Verbal commands: how many do THIS?

Verbal commands: how many do THIS?

Post by Lynn Wilhel » Fri, 17 Apr 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

> In keeping with the "how many do this" theme:
> How many of you train with/for or consistently use verbal commands?
> Although I realize in some circles it is not considered good form, I
> consistently use "walk," "back," and "whoa" or "'hoa" with the 7-yr
> old Paso Fino mare I ride. I consider whoa the most important on the
> ground or mounted -- I figure that somewhere, sometime I'm going to
> end up minus a rein or with a leg off on its own tangent, and I want
> to still be able to halt regardless. Artista definitely knows what
> whoa means (stopnowyouevildemonImeannow) and it also saves wear and
> tear on her nose (I ride in a jacquima.)
>      So how about the rest of you?

> --
> Rebecca

How about trying to use your seat to control your horse?  The easiest
part of this is stop your hips as they follow the movement of the
horse.  Your hips follow (mimic) the movement of the horse's hips and
stilling yours will still his.  Some horses are more sensitive than
others but most may become more sensitive.  This type of work could
supplement the verbal commands.

I talk to horses I ride all of the time.  I don't suppose I use verbal
commands as much as I use encouragement, praise and growls.  In dressage
tests the rider is faulted for speaking but on cross-country you'll hear
me, "Baaalaance, big oxer next,"  "Two more to the finish," "Gooood
pony!!!" as well as the occasional expletive.

The more I think about it my verbal ramblings (like my written ones) are
as much for my benefit as the horse's.

Lynn--Who sings while riding too, the scarecrow's song "If I only had a
Brain"!

 
 
 

Verbal commands: how many do THIS?

Post by Bill Walk » Fri, 17 Apr 1998 04:00:00

Quote:

> In keeping with the "how many do this" theme:
> How many of you train with/for or consistently use verbal commands?
> Although I realize in some circles it is not considered good form, I
> consistently use "walk," "back," and "whoa" or "'hoa" with the 7-yr
> old Paso Fino mare I ride. I consider whoa the most important on the
> ground or mounted -- I figure that somewhere, sometime I'm going to
> end up minus a rein or with a leg off on its own tangent, and I want
> to still be able to halt regardless. Artista definitely knows what
> whoa means (stopnowyouevildemonImeannow) and it also saves wear and
> tear on her nose (I ride in a jacquima.)
>      So how about the rest of you?

When working my horse in the round pen, I've found that he responds
perfectly to "walk", "trot", "canter", and "ho", with no other cues
required.  "Ho" is the only one I use regularly when riding (though I use
it along with nonverbal cues), but I occasionally use "walk" or "trot" to
reinforce what I'm asking for nonverbally, primarily on downward
transitions.  But hey, I'm still enough of a newbie to not know any
better. :-)

----------------------------------------------
Bill Walker, QUALCOMM, Inc., San Diego, CA USA

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Verbal commands: how many do THIS?

Post by ra » Sat, 18 Apr 1998 04:00:00

In keeping with the "how many do this" theme:
How many of you train with/for or consistently use verbal commands?
Although I realize in some circles it is not considered good form, I
consistently use "walk," "back," and "whoa" or "'hoa" with the 7-yr
old Paso Fino mare I ride. I consider whoa the most important on the
ground or mounted -- I figure that somewhere, sometime I'm going to
end up minus a rein or with a leg off on its own tangent, and I want
to still be able to halt regardless. Artista definitely knows what
whoa means (stopnowyouevildemonImeannow) and it also saves wear and
tear on her nose (I ride in a jacquima.)
     So how about the rest of you?

--
Rebecca


 
 
 

Verbal commands: how many do THIS?

Post by Lori » Sat, 18 Apr 1998 04:00:00

Quote:

> In keeping with the "how many do this" theme:
> How many of you train with/for or consistently use verbal commands?

I do, I do!  I used to have a TB who seemed to understand short phrases
like "go to the rail" or (for better canter pace between fences)
"kibbles & bits, kibbles & bits".  Of course, all my horses have the
most basic understanding of English: walk, trot, canter, ho, halt, stop
already!<g>, stay.  I was kind of surprised that after spending 6 mos in
the backyard of a dog obedience trainer Killer hasn't learned "down" and
"sit" (but his "recall" is pretty good).   :-)
--
Lorie
***********************************************
Quote:
>>>coming soon: Crossrail-by-Mail

     --- mail order liquidation of the Crossrail English Saddlery's
     remaining inventory
 
 
 

Verbal commands: how many do THIS?

Post by Dokke » Sat, 18 Apr 1998 04:00:00

Quote:

>> In keeping with the "how many do this" theme:
>> How many of you train with/for or consistently use verbal commands?>>

Guilty as charged!  Doc aced English 101 awhile ago, he's been into more
advanced grammar since then ;o)  The basics of walk, trot, canter of course.
To him "easy" means slow down / chill out / stop approaching that fence at 90
mph / the plastic bag on the ground can't hurt you.  "Ho" means stop and I mean
stop!!!  (I have a pet peeve about people that use "ho" to mean both "slow
down" and "stop".)  "Stand up" means that he's already standing, but his legs
better remain in constant contact with the ground (great for wrapping legs,
working with vet or farrier, etc.).  "COME HERE!  I'M NOT WALKING ACROSS THAT
MUD!" is pretty self-explanatory.  The ever-useful "The only thing you have to
fear around here is ME" that I've mentioned on the ng before.  Of course he
knows all the basic treats (sugar, apple, carrot, mint, shoo fly pie... OK,
he's spoiled)... he also understands the difference between "here's your treat"
(he has a heart attack until he gets it) and telling him he has to "wait for
it" (he will wait expectantly and quietly, watching your every move but polite
as can be).  And in case he gets carried away looking for those treats there's
"Kisses ONLY" which  will prevent bodily harm and result in a lot of hand
***ing.  Another good protection is "BACK OFF LUG!".   Or there's "Give me
your foot.  No the OTHER ONE!" will result in a quick changing of whatever hoof
he's been holding up.  Let's see... what else.  "Don't even THINK about it" is
a good one (particularly useful when I'm wrapping hind legs & he feels a call
of nature).  "You're going over that (or onto that, in the case of a trailer)
if I have to carry you!" will usually get him moving in the right direction.
Hmm, multiple obscenities are also something he understands (remember the Horse
Screamer thread?  He does know DAMMIT means business).  I'm sorry to say the
first few years I worked with him he responded to "SONUVA***" better than
"Doc".  Oh yes... and "I SAW THAT!"  (substitute 'heard that' if he's cribbing
when I turn my back).  "I'm not leaving until I've brushed your face" will
result in a lowering of his head (he hates having his face brushed).  "I'm not
clipping your ears today, IDIOT!" will keep him from throwing a fit when I turn
on the clippers.  Oh... and either "Are you tired?" or "Poor baby, did I work
you too hard?" or "Are you going to yawn?"  will get a series of fake yawns in
response.  And of course "Do I get a kiss?" gets his nose in my face.  (Aw.)
And "Good boy", "Great boy" or "WHAT a GOOD BOY you ARE!" results in him
getting downright***y when we're out for a ride (yeah, I know I am).  The
opposite is a kind of game show buzzer- like "EH!" or "Heeeey"  when he starts
getting grumpy about something, which always results in an "oops, what did I
miss?" reaction.  When he's calling for me from a great distance (which can be
anywhere from 5-500 feet away) and he's getting too noisy, telling him
"Quiet!... no, quieter than that... quiiiieeeetly" will cause a gradual
decrease of volume until he's nickering so softly you can only see his nostrils
and muzzle quivering... hehe, works every time.  And other people can rev him
up for my appearance with "She's coming!  What's she bringing you?", which will
result in a piercing Doc scream complete with bug-eyes (his not mine)  when I
come into view.

Quote:
>> Artista definitely knows what
>> whoa means (stopnowyouevildemonImeannow) and it also saves wear and
>> tear on her nose (I ride in a jacquima.)
>>      So how about the rest of you?
>> >> --
>> Rebecca

I give up.  What's a jacquima?  We just speak "snaffle-ese" over here.

Talkin' to ourselves,
Kelly & Doc

 
 
 

Verbal commands: how many do THIS?

Post by css » Sat, 18 Apr 1998 04:00:00

Quote:


> > In keeping with the "how many do this" theme:
> > How many of you train with/for or consistently use verbal commands?

> How about trying to use your seat to control your horse?

Little bit tricky when you are not astride the horse Lynn <g>.  I use
voice commands along with body language as part of my training on the
ground.  The work is specialised work in hand and on the longe from
breaking to the Haute Ecole.  The horses understand all of the usual,
walk, trot canter, halt, back, turn, over as well as sounds which are
sort of words ( would  not find them in the dictionary though!) which
create more impulsion for collected work such as piaffe and passage, and
extensions.

They are words, but are fashioned more for the horses than for humans,
and can sound sort of funny to an onlooker<g>.  There is nothing wrong
with training with the voice in my opinion, especially if you wish to
have the horse work at liberty.  There is definitly no detriment that I
have found, and if you follow the rule of miniaturising all of your aids
and asks, the voice can turn to a mere whisper coupled with body
language then just the body language without the voice.

Regards
Karen-Maree'

 
 
 

Verbal commands: how many do THIS?

Post by Jazzm » Sat, 18 Apr 1998 04:00:00

Whew, I am a talker!  I talk to my animals all the time, and sometimes it gets
rather funny.  I even talk to the cats.....one day I was having a conversation
with my big silver tabby telling him how gorgeous he is and how he shouldn't be
killing so many of the birds.  My husband was almost in stitches while he was
leaning against the outside of the tack room door listening to me, when he came
around the corner I almost died.   Then hubby wanted to know if I loved him as
much as the cat......fast hugs and kisses for big boy now.  Both *big toms*
left the barn purring, everyone one needs some TLC some days.

Back to horses, yep, I talk all the time while training.  My animals understand
even grunts to indicate improper behavior by them.  I use the word "halt" to
whoa and one day a friend of mine was having trouble whoaing my horse she was
riding.  Jerri kept on saying whoa and I laughed from the side lines and then
uttered__"HALT"__.  The horse stood rock still, with her eyes rolled around
toward me, the horse seemed to be questioned who was doing the riding right
now, but she knew I said halt that's for sure.

They know small phases like, "com'here",  "stand still", "quit that", all the
standard stuff.  I'd really be surprised if most horses don't understand a lot
more than you give them credit for.

Jaz
(There are no perfect horses or people, cards are dealt, play 'em now.) <wink>

 
 
 

Verbal commands: how many do THIS?

Post by Karen Sturtevan » Sat, 18 Apr 1998 04:00:00

I use verbal commands also, combined with aids.  Sometimes my horse will
respond to just the verbal command, sometimes not, depends on his mood
(i.e. if he's having a slug-day, he responds to "whoa" immediately with
no rein pressure; however, if he's having a peppy day, rein pressure is
required for "whoa").

Karen
Seabrook, NH

 
 
 

Verbal commands: how many do THIS?

Post by RC » Sat, 18 Apr 1998 04:00:00

Saddlebred folks talk a lot to their horses, and I probably do it more
then most!  I say walk, trot, canter, whoa.  I kiss to them to let them
know it's time to slow gait and generally carry on other conversations
with them as well.  They know that when I say "it's OK" that means yes,
I see the cat on the bale of hay and no, it's not a mountain lion.  Or
yes, I see the bag blowing on the ground and no it will not envelope and
kill you.  In the show ring when there is a lot going on, they find my
voice reassuring and comforting.  I start the walk and whoa commands
when they're babies--they don't forget.

Quote:

> In keeping with the "how many do this" theme:
> How many of you train with/for or consistently use verbal commands?
> Although I realize in some circles it is not considered good form, I
> consistently use "walk," "back," and "whoa" or "'hoa" with the 7-yr
> old Paso Fino mare I ride. I consider whoa the most important on the
> ground or mounted -- I figure that somewhere, sometime I'm going to
> end up minus a rein or with a leg off on its own tangent, and I want
> to still be able to halt regardless. Artista definitely knows what
> whoa means (stopnowyouevildemonImeannow) and it also saves wear and
> tear on her nose (I ride in a jacquima.)
>      So how about the rest of you?

> --
> Rebecca


 
 
 

Verbal commands: how many do THIS?

Post by RC » Sat, 18 Apr 1998 04:00:00

I am also more then occasionally guilty of telling the cat the whoa and of lungeing
the dog!

Quote:

> Whew, I am a talker!  I talk to my animals all the time, and sometimes it gets
> rather funny.  I even talk to the cats.....one day I was having a conversation
> with my big silver tabby telling him how gorgeous he is and how he shouldn't be
> killing so many of the birds.  My husband was almost in stitches while he was
> leaning against the outside of the tack room door listening to me, when he came
> around the corner I almost died.   Then hubby wanted to know if I loved him as
> much as the cat......fast hugs and kisses for big boy now.  Both *big toms*
> left the barn purring, everyone one needs some TLC some days.

> Back to horses, yep, I talk all the time while training.  My animals understand
> even grunts to indicate improper behavior by them.  I use the word "halt" to
> whoa and one day a friend of mine was having trouble whoaing my horse she was
> riding.  Jerri kept on saying whoa and I laughed from the side lines and then
> uttered__"HALT"__.  The horse stood rock still, with her eyes rolled around
> toward me, the horse seemed to be questioned who was doing the riding right
> now, but she knew I said halt that's for sure.

> They know small phases like, "com'here",  "stand still", "quit that", all the
> standard stuff.  I'd really be surprised if most horses don't understand a lot
> more than you give them credit for.

> Jaz
> (There are no perfect horses or people, cards are dealt, play 'em now.) <wink>

 
 
 

Verbal commands: how many do THIS?

Post by kkrue.. » Sat, 18 Apr 1998 04:00:00

I always use verbal commands.  If I was showing in a class, I wouldn't move my
lips and would speak very softly. (Of course along with usual cueing)  
Mary

 
 
 

Verbal commands: how many do THIS?

Post by LauraSCA » Sat, 18 Apr 1998 04:00:00

I think verbal commands are very valuable - my horses know lots of commands,
but whoa is very important. One day I was loading my warm*** into a trailer,
and he had a helmet on. He suddenly threw up his head and backed out, catching
the helmet on the roof of the trailer, which pulled his whole halter off! Now I
have a loose horse at a horse show - good thing he knows "whoa!"   I have had a
similar experience with broken bridle on a trail ride, where both "whoa" and
"Come here" came in handy!

One note though - some riding disciplines discourage voice commands in the show
ring, so be careful. Besides, it can backfire -  in the show ring if my horse
hears the judge say canter, she goes! Sometimes that's an advantage and
sometime it isn't!

 
 
 

Verbal commands: how many do THIS?

Post by Betsy Walke » Sat, 18 Apr 1998 04:00:00

Quote:

> I am also more then occasionally guilty of telling the cat the whoa and of lungeing
> the dog!

[snip]

While riding on the back of my boyfriend's motorcycle the other day, I found myself
unconsciously using leg cues when I saw a pothole coming up straight ahead.

Didn't work.

~-Betsy~-

 
 
 

Verbal commands: how many do THIS?

Post by Lynn Wilhel » Sat, 18 Apr 1998 04:00:00

Quote:



> > > In keeping with the "how many do this" theme:
> > > How many of you train with/for or consistently use verbal commands?


> > How about trying to use your seat to control your horse?

> Little bit tricky when you are not astride the horse Lynn <g>.  I use
> voice commands along with body language as part of my training on the
> ground.  The work is specialised work in hand and on the longe from
> breaking to the Haute Ecole.  The horses understand all of the usual,
> walk, trot canter, halt, back, turn, over as well as sounds which are
> sort of words ( would  not find them in the dictionary though!) which
> create more impulsion for collected work such as piaffe and passage, and
> extensions.

> They are words, but are fashioned more for the horses than for humans,
> and can sound sort of funny to an onlooker<g>.  There is nothing wrong
> with training with the voice in my opinion, especially if you wish to
> have the horse work at liberty.  There is definitly no detriment that I
> have found, and if you follow the rule of miniaturising all of your aids
> and asks, the voice can turn to a mere whisper coupled with body
> language then just the body language without the voice.

> Regards
> Karen-Maree'

No argument here!!

Lynn

 
 
 

Verbal commands: how many do THIS?

Post by Alwzhor » Mon, 20 Apr 1998 04:00:00

We're death on voice cues for this reason. Horses shown on the rail are
notorious for anticipating the cues from announcer.

I am a firm believer in WHOA and that's it for verbal cues.

Jennifer

Quote:
>One note though - some riding disciplines discourage voice commands in the
>show
>ring, so be careful. Besides, it can backfire -  in the show ring if my horse
>hears the judge say canter, she goes! Sometimes that's an advantage and
>sometime it isn't!
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