hlter training question

hlter training question

Post by Allisa Nev » Wed, 06 Sep 1995 04:00:00


Hi there fellow rec.eq'ers!

I have a 3 month old mustang filly that I am halter breaking.
My problem is that when leading her she gets ahead of me and so I
end up having to circle her to get her back next to me.  She also
bumps into me when she spooks.  She is still nervous about being
handled, so I don't want to jeopardize the trust that she is
developing in me, but I don't want her to develop bad leading
manners either.  Does anyone have any suggestions of ways to
get her to walk next to me without making her head shy or
afraid of me?

Thanks!

Allisa

 
 
 

hlter training question

Post by HORSEMA » Wed, 06 Sep 1995 04:00:00

Allisa,

A lot of what you are looking for will come with time and a bit more
maturity.  When you consider the horse has had only 12 weeks in which to
see, recognize, and evaluate the world, the reactions you are encountering
are not surprising.

What I have done to keep the horse from surging ahead of me is to keep a
rather short lead line on them.  When the horse starts pulling, I hold
very steady and inflexible.  Often that resistance will keep them in what
I consider to be the acceptable area.  It has the advantage, too, of
automatically releasing the pressure when the horse stays put.

If that doesn't work, I'll moderately jerk the lead line when I'm being
tugged.  If a firmer response is required, I use it.  When the horse
returns to the acceptable area, I instantly release the pressure and speak
reassuringly, and reward with pats and touches.

Start with a larger "acceptable area" at first, gradually decreasing the
size as you both progress.  

To keep the horse from crowding me, I make a***with my thumb protruding
and poke the horse with my thumb when they encroach.  There is no pain,
here, but the sensation isn't pleasant.  When the horse returns to a safe
distance I reward with verbal warm words.

Most important, be patient.  They learn some natural things very quickly
(like where's the milk), but unnatural things like being led away from mom
will take a lot more time.

Hope my experience helps.



 
 
 

hlter training question

Post by Marcy Jackso » Wed, 06 Sep 1995 04:00:00


Quote:
(Allisa Neves) writes:

>Hi there fellow rec.eq'ers!

>I have a 3 month old mustang filly that I am halter breaking.
>My problem is that when leading her she gets ahead of me and so I
>end up having to circle her to get her back next to me.  She also
>bumps into me when she spooks.  She is still nervous about being
>handled, so I don't want to jeopardize the trust that she is
>developing in me, but I don't want her to develop bad leading
>manners either.  Does anyone have any suggestions of ways to
>get her to walk next to me without making her head shy or
>afraid of me?

>Thanks!

>Allisa

Your timing on this topic is good.  'Horse and Rider' magazine has an
article this month(Sept) on this very topic.  Its called 'Respect' by
John Lyons.  
--
___________________________________________________________________


 
 
 

hlter training question

Post by Betsy Ha » Thu, 07 Sep 1995 04:00:00


Quote:
>I have a 3 month old mustang filly that I am halter breaking.
>My problem is that when leading her she gets ahead of me and so I
>end up having to circle her to get her back next to me.  She also
>bumps into me when she spooks.  She is still nervous about being
>handled, so I don't want to jeopardize the trust that she is
>developing in me, but I don't want her to develop bad leading
>manners either.  Does anyone have any suggestions of ways to
>get her to walk next to me without making her head shy or
>afraid of me?

You must make her understand that you are NOT to be bumped into,
no matter how spooked she is.  If you have to back her off harshly,
then stop and wait for her to get over it before proceeding, but
she must respect your space.  If she is always getting ahead of you,
then maybe she needs to run and blow off steam before the leading
sessions.  

At first it is okay to accommodate her energy by leading her in a
circle, while you are leading her to the turn-out area, for example,
but afterwards you should practice leading her and not letting her
go ahead of you.  Lead her with a good solid fence on the other side
of her so she can't easily swing her haunches away.  Every time she
starts to get ahead of you, say "No!" and back it up with however
much force you need.  

At first she may be a little afraid of you when you discipline her,
but take your time and let her get over it, then go on.  She won't trust
you if you don't take charge of the situation.  Teach her this now,
because it won't be any easier when she gets bigger.

--
BETSY HALE - Performing artist:  Actress, Singer, Dancer
        Horse trainer: Dressage & Jumping - adhering to classical principles
        of lightness, harmony and elegance.

 
 
 

hlter training question

Post by <mess.. » Thu, 07 Sep 1995 04:00:00

Quote:


>>I have a 3 month old mustang filly that I am halter breaking.
>>My problem is that when leading her she gets ahead of me and so I
>>end up having to circle her to get her back next to me.  She also
>>bumps into me when she spooks.  She is still nervous about being
>>handled, so I don't want to jeopardize the trust that she is
>>developing in me, but I don't want her to develop bad leading
>>manners either.  Does anyone have any suggestions of ways to
>>get her to walk next to me without making her head shy or
>>afraid of me?

 I know she's young, but this kind of behavior will only amplify when she gets bigger and stronger, so it'll be tougher (and more da=
ngerous) to correct it then.  Try looping a chain over her nose (a small one, since her muzzle is probably quite small).  When she j=
umps ahead of you, say "No!" sharply and give a tug on the chain.  Don't 'rip', just put pressure on the bridge of her nose.  It wil=
l give you a bit more leverage than a regular bull snap lead underneath her chin will.  If she walks quietly by your side, praise he=
r with a pat or calm words, but made sure there is a definite inflection and raise of your voice when you say 'NO!' Reinforce it wit=
h the chain as needed.  She will soon find (hopefully) that it is much more fun to walk with you and not ahead of you.  Good luck!

- Debbie

 
 
 

hlter training question

Post by Donna Patt » Thu, 07 Sep 1995 04:00:00


Quote:
>I have a 3 month old mustang filly that I am halter breaking.
>My problem is that when leading her she gets ahead of me and so I
>end up having to circle her to get her back next to me.  She also
>bumps into me when she spooks.  She is still nervous about being
>handled, so I don't want to jeopardize the trust that she is
>developing in me, but I don't want her to develop bad leading
>manners either.  Does anyone have any suggestions of ways to
>get her to walk next to me without making her head shy or
>afraid of me?

Assuming that the basic TTEAM work is still the same as it was when I took
the class, it would be really helpful with these problems. It should teach
you how to use the "whips and chains" and your body language to teach the
filly where her space is and where your space is.  I found this really
helpful when I got my 3-year-old since she had been treated like a large
puppy and had no idea that she shouldn't be in my space.

(BTW, for the humor-impaired "whips and chains" was the term that my TTEAM
trainers used for the wand and the halter - TTEAM trainers don't advocate
S&M with the horses.)

 
 
 

hlter training question

Post by Shaggy » Sun, 17 Sep 1995 04:00:00

Allisa: Find and view Tellington-Jones' tapes. As with John Lyons, the
rules are simple...1-YOU don't get hurt, 2-HORSE doesn't get hurt, 3-You

 
 
 

hlter training question

Post by kristih.. » Mon, 18 Sep 1995 04:00:00

Quote:

>Allisa: Find and view Tellington-Jones' tapes. As with John Lyons, the
>rules are simple...1-YOU don't get hurt, 2-HORSE doesn't get hurt, 3-You


Doesn't sound much like Pat Parelli's method, does it?