Oh God -- a lurker jumps in

Oh God -- a lurker jumps in

Post by Betty Woo » Sat, 11 Jan 1997 04:00:00


Hi,

I've been lurking around for a few months, picking up great advice to
other people's questions and adapting them to my own situation.  Thanks
for all the great tips :-)  I never thought I'd be posting, being a
naturally shy sort, but this latest idea that people are afraid to post
here because they might be harshly treated prompted me to jump in.

I wouldn't be afraid to post a question here, but I'd make sure to to
think very carefully...can I figure it out myself, at least partially?
Have I looked at my own responsibility in either causing or allowing the
problem behavior?  If I ask myself these questions and find out that it
was due to my own stupidity/carelessness, I wouldn't post, but I would
still have learned something...and if it was due to ignorance, then I
better ask people with more experience than I have how to prevent such
things in the future.

Sure, there are some modes of expression I don't care for, but isn't that
my problem?  There is too much excellent knowledge here to be put off by
such things...and if I am put off, I can always not read certain
posters/threads

My background:  I've been riding for about 20 years (yikes! that long?).
I was fortunate enough to work for an excellent trainer in my ***s/early
twenties, and I credit him with teaching me everything I know -- not only
riding basics, but problem-solving techniques.  Although I was able to
ride a lot of "push-button" horses that taught me things like what a good
canter departure is, I found that the horses that taught me the most and
provided the most enjoyment were those that made me work to figure out how
to get them to do what I was asking/telling.  That is, for me, the
so-called"brats" were the best teachers, and many of my most joyful
moments were at the end of grueling lessons when the horse and I finally
"got it together" (or maybe "got it", together).

I currently have 2 horses on three acres in Georgetown, MA.  My almost 30
y-o QH, Encino Donna Bar (Donna) was my first horse and has been a great
friend for more than 15 years.  She is extremely sweet, the horse I used
to ride to relax and just "be".  She has slowed down a lot -- arthritis
and COPD -- but is still happy and basically healthy.  Hazel River
Ambition (Rudy) is a 9 yo Morgan and definitely would be called a "brat"
by some.  He's very talented and intelligent (my opinion only -- no proof
here).  We're not doing much now because my backyard facility does not
include arena lights, but once the days get longer we'll be back doing
dressage.

I also have 2 dogs, 2 cats, and a good-humored, long suffering husband...

Just thought I'd say hi...back to lurking for the time being...

Betty Woolf
Georgetown, MA

My opinions are my own and no-one else's

 
 
 

Oh God -- a lurker jumps in

Post by C.M.Newe » Sat, 11 Jan 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

>Hi,

>I've been lurking around for a few months, picking up great advice to
>other people's questions and adapting them to my own situation.  Thanks
>for all the great tips :-)  I never thought I'd be posting, being a
>naturally shy sort, but this latest idea that people are afraid to post
>here because they might be harshly treated prompted me to jump in.

        What you're *not* afraid of us?  My goodness, we must be
slipping! (Either that, or you've been*** out with 'Rocious, the
Fearless Filly)....
                --CMNewell
************
"From a sea song foaming
with slashing brine;
from a sunbeam springs
a horse with  tangled mane." R.Hunter

 
 
 

Oh God -- a lurker jumps in

Post by Ride » Sat, 11 Jan 1997 04:00:00

Quote:
> I found that the horses that taught me the most and
> provided the most enjoyment were those that made me work to figure out how
> to get them to do what I was asking/telling.  That is, for me, the
> so-called"brats" were the best teachers, and many of my most joyful
> moments were at the end of grueling lessons when the horse and I finally
> "got it together" (or maybe "got it", together).

Hehehe. How true! The horses are our *real* teachers. My trainer even says so!

Glad to see you posting.

Bill

 
 
 

Oh God -- a lurker jumps in

Post by Richard Botteri » Sat, 11 Jan 1997 04:00:00


Quote:
>Hi,
>I've been lurking around for a few months, picking up great advice to
>other people's questions and adapting them to my own situation.  Thanks
>for all the great tips :-)  I never thought I'd be posting, being a
>naturally shy sort, but this latest idea that people are afraid to post
>here because they might be harshly treated prompted me to jump in.

Welcome to rec.equestrian!

Quote:
>I wouldn't be afraid to post a question here, but I'd make sure to to
>think very carefully...can I figure it out myself, at least partially?
>Have I looked at my own responsibility in either causing or allowing the
>problem behavior?  If I ask myself these questions and find out that it
>was due to my own stupidity/carelessness, I wouldn't post, but I would
>still have learned something...and if it was due to ignorance, then I
>better ask people with more experience than I have how to prevent such
>things in the future.

This is EXACTLY what many of us hope to see happening with regard to
rec.equestrian AND in the way people handle their horses.

Quote:
>Sure, there are some modes of expression I don't care for, but isn't that
>my problem?  There is too much excellent knowledge here to be put off by
>such things...and if I am put off, I can always not read certain
>posters/threads

Absolutely correct.

Quote:
>My background:  I've been riding for about 20 years (yikes! that long?).
>I was fortunate enough to work for an excellent trainer in my ***s/early
>twenties, and I credit him with teaching me everything I know -- not only
>riding basics, but problem-solving techniques.  

Riding basics AND problem-solving techniques are both of critical
importance in the riding and training of horses.

Quote:
>Although I was able to
>ride a lot of "push-button" horses that taught me things like what a good
>canter departure is, I found that the horses that taught me the most and
>provided the most enjoyment were those that made me work to figure out how
>to get them to do what I was asking/telling.  That is, for me, the
>so-called"brats" were the best teachers, and many of my most joyful
>moments were at the end of grueling lessons when the horse and I finally
>"got it together" (or maybe "got it", together).

This is very true.  When I purchased my first (and so far, my only) horse
from my first trainer, he commented that "You may be able to find a
=better= horse, but you won't find one that will teach you as much."
I took him from a green-broke 4 year old who knew walk, trot, canter,
halt, back-up, and basic turns to a horse that was winning in Western
Pleasure within a year and a half.  At the same time, we went on to
also be competitive in reining, western riding, trail, and then went
on to do road hack, show hack, hunter hack, and eventually to doing
hunter classes at the open shows, still taking our share of ribbons.
We didn't do a lot of dressage shows, but by the time he was about
10 years old I was able to do two-tempe flying changes on him. And
all of that, I had to learn as I went along because I only started
riding (at age 30) two years before I bought him. There was the
occasional tough patch, but when the breakthrough came it was
intensely rewarding.

Quote:
>I currently have 2 horses on three acres in Georgetown, MA.  My almost 30
>y-o QH, Encino Donna Bar (Donna) was my first horse and has been a great
>friend for more than 15 years.  She is extremely sweet, the horse I used
>to ride to relax and just "be".  She has slowed down a lot -- arthritis
>and COPD -- but is still happy and basically healthy.  Hazel River
>Ambition (Rudy) is a 9 yo Morgan and definitely would be called a "brat"
>by some.  He's very talented and intelligent (my opinion only -- no proof
>here).  We're not doing much now because my backyard facility does not
>include arena lights, but once the days get longer we'll be back doing
>dressage.

I still just have my (approaching 17 years old) QH, Sun Valley (registered
name Ima Deluxe Sonny), and he's been a wonderful friend for over 12
years now. He =loves= jumping more than any other type of riding, and
has an energy level that makes him seem more like 7 than nearly 17.
We board at a facility with an indoor arena, and get to about 7 or 8
shows a year.

Quote:
>I also have 2 dogs, 2 cats, and a good-humored, long suffering husband...
>Just thought I'd say hi...back to lurking for the time being...
>Betty Woolf
>Georgetown, MA
>My opinions are my own and no-one else's

Again, welcome to rec.eq.

p&m

Richard and Sun Valley

Richard Botterill

Distance Education and Media Division
Assiniboine Community College
Brandon, Manitoba, Canada

 
 
 

Oh God -- a lurker jumps in

Post by Kris Anderso » Sat, 11 Jan 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

>I never thought I'd be posting, being a
>naturally shy sort, but this latest idea that people are afraid to post
>here because they might be harshly treated prompted me to jump in.

>I wouldn't be afraid to post a question here, but I'd make sure to to
>think very carefully...[snip]

        Geez, maybe you should post more often....  :-)

        Kris, enjoying a vacation from riding as well, but feeling very
disoriented, Anderson

        Kris,  

Williamstown, MA

 
 
 

Oh God -- a lurker jumps in

Post by sdan.. » Sat, 11 Jan 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

>I've been lurking around for a few months, picking up great advice to
>other people's questions and adapting them to my own situation.  Thanks
>for all the great tips :-)  I never thought I'd be posting, being a
>naturally shy sort, but this latest idea that people are afraid to post
>here because they might be harshly treated prompted me to jump in.

I'm glad you delurked.  What a nice post. :-)

Quote:

>Sure, there are some modes of expression I don't care for, but isn't that
>my problem?  There is too much excellent knowledge here to be put off by
>such things...and if I am put off, I can always not read certain
>posters/threads

Amzing how well that works...huh?

 I found that the horses that taught me the most and

Quote:
>provided the most enjoyment were those that made me work to figure out how
>to get them to do what I was asking/telling.  That is, for me, the
>so-called"brats" were the best teachers, and many of my most joyful
>moments were at the end of grueling lessons when the horse and I finally
>"got it together" (or maybe "got it", together).

Yep, yep, yep.....Bless their hairy hides....they're the ones that
make you a rider, not just a rein-holder.

Quote:

>I also have 2 dogs, 2 cats, and a good-humored, long suffering husband...

No wonder you seem so well adjusted.  ;-)
Quote:

>Just thought I'd say hi...back to lurking for the time being...

You're background sounds much like mine.  I enjoyed reading your post,
it was a day brightener...feel free to delurk again.

Ssuan Dangar

 
 
 

Oh God -- a lurker jumps in

Post by Mary » Mon, 13 Jan 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

> Hi,

> I've been lurking around for a few months, picking up great advice to
> other people's questions and adapting them to my own situation.  Thanks
> for all the great tips :-)  I never thought I'd be posting, being a
> naturally shy sort, but this latest idea that people are afraid to post
> here because they might be harshly treated prompted me to jump in.

> I wouldn't be afraid to post a question here, but I'd make sure to to
> think very carefully...can I figure it out myself, at least partially?
> Have I looked at my own responsibility in either causing or allowing the
> problem behavior?  If I ask myself these questions and find out that it
> was due to my own stupidity/carelessness, I wouldn't post, but I would
> still have learned something...and if it was due to ignorance, then I
> better ask people with more experience than I have how to prevent such
> things in the future.

> Sure, there are some modes of expression I don't care for, but isn't that
> my problem?  There is too much excellent knowledge here to be put off by
> such things...and if I am put off, I can always not read certain
> posters/threads

> My background:  I've been riding for about 20 years (yikes! that long?).
> I was fortunate enough to work for an excellent trainer in my ***s/early
> twenties, and I credit him with teaching me everything I know -- not only
> riding basics, but problem-solving techniques.  Although I was able to
> ride a lot of "push-button" horses that taught me things like what a good
> canter departure is, I found that the horses that taught me the most and
> provided the most enjoyment were those that made me work to figure out how
> to get them to do what I was asking/telling.  That is, for me, the
> so-called"brats" were the best teachers, and many of my most joyful
> moments were at the end of grueling lessons when the horse and I finally
> "got it together" (or maybe "got it", together).

> I currently have 2 horses on three acres in Georgetown, MA.  My almost 30
> y-o QH, Encino Donna Bar (Donna) was my first horse and has been a great
> friend for more than 15 years.  She is extremely sweet, the horse I used
> to ride to relax and just "be".  She has slowed down a lot -- arthritis
> and COPD -- but is still happy and basically healthy.  Hazel River
> Ambition (Rudy) is a 9 yo Morgan and definitely would be called a "brat"
> by some.  He's very talented and intelligent (my opinion only -- no proof
> here).  We're not doing much now because my backyard facility does not
> include arena lights, but once the days get longer we'll be back doing
> dressage.

> I also have 2 dogs, 2 cats, and a good-humored, long suffering husband...

> Just thought I'd say hi...back to lurking for the time being...

> Betty Woolf
> Georgetown, MA

> My opinions are my own and no-one else's

Hi, and don't lurk too long I love to read posts from big-hearted animal
ruled posters.  :)

 also from the east coast and sick of winter already I am suffering from
indooritis as well.

Mary, NJ