Need advice-all on the front end

Need advice-all on the front end

Post by Maria Meiste » Wed, 21 Jun 1995 04:00:00


I have a Reg Appy mare (looks totally QT
though, Qt body, solid sorrel color).  She
has some distant Doc Bar and recent Fri
Dee Bar. Her problem is that she is hard
to get moving forward.  Sure, I have
utilized all the common aids: spurs,
lounging with a whip, ect . . . and they
work for awhile.  I get her going with
the aid and then finish the lesson without
it, but in time she becomes dead to the
aid and then to the new lesson as well.  
She is very dead sided!!  She has a lot
of potential, though, and is very
intelligent.  Someone just overused her
sides and she has obvoiusly been spurred,
kicked and proded so much that she just
ignores me!!  
My problem is that since I can't get her
moving forward, I can't even begin to
collect her and get her working off the
rear end.  I have tried taking her to a
field and letting a companion run ahead
a try to push her into a flat run, but
this doesn't even work.  She just lopes
on down the road, almost at a three beat.  
When I turn her lose she carelessly lopes
off, never running.  Some people wish for
a horse that wont take off all their lives
- now that I have one I can't stand it!!  
Like I said, it's not that I want her to
speed up, I need take her off her front
end and I can't get enough forward motion
to do so.
I have been feeding her supplements to try
to hyper her up a bit - it is having a small
effect.  She is only 8 years old and has not
been used for the 3 years previous to me
buying her.  She has a wonderful mouth and
very soft to turn, backup and stop.  Her
only problem is in the moving forward.  
Any suggestions??


 
 
 

Need advice-all on the front end

Post by SDLBREDF » Fri, 23 Jun 1995 04:00:00

Has someone in her past used (overused) draw reins??  Maybe she has
learned that people want her heavy on the forehand, through use of this
much-abused tool?  My pet peeve is people who use draw reins at all,
because most of them get so hungup on the head, that they forget to
maintain the motor!!!!

 
 
 

Need advice-all on the front end

Post by Mary La » Sat, 24 Jun 1995 04:00:00

Maria:

The last horse I sponsored was just like you described.  He was an
old (only 9 yrs. old) school horse.  You could stand there and beat
him with a bat or crop so hard you'd break it and he wouldn't even
flinch.  

My instructors were no help at this barn.  So I contacted an old
trainer.  She told me that he was just so used to getting beat up that
it didn't mean anything to him anymore.  She suggested a way to make
it meaningful:  Ask for forward movement by applying reasonable
pressure with the legs.  [Expect no response.]  Ask again, this time
increasing the pressure noticeably.  [Expect no response.]  Ask the
third time with big pressure and at the same time apply either the
spur or the crop.  If he increases his speed at all you've won.  

Just remember ... the first two times are warnings to him that the
third time will not feel good.  Let him get used to this so he knows
what to expect.  I would imagine this will be a long road for the both
of you.  But it sounds like he's just had too many harsh devices used
on him without him understanding the warning beforehand and just
*expects* harshness now.

Good luck!

--Mary

Concord, CA

 
 
 

Need advice-all on the front end

Post by Martha Selle » Sat, 24 Jun 1995 04:00:00

Quote:

>third time with big pressure and at the same time apply either the
>If he increases his speed at all you've won.  

And, don't punish any form of forward resulting from your
request.  If you ask for a walk-trot and he canters, it is
counter productive to yank him in the mouth.

Martha
--
Martha Sellers
Oakland, California

 
 
 

Need advice-all on the front end

Post by Eileen Kinl » Tue, 27 Jun 1995 04:00:00

<...snip...>

 She suggested a way to make
|> it meaningful:  Ask for forward movement by applying reasonable
|> pressure with the legs.  [Expect no response.]  Ask again, this time
|> increasing the pressure noticeably.  [Expect no response.]  Ask the
|> third time with big pressure and at the same time apply either the
|> spur or the crop.  If he increases his speed at all you've won.  
|>

But if you 'Expect no response', there's an even greater probability
that you will GET no response.  Remember the old 'throw your heart
over the fence and the horse will follow'.

Eileen
--
===========================================================================
Eileen Kinley         Bell-Northern Research           |opinions expressed

                      Ottawa, ON, CANADA  K1Y 4H7      |necessarily BNRs

 
 
 

Need advice-all on the front end

Post by BK4L » Tue, 27 Jun 1995 04:00:00

sounds like she's a bit bored.  does she jump ?  many horses find jumping
exciting, and a reward, esp if introduced to it in a non-threatening
manner.

what kind of bit are you using ? she may be overbitted, and need more of a
gentle, training bit .  glad to hear you're working on forward before
collection.

how about health care - teeth checked ? wormed say every 8 weeks ?
how is she shod ? maybe have your farrier watch her go - I have tremendous
respect for my farrier's eye for movement.
Watch out for the supplements - aside from the $$, one can cause health
problems by excess.  is she in good flesh ?  what kind of supplements are
you using - vitamins, electrolytes, corn oil ?  have you discussed this
with your vet?

If health is ok, I'd go all the way back to basics, soft snaffle bit
(maybe even ***), asking as quietly as possible - whisper, don't shout.
 And reward her
immediately and often for ANY compliance.

 
 
 

Need advice-all on the front end

Post by Claudia Arabas » Thu, 29 Jun 1995 04:00:00

Try lunging and teaching voice commands.  I am working this way to get my
horse to slow down.  It's quite efffective and doesn't involve hitting,
beating, kicking.  It's a rare horse that wno't move out on a lunge line when
you crack a lunge whip behind him.   Good luck.