Small show judges - dangerous commands

Small show judges - dangerous commands

Post by Jennifer Mitchel » Tue, 17 Jun 1997 04:00:00


Went to a small local show this Sunday, and saw a judge endangering the
lives of three youth riders. In a youth command class this Western Horse
Assoc. of Ontario judge was eliminating riders by having them sit behind
the cantle of the saddle and control their horses. Didn't ask for a reverse
at the lope or a countercanter to eliminate, goes straight to dangerous and
showy stunts. He justified himself by asking the ages of the horses - like
that made a difference. He did get bawled out by my trainer - her daughter
and one of her students were in the class. The kids also were told in no
uncertain terms that they were not to perform dangerous commands -
nevermind who asked them.

 
 
 

Small show judges - dangerous commands

Post by Sylvana Smit » Tue, 17 Jun 1997 04:00:00

Went to a small local show this Sunday, and saw a judge endangering the
lives of three youth riders. In a youth command class this Western Horse
Assoc. of Ontario judge was eliminating riders by having them sit behind
the cantle of the saddle and control their horses. Didn't ask for a
reverse at the lope or a countercanter to eliminate, goes straight to
dangerous and showy stunts. He justified himself by asking the ages of
the horses - like that made a difference. He did get bawled out by my
trainer - her daughter and one of her students were in the class. The
kids also were told in no uncertain terms that they were not to perform
dangerous commands - nevermind who asked them.

---------------

Sounds appalling, if you ask me.  And not a useful indicator of
horsemanship either.

In a similar vein, a couple of years ago I spectated at an
English-Western open show that included a Double Bareback Pleasure class
in the roster.  Yep.  Two people on the horse, riding bareback.

I thought, okay, maybe this can just be a cute fun class.  Don't be so
nervous about it--in spite of the fact that when I was nine, Donny
Anderson and I rode his albino pony double-bareback and fell off in the
barnyard and smacked our heads together hard, ouch!

The class drew about 8 or 10 outfits/teams, whatever you call it.  Well,
that judge called for the group to "Go LOPE or CANTER."  Yes!  The kids
were dropping like flies, and one rider sprained or broke a wrist.

Madness.

--Remembering When I Was Young and Did That Stuff Too--Sylvana

 
 
 

Small show judges - dangerous commands

Post by R. Pappa » Sun, 22 Jun 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

> Sounds appalling, if you ask me.  And not a useful indicator of
> horsemanship either.

> In a similar vein, a couple of years ago I spectated at an
> English-Western open show that included a Double Bareback Pleasure class
> in the roster.  Yep.  Two people on the horse, riding bareback.

> I thought, okay, maybe this can just be a cute fun class.  Don't be so
> nervous about it--in spite of the fact that when I was nine, Donny
> Anderson and I rode his albino pony double-bareback and fell off in the
> barnyard and smacked our heads together hard, ouch!

> The class drew about 8 or 10 outfits/teams, whatever you call it.  Well,
> that judge called for the group to "Go LOPE or CANTER."  Yes!  The kids
> were dropping like flies, and one rider sprained or broke a wrist.

> Madness.

> --Remembering When I Was Young and Did That Stuff Too--Sylvana

Years ago my sister and I were riding double bareback and were loping
along at a nice gentle pace on a horse who had the best lope ever and my
sister(not a horse person) started to lose her balance and instead of
telling me to stop when she started to fall she put her hand around my
waist(sp) and took me off along with her. We fell on a really soft spot
and both had a good laugh at ourselves. But we sure got embarassed when
we saw we had an audience we had fallen where we were very visiable to
the 1st tee of an exclusive golf course and I guessed we drew a bit of
attention as we loped by with our hair blowing in the breeze and then
proceded to fall off. Then to add insualt to injury I got back up 1st
and gave my sister(a lithe 80lb er) a hand back up and she proceded to
pull me back off the horse again and by this time the guys at the 1st
tee were really cracking up.

Rachael- those crazy things you do while young.

 
 
 

Small show judges - dangerous commands

Post by Elizabeth Moo » Sun, 22 Jun 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

> Years ago my sister and I were riding double bareback and were loping
> along at a nice gentle pace on a horse who had the best lope ever and my
> sister(not a horse person) started to lose her balance and instead of
> telling me to stop when she started to fall she put her hand around my
> waist(sp) and took me off along with her. We fell on a really soft spot
> and both had a good laugh at ourselves. But we sure got embarassed when
> we saw we had an audience we had fallen where we were very visiable to
> the 1st tee of an exclusive golf course and I guessed we drew a bit of
> attention as we loped by with our hair blowing in the breeze and then
> proceded to fall off. Then to add insualt to injury I got back up 1st
> and gave my sister(a lithe 80lb er) a hand back up and she proceded to
> pull me back off the horse again and by this time the guys at the 1st
> tee were really cracking up.

> Rachael- those crazy things you do while young.

Some friends had a very gentle, *very* patient paint mare (not
capitalized because I don't know if she was registered or not).  You
could climb up on her by a variety of routes; her best trick with small
riders was to let them straddle her neck, while she had her head down,
and then she'd lift them up and slide them back onto her back.  She
regularly carried double bareback, and occasionally more (little kids, of
course)...I remember being the back end of a 4-person sandwich on her,
while riding down the street one day, and having a heck of a time not
sliding off over her rump.  The littlest kids were in the middle; her
owner was up front, and I was supposed to keep myself (and the little
kids) from falling off.  Bomb-proof just about defined this mare--I never
saw or heard of her spooking at *anything*.  I used to lie on her back
while she was grazing and just about go to sleep up there.  When they
bathed her for a show, often one of the little kids (maybe 5 years
old) would be sitting up on her back, scrubbing away, while another
washed her lower legs, and her owner worked on her tail.  When Martha
took her in shows, other horses might throw up their heads, or hop
around, when flashes went off, or loose dogs came into the ring--but this
mare just chugged along.  Parades, ditto.  Other horses could freak
right beside her, and she'd give them a mild, puzzled "What's up with
you, dummy?" look and walk on.  This kind of horse can really spoil you
and make you forget all the safety rules...luckily, she wasn't my horse,
and I had to cope with other peoples' much less broke critters.  (I
didn't recognize my luck at the time, of course.  One never does.)

Elizabeth Moon