Putting and End to Nipping/Biting

Putting and End to Nipping/Biting

Post by Liza Lyo » Sat, 05 Sep 1992 07:08:04


Hi, Everyone:

A few weeks ago, Kinsale was kicked while out playing with a buddy.  The net  
result was two weeks of rest and an increasingly nervous, fat thoroughbred (he  
even reverted to stud-like behavior; everyone is going deaf from his loving  
conversations with the sexier mares in the barn :-)).

Before this convalescence period, Kinsale had nearly perfect ground manners.  
He's sweet, gentle and careful around people (even tho a firecracker under  
saddle !).  It seems that his wandering mind has provoked him to start nipping,  
however, while standing in cross ties.  He doesn't reach behind to catch me  
while I'm grooming or tacking - it only seems to happen when I'm standing in  
front of him trying to brush his face (he nips to the side towards my hands).  
BTW - he *likes* having his face brushed - will even drop his head down for  
better access.

I immediately stopped the treats in case they were provoking the mouthy  
behavior, although he's never received them on a regular basis.  At this point,  
I don't know what else to try.  I want to put a stop to this ASAP before it  
becomes a permanent habit but don't want to provoke head-shy problems by  
hitting him with my hand.

I know there's been discussion on this in the past, but I can't remember any of  
the good ideas.  HELP before my Dr. Jekyl turns into Mr. Hyde !!

Liza and Kinsale (the mouth)

 
 
 

Putting and End to Nipping/Biting

Post by Carol Bra » Fri, 11 Sep 1992 03:25:42

Quote:

>Hi, Everyone:

>however, while standing in cross ties.  He doesn't reach behind to catch me  
>while I'm grooming or tacking - it only seems to happen when I'm standing in  
>front of him trying to brush his face (he nips to the side towards my hands).  
>BTW - he *likes* having his face brushed - will even drop his head down for  
>better access.

HUMMM....

I've never done this, but I heard it works well on colts who are nippy.
Take a large sewing needle and push it into a cork so that the pointy end
sticks out about 1/4 of an inch.

Hold the cork between your fingers.  When he moves to nip, give him a
little ***.  It seems that this does not promote headshyness because
the horse does not associate the *** with your hand (probably because
there is no big motion).  What do other netters think about this method?

Personally, when a horse bites me, I lay into them like there is no
tomorrow (I mean hard!).  This seems to get the message across fast
enough and I usually don't have to do it more than once.  I don't think
that you should worry about head-shyness.  Biting is a bigger problem,
especially if the next person your horse bites isn't you.

Good luck,

-Carol

 
 
 

Putting and End to Nipping/Biting

Post by Patty Howe » Fri, 11 Sep 1992 04:21:48

Quote:


>>Hi, Everyone:

>>however, while standing in cross ties.  He doesn't reach behind to catch me  
>>while I'm grooming or tacking - it only seems to happen when I'm standing in  
>>front of him trying to brush his face (he nips to the side towards my hands).  
>>BTW - he *likes* having his face brushed - will even drop his head down for  
>>better access.

>HUMMM....

>I've never done this, but I heard it works well on colts who are nippy.
>Take a large sewing needle and push it into a cork so that the pointy end
>sticks out about 1/4 of an inch.
>[...]
>Personally, when a horse bites me, I lay into them like there is no
>tomorrow (I mean hard!).  This seems to get the message across fast
>enough and I usually don't have to do it more than once.  I don't think
>that you should worry about head-shyness.  Biting is a bigger problem,
>especially if the next person your horse bites isn't you.

>Good luck,

>-Carol

 Personally, I think this method bites the big one. Sounds a lot like
 the spiked nosebands and 3 inch spurs of old.

 My suggestion is to take a short riding crop with you the next time
 you groom him (carried discretely at your side) and lay into his
 *shoulder* the next time he nips. Then offer him another opportunity
 to***up. Usually, they'll try one more time just to make sure.
 BTW I sold my TB mare to someone who was later absolutely amazed at
 how she lowered her head for grooming, clipping, bridling, etc. (actually,
 my instructor was at the sale and I never met the new owner, since
 I was away at college). We never told her that I was 4'9" and a 15.3 hand
 TB kindof got used to that :) Needless to say, my horses were never
 head shy.