Handy-dandy Commands for Green Horses.

Handy-dandy Commands for Green Horses.

Post by Brian Whatcot » Wed, 10 May 2006 12:25:13


I have been a little slow with a couple of minor training chores.
1) StandStill is handy before currying and brushing prior to  first
saddling up
2)  HeadDown is handy before first bridling.

I am just getting the three  horses into these two commands now.
Late, I know.
Shuffling is just a plain nuisance, and I found it increased when I
was currying out winter coats. It evidently is not specially
comfortable.

Head lifting, even defensive half rearing is much better avoided
altogether (as I now realise)
Still a HeadDown command starts showing results on the very first
session I was pleased to see.    Just moderate down pressure on the
halter until and only until an observable head drop. And repeat.

I will know better, next time.

Brian Whatcott   Altus OK

 
 
 

Handy-dandy Commands for Green Horses.

Post by RPM1 » Wed, 10 May 2006 19:38:33

"Brian Whatcott"

Quote:
> I have been a little slow with a couple of minor training chores.
> 1) StandStill is handy before currying and brushing prior to  first
> saddling up
> 2)  HeadDown is handy before first bridling.

I'd add a simple whistle every time something nice is going to happen;
every time you feed or bring out treats...  Make it a tune not common
for birds in your area. They'll know, when they hear that certain whistle,
to come to YOU for something GOOD.  Once they know it, they'll come
to you like little robots when you pucker up & blow.  I've seen it work
even when the horse is adrenalin fueled - like when your horse breaks free
and is heading for the Interstate.  ;->

RCM

 
 
 

Handy-dandy Commands for Green Horses.

Post by Brian Whatcot » Thu, 11 May 2006 02:04:08



Quote:
>"Brian Whatcott"
>> I have been a little slow with a couple of minor training chores.
>> 1) StandStill is handy before currying and brushing prior to  first
>> saddling up
>> 2)  HeadDown is handy before first bridling.

>I'd add a simple whistle every time something nice is going to happen;
>every time you feed or bring out treats...  Make it a tune not common
>for birds in your area. They'll know, when they hear that certain whistle,
>to come to YOU for something GOOD.  Once they know it, they'll come
>to you like little robots when you pucker up & blow.  I've seen it work
>even when the horse is adrenalin fueled - like when your horse breaks free
>and is heading for the Interstate.  ;->

>RCM

I watched the Saturday matinees too, as a kid, and I have been
whistling for the herd to come. From a quarter mile away, they will
amble over, if the lead mare leads, that is. But not always.

In other words, I have not been focussing the signal half well enough.

On the other hand, if I call a horse out of the gate, while I walk
another back in, the free horse stops to graze immediately.

Prairie horses are always somewhat hungry, I think. That's why they
spend time grazing, after all.

 But on this fresh field, there is a five wire fence with succulent
bushes and long grass the other side.    The pretty white horse had
some fresh fence rash yesterday, I noticed. She had her head through
the wires.

I'm not even sure how I could arrange an electric wire to keep them
away. Perhaps the suggestion of an electrified four or five wire is
the best.
But I haven't seen metal tee fence insulators - they must be around.

Brian Whatcott    Altus OK

 
 
 

Handy-dandy Commands for Green Horses.

Post by Jan Flor » Tue, 13 May 2008 01:36:10



Quote:


> >"Brian Whatcott"

   [...]

Quote:
>  But on this fresh field, there is a five wire fence with succulent
> bushes and long grass the other side.    The pretty white horse had
> some fresh fence rash yesterday, I noticed. She had her head through
> the wires.

> I'm not even sure how I could arrange an electric wire to keep them
> away. Perhaps the suggestion of an electrified four or five wire is
> the best.
> But I haven't seen metal tee fence insulators - they must be around.

> Brian Whatcott    Altus OK

Just spotted this while cleaning out old posts --

They make t-post insulators now. Jeffers carries them for wire and tape.

We did a quick and dirty hotwire on the 10 acre pasture next to my house
for emergency grazing for the neighbor's herd a couple of years ago. It
didn't take long to rig.

   Jan, back to lurk mode

 
 
 

Handy-dandy Commands for Green Horses.

Post by Brian Whatcot » Tue, 13 May 2008 03:31:07



Quote:
>>  But on this fresh field, there is a five wire fence with succulent
>> bushes and long grass the other side.    The pretty white horse had
>> some fresh fence rash yesterday, I noticed. She had her head through
>> the wires.
>> I'm not even sure how I could arrange an electric wire to keep them
>> away. Perhaps the suggestion of an electrified four or five wire is
>> the best.     But I haven't seen metal tee fence insulators - they must be around.

>> Brian Whatcott    Altus OK

>Just spotted this while cleaning out old posts --

>They make t-post insulators now. Jeffers carries them for wire and tape.

>We did a quick and dirty hotwire on the 10 acre pasture next to my house
>for emergency grazing for the neighbor's herd a couple of years ago. It
>didn't take long to rig.

Hi Jan, I think I had in mind the idea that a single stand off wire
from tee posts wouldn't stop these animals poking their head
though the lower strands. So it would take multi shock wires....
 But  sure enough I became familiar with the plastic clip on
stand-offs in the interim.   Buddy is now getting geared up to extend
his fancy PVC three rail fencing, now the County has been kind enough
to root out the overgrown (and frail) hedge trees round his property
on the roadside ea***t

Thanks for the thought.

Brian W

 
 
 

Handy-dandy Commands for Green Horses.

Post by Fran Brag » Tue, 13 May 2008 05:27:45


Quote:

>   Jan, back to lurk mode

Hey Jan!  Thought about you last night when I saw a show called Alaska
Experiment on Discovery (AFAICR)  Hope you are doing well!  Is your calving
season done yet?

Fran

 
 
 

Handy-dandy Commands for Green Horses.

Post by Jan Flor » Tue, 13 May 2008 10:37:03



Quote:



> >   Jan, back to lurk mode

> Hey Jan!  Thought about you last night when I saw a show called Alaska
> Experiment on Discovery (AFAICR)  Hope you are doing well!  Is your calving
> season done yet?

> Fran

We're still calving. Almost done, but not quite. We'll drive the herd
down to the grazing lease tomorrow, if the weather lays down a little.
(It's spitting snow right now and blowing a hooley. It's a late/cold
spring.)

Did you catch "Tougher in Alaska" on History on May 8? That's a neighbor
doing the show. Geo Beach. I missed it, since we don't have satellite
and the weather was too crummy to go to town to watch it. Geo told me
that they didn't go to Chicken, AK where I used to be a gold miner, so I
was pretty disappointed about that, but they did go to Nome and show the
L/C Rama Lee with a weird dredge. I used to crew on that boat.

Is the Alaska Experiment where they took people from Kansas and put them
in a cabin at Icy Bay? I've heard it's a hoot. My gf said they gave the
people a *really* nice cabin to stay in.

I've missed you muggles. Decided to come back and see what you're up to.

When that filly busted her pasterns in the Derby, I came back to see
what you guys would have to say about it. Thank Goddess I missed
watching the race. I normally would have gone to town in my Big Hat to
watch it with my GF's in their Big Hat's at the local tavern. (It's a
local tradition.) It was also my birthday, so I'm really glad I missed
it.

We've still got the same two broncs we had last time I check in here...

   Jan

 
 
 

Handy-dandy Commands for Green Horses.

Post by Fran Brag » Tue, 13 May 2008 21:54:22


Quote:

> Did you catch "Tougher in Alaska" on History on May 8? That's a neighbor
> doing the show. Geo Beach. I missed it, since we don't have satellite
> and the weather was too crummy to go to town to watch it. Geo told me
> that they didn't go to Chicken, AK where I used to be a gold miner, so I
> was pretty disappointed about that, but they did go to Nome and show the
> L/C Rama Lee with a weird dredge. I used to crew on that boat.

I missed that one!  Maybe they will repeat it.

Quote:
> Is the Alaska Experiment where they took people from Kansas and put them
> in a cabin at Icy Bay? I've heard it's a hoot. My gf said they gave the
> people a *really* nice cabin to stay in.

That's the one!  There are 3 teams of folks actually.  Varying degrees of
skills.  Some are only living in a tent.  I've only seen a couple of
episodes but it's very interesting to see how people prioritize.  They have
to learn to preserve food, gather wood for the coming Winter, etc.  One team
only has a .22 to hunt with.  They tried to bring down a bison....  One
spent a full day making a crab trap.  How many crabs would you have to catch
to last through Winter?

Quote:

> I've missed you muggles. Decided to come back and see what you're up to.

> When that filly busted her pasterns in the Derby, I came back to see
> what you guys would have to say about it. Thank Goddess I missed
> watching the race. I normally would have gone to town in my Big Hat to
> watch it with my GF's in their Big Hat's at the local tavern. (It's a
> local tradition.) It was also my birthday, so I'm really glad I missed
> it.

I was watching the race at the local watering hole with my boarders.  It's a
shame.  You know when I worked at the track, for 2 years back in the 80's, I
never once saw a horse break down in any of the races my horses were in.
Now it seems one breaks down in every race I see!  Maybe it was because my
cheap claimers were bigger boned, slower and usually older than 3.  I don't
know.  Something's got to change.  Breeding, training, combination of the
two.  Racing and Eventing were two of my favorite sports.  But they are
heading down a path that is past competitive and into stupid dangerous.  I
hope someone finds an answer and the sport can come back safer yet still
competitive.

Quote:
> We've still got the same two broncs we had last time I check in here...

You are one of the few folks I know whose horses have a 'real job'!  Best
wishes and hope your calves all arrive uneventfully!
Fran
 
 
 

Handy-dandy Commands for Green Horses.

Post by AKogle » Wed, 14 May 2008 07:23:56


Quote:



> > ? Jan, back to lurk mode

> Hey Jan! ?Thought about you last night when I saw a show called Alaska
> Experiment on Discovery (AFAICR) ?Hope you are doing well! ?Is your calving
> season done yet?

Funny, me too, when I saw the ad for Tougher in Alaska >;-> I  picture
Jan's life and wondered how 'real' the show would be. Glad to know its
the real deal.

Abby

 
 
 

Handy-dandy Commands for Green Horses.

Post by Jan Flor » Wed, 14 May 2008 18:21:47



Quote:



> > Did you catch "Tougher in Alaska" on History on May 8? That's a neighbor
> > doing the show. Geo Beach. I missed it, since we don't have satellite
> > and the weather was too crummy to go to town to watch it. Geo told me
> > that they didn't go to Chicken, AK where I used to be a gold miner, so I
> > was pretty disappointed about that, but they did go to Nome and show the
> > L/C Rama Lee with a weird dredge. I used to crew on that boat.

> I missed that one!  Maybe they will repeat it.

> > Is the Alaska Experiment where they took people from Kansas and put them
> > in a cabin at Icy Bay? I've heard it's a hoot. My gf said they gave the
> > people a *really* nice cabin to stay in.

> That's the one!  There are 3 teams of folks actually.  Varying degrees of
> skills.  Some are only living in a tent.  I've only seen a couple of
> episodes but it's very interesting to see how people prioritize.  They have
> to learn to preserve food, gather wood for the coming Winter, etc.  One team
> only has a .22 to hunt with.  They tried to bring down a bison....  One
> spent a full day making a crab trap.  How many crabs would you have to catch
> to last through Winter?

Crab meat doesn't have much fat in it. Alaska is a "fat starved"
country. That's why people ate so much salmon, seal, walrus, whatever
they could get, depending on where they lived, to get through. People in
the Interior had a hell of a time getting enough fat in their diets to
survive. It's pretty easy on the coast.

A .22 is a fine rifle, but you have to do a lot of hunting to feed
yourself with one, unless you can kill a moose or a black bear. A friend
of mine ends up living on caribou and Krusteze pancake mix in hungry
winters. (He's an old trapper.)

I take for granted everything I've learned up here from my SO and the
old timers, about living off the country. Those new people in the show
don't have anyone telling them what to do and what NOT to do. The NOT is
the most important thing. (I haven't seen the show yet, but I can
imagine. Alaska is a hard country. No malls. No corner grocery. If you
live off the land, you can get pretty hungry, if you don't know what
you're doing. I'd starve real quick, and I know what to eat and where to
find it. I'd still starve. Empathy for the wolf and the coyote comes
quickly, when you're good & hungry.)

- Show quoted text -

Quote:

> > I've missed you muggles. Decided to come back and see what you're up to.

> > When that filly busted her pasterns in the Derby, I came back to see
> > what you guys would have to say about it. Thank Goddess I missed
> > watching the race. I normally would have gone to town in my Big Hat to
> > watch it with my GF's in their Big Hat's at the local tavern. (It's a
> > local tradition.) It was also my birthday, so I'm really glad I missed
> > it.

> I was watching the race at the local watering hole with my boarders.  It's a
> shame.  You know when I worked at the track, for 2 years back in the 80's, I
> never once saw a horse break down in any of the races my horses were in.
> Now it seems one breaks down in every race I see!  Maybe it was because my
> cheap claimers were bigger boned, slower and usually older than 3.  I don't
> know.  Something's got to change.  Breeding, training, combination of the
> two.  Racing and Eventing were two of my favorite sports.  But they are
> heading down a path that is past competitive and into stupid dangerous.  I
> hope someone finds an answer and the sport can come back safer yet still
> competitive.

> > We've still got the same two broncs we had last time I check in here...

> You are one of the few folks I know whose horses have a 'real job'!  Best
> wishes and hope your calves all arrive uneventfully!
> Fran

Lots of calves, very few deaths this spring (touch wood). My horses are
still fatheads. We got an inch of snow last night. Even we were
surprised by that one.

Thanks for asking, Fran : )

   Jan

 
 
 

Handy-dandy Commands for Green Horses.

Post by J. Z. M » Thu, 15 May 2008 00:58:40


Quote:
> Crab meat doesn't have much fat in it. Alaska is a "fat starved"
> country. That's why people ate so much salmon, seal, walrus, whatever
> they could get, depending on where they lived, to get through. People in
> the Interior had a hell of a time getting enough fat in their diets to
> survive. It's pretty easy on the coast.

LOL don't you have Dunkin' donuts??????  I'd be able to find fat!  :)))

Jody

 
 
 

Handy-dandy Commands for Green Horses.

Post by Ocean of Nuanc » Thu, 15 May 2008 05:08:28

Quote:


>> Crab meat doesn't have much fat in it. Alaska is a "fat starved"
>> country. That's why people ate so much salmon, seal, walrus, whatever
>> they could get, depending on where they lived, to get through. People in
>> the Interior had a hell of a time getting enough fat in their diets to
>> survive. It's pretty easy on the coast.

> LOL don't you have Dunkin' donuts??????  I'd be able to find fat!  :)))

LOL!!!  Or any pizza place within a half day's drive would load you upon
enough lipid to get you through a winter above the Arctic Circle.  LOL.

sharon

 
 
 

Handy-dandy Commands for Green Horses.

Post by Tamara in T » Thu, 15 May 2008 10:19:11


Quote:

> I've missed you muggles. Decided to come back and see what you're up to.

well here in Semi Tropical Tn ain't nothing going on but the
rent...we
did kill a big ole fat pig for the firemen's BBQ findraiser that saved
the barn from burning down
in Jan....shot him here and skinned him out the old fashioned way...

I do fail to see why Calvin Howard felt the need to direct  _ME_ in
meat preparation...never ever
ever skin something out with your husband is my word of warning to any
young couple today....

there were three very annoyed "WOMAN !!" (s),
and two rebuttals that I had done this _in fact_ before I met him,
and one discussion as to how I had "mangled the bacons good",
and two times where I invited him to "finish it your self"

 it was kinda  comical  that the school bus drove past right as the
innards dropped into the
bucket....that was priceless...we decided that more money could have
been
 made  selling tickets to the skinning than at the actual BBQ...you'd
have thought a buncha
people were standing neekid in the yard the stares we drew...even four
hired guys clocked
out and just stood around..but it's a dying art here and we are pretty
hard up for entertainment

  I'm glad you're still around !

     Tamara in TN