Training question- saddling problem

Training question- saddling problem

Post by Terry Atwel » Thu, 30 May 1996 04:00:00


I have a 3 year old Peruvian Paso that has been started under
saddle. He is still in bozal and can be ridden and is learning
quickly,but- my major problem is that he is hard to saddle. He
tries to pull back from his tie points and shifts around. As
soon as he sees the blanket he starts getting disturbed. I've
tried introducing the blanket to him slowly and most everything
else but haven't had any luck.Once the saddle is on his back he
is ok. If anyone has experience with this aspect of training a
young horse I could sure use some tips. Thanks.

 
 
 

Training question- saddling problem

Post by Pamela Campbel » Fri, 31 May 1996 04:00:00

Quote:

> I have a 3 year old Peruvian Paso that has been started under
> saddle. He is still in bozal and can be ridden and is learning
> quickly,but- my major problem is that he is hard to saddle. He
> tries to pull back from his tie points and shifts around.

I have a 3 year old QH gelding that used to be the same way when I
first started him.  Alot of it I think is that they do not like to
stand still-they have better things to than to watch you take your sweet
time saddling them :) So the key thing here I would say is "Patience"
and this is something that they have to teach themselves.  My horse
learned this best by waiting on me.  I would tie him in a good safe area
outside, in the barn or in the areana for periods at a time.  This
taught him to wait, and have patience.  I Would do this at random times
but especially before and after I worked him.

Quote:
> soon as he sees the blanket he starts getting disturbed. I've
> tried introducing the blanket to him slowly and most everything
> else but haven't had any luck.

When he does this, I would still stay patient with him but  doing it a
few times with the blanket in a row, repetition.   This will show him
that your not trying to hurt him, but on the other-hand are not going to
allow his "fuss" to stop your task.

--

Gregory Consulting: http://www.gregcons.com
Quarter Horse World http://www.quarterworld.com
"Devoted to the Quarter Horse Industry"

 
 
 

Training question- saddling problem

Post by DBlackb1 » Sun, 02 Jun 1996 04:00:00

My 2yr old used to do the same thing.  The keyword is Patience.  Try
letting him smell the blanket and then just wait until he calms down.  The
rub the blanket on his neck..wait for him to calm down..then his withers,
etc.  It will take  a while to saddle him but you shouldn't have to do it
more than once or twice.  Try taking the blanket off and on several times
before you go for the saddle.  I also would saddle and unsaddle my two
year old without riding sometimes.  They just need to learn patience and
that fussing doesn't get them out of riding.  Good luck.

 
 
 

Training question- saddling problem

Post by Jane H. Kilber » Mon, 03 Jun 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

>I have a 3 year old Peruvian Paso that has been started under
>saddle. He is still in bozal and can be ridden and is learning
>quickly,but- my major problem is that he is hard to saddle. He
>tries to pull back from his tie points and shifts around. As
>soon as he sees the blanket he starts getting disturbed. I've
>tried introducing the blanket to him slowly and most everything
>else but haven't had any luck.Once the saddle is on his back he
>is ok. If anyone has experience with this aspect of training a
>young horse I could sure use some tips. Thanks.

Sounds like he skipped a grade. Go back to ground tying and sacking out.
When you sack out a horse, use a long lead so you can give and take.
Approach the horse with a rope or blanket etc. Sometimes it's easier to
use something smaller first like a piece of cloth, then go to a bath
towel, then graduate to a beach size towel then the saddle blanket, then
a pad, then keep on going to a horse sheet or blanket. Same idea with a
saddle (hard stuff).

When you sack out a horse, you start where the horse feels comfortable.
For example, his legs or chest or even let him smell it on the ground in
front of him. Pick it up then drop it in front of him. He may move back a
step or two, but let him relax first then ask him to approach again with
the object. Rub it all over his body including ears, face, but, belly,
back, legs and so on. With towels and cloths you can even get to the
point of throwing it over their faces and ears. A coiled rope is good too
cause you can bring it up and touch the horse with it and rub it all over
him. Don't move onto the next object until your horse is relaxed and
unconcerned.

Some folks begin the sacking out process with a lead rope attached to a
halter then turn the horse loose in a small corral so he gets use to
things flying and wrapping around his legs or even stepping on it.

Sacking out stuff can be tarps, plastic & canvas; bed sheets; pillow
cases; burlap or paper feed sacks; a water hose; grocery sacks or
whatever you have handy around the barn/house/garage. It usually takes
about 3 days to totally sack out a horse. After that, you can put
anything ya like on them and it's ho hum time.

Sack out sessions can be short or long depending on the horse and how
long you want to work at it. Generally I mess with the horse about an
hour. Some are smart and I can go through my repertoire in a very short
period of time. The second day is re-inforcement or review and the third
day is just ot make sure lesson is learned.

One yougster (age 3) I started for his owner went through the sack out
process. The owner came for his lesson and he questioned me about his
horse's "permanent" learning skills about not freaking out everytime
something new was introduced. I looked around and saw Sabaca, my white
shepherd puppy. Hey, I said, let's see. I picked up Sabaca and put her on
his back. The horse looked at the puppy who was trying to figure out how
to stay on and way squirming to get a paw hold. The horse watched Sabaca
for a few seconds, then lowered his head and began eating grass.

Sacking out also is a good foundation for teaching your horse to spook in
place which comes in handy when ya'll run into some grazed horse-eating
monster that's determined to get ya.

Hope this helps, and have fun.

down the sunny trails . . .
jane kilberg and her gang of spotted 4 legged critters at the
rocking double j ranch in the great nation of Tejas
member of ApHC, Sundance '500' Int'l (Appaloosa appreciation society)
Montgomery County *** Horse Committee