keep the
horse's attention focused on *them*, not other riders or horses.

If the rider's any good, they won't need to mess around with different
signals in order to avoid being sabotaged.  But to do so means they
need to be able to read their critter and stop any reaction before it
starts.

Quote:
>There are some competitors around here (older folks, not the ***age bunch)
>who will come up behind another horse in a western pleasure class and make
>a soft clucking sound specifically to get the other horse to go faster.
>Then they (the clucker) will not have to pass the slower horse and look
>like they are going "too fast". I know this is what happens because I've
>heard the bragging and guffawing . . .

Doesn't work with a well-trained horse and rider.  

Or shouldn't, anyway.

jrw

 
 
 

Stop or Whoa command

Post by AlaTmP » Sat, 12 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:
JRW writes:
>If the rider's any good, they won't need to mess around with different signals

in order to avoid being sabotaged.

Some of the ammy classes are nothing more than packer classes or *** leadline
classes w/o the leadline.  

Quote:
>But to do so means they need to be able to read their critter and stop any

reaction before it
starts.

Surely you jest.  They didn't spend all that money to learn anything, they
spent it to win.

Bill

"Light travels faster than sound.
This is why some people appear bright
until you hear them speak."

 
 
 

Stop or Whoa command

Post by Charli » Sat, 12 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

> > Ever consider taking lessons?

> >>No, I bought horses that were trained a little different than I am used
to.
> Horses can be retrained can't they?

> Why***up a horse that is already trained?

How is teaching a horse to respond to a lighter touch rather than a heavy
kick screwing it up?

Quote:

> >> Are you suggesting that I need to take
> lessons every time I buy a horse that someone trained a little bit
differently
> than I would or am accustomed to?

> The horse sounds like it has more training than you do.  If so, why not
> accomodate the horse rather than bringing the horse down to your level.

So teaching the horse to go forward with a much lighter touch is bringing it
down ??????  If a horse is trained to only go forward if you kick it with
all your might than you should accomidate that rather than train it to go
forward with a light touch of your heal??

Bill you amaze me.  You seem to only want to pick a fight.  I'm sorry but I
prefer to have a horse respond to a light touch and I don't(will not) wear
spurs.

Charlie

Quote:

> JMO

> Bill

> "Light travels faster than sound.
> This is why some people appear bright
> until you hear them speak."

 
 
 

Stop or Whoa command

Post by Charli » Sat, 12 Aug 2000 04:00:00



Quote:


> Easy enough to teach the horse your commands. Simply piggy-back the
> commands (the ones the horse knows with yours) and gradually replace the
> old command with the new one.

> A good rider is one who is flexible and can ride many different types of
> horses. Consider it a challenge for you.

I can adjust to all but the cluck to back up command.  This is the opposite
of how my horses work.  It will be hard to swich between the two.  I
actually kind of like the Shhhhh to stop command now that I have gotten more
used to it.

Charlie

 
 
 

Stop or Whoa command

Post by Donna Patt » Sat, 12 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Quote:



>snip

>>One reason for doing this is to keep from being sabotaged in the show ring.

>Which doesn't say much for the rider's ability if they can't keep the
>horse's attention focused on *them*, not other riders or horses.

>If the rider's any good, they won't need to mess around with different
>signals in order to avoid being sabotaged.  But to do so means they
>need to be able to read their critter and stop any reaction before it
>starts.

Or they just need to learn to use correct cues and not rely so much on voice
cues :-}  When we were doing a lot of showing, we would practice riding
while other people around us were yelling "whoa!", "canter", etc. We made
sure that neither we nor the horses were paying attention to the ruckus
around us and the horses were responding to our cues, not to shouted commands.
My daughter was 8 or 9 at the time, and this really helped her in the show
ring.

Quote:

>>There are some competitors around here (older folks, not the ***age bunch)
>>who will come up behind another horse in a western pleasure class and make
>>a soft clucking sound specifically to get the other horse to go faster.
>>Then they (the clucker) will not have to pass the slower horse and look
>>like they are going "too fast". I know this is what happens because I've
>>heard the bragging and guffawing . . .

>Doesn't work with a well-trained horse and rider.  

>Or shouldn't, anyway.

As a friend says: "One minute there you are just cruising along thinking the
world is great. Then you look up and the whold world suddenly changes." ;->

I think the folks who use the clucking trick know who they can use it on.

Quote:

>jrw

 
 
 

Stop or Whoa command

Post by J.A. Zan » Sat, 12 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:

>I can adjust to all but the cluck to back up command.  This is the opposite
>of how my horses work.

This horse must be able to do a back up with seat and hand only, right?  I'd
just stop clucking and let him figure it out from there.  Or, substitute the
word "back" for a few times so he understands the clucking is ending forever.
It won't take long to retrain this.

Quote:
> It will be hard to swich between the two.  I
>actually kind of like the Shhhhh to stop command now that I have gotten
>more
>used to it.

Don't ride the horse differently, what would happen if you bought a new horse
*sight unseen* from the old trainer?  You would ride it and teach it your way
of going, end of conversation.  Don't get so worked up about what the horse
used to do and go forward to tomorrow.

Wanna see a confused horse?  Once my trainer got in an X-racehorse to retrain,
and sometimes Michel gives a soft whistle when he halts to ease the horse to a
halting.  You know what race horse's do when you whistle?  Stop_pee_whew_what a
halt!  He gave up whistling for a while.  :)  After a few months of retraining
you could whistle anywhere on the horse.

Retraining voice cues, or getting rid of them entirely is easy, give it time.

~Jaz.  J.A. Zanot
                ,;;;,                                  
     ,;( )_, )~\|                                    
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   ' ;   \;  \
oo.,? ?,.oooo.,? ?,.o
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