Good News/Bad News (long)

Good News/Bad News (long)

Post by Kitty Omi » Fri, 10 Dec 1993 06:32:47


What a weird couple of days: First I had my mares palpated before
their lst rhino shot and they are PG!!!  These are mares who  others
have rented their bodies to make beautiful babies.  Both had slipped
their foals earlier in the season.  So am pleased everyone is doing their
part in the miracle of birth.  

That is the good news  - now for the bad....Last night while bringing
in horses for supper we were doing the lastest version of "OH I forget
where I am suppose to be."  The grey horses are  in the back barn
and the chestnuts are in another. (Hey dont ask me why it just turns out
that way).  Anyway the dumb chestnuts knocked over a bag of chicken corn
and broke it open all over the barn floor.  I put everyone in their stalls
except a yearling filly and went to close up the grey horses who did know
where they live..Keeping in mind that it is 8pm, pitch black outside& cold.
 As I am coming around the corner outside I here my husband Tony saying
oh sh*t several times.  I fiqure he is fussing about the spilled corn.
NO he is staring at the yearling filly eating the spilled corn while
her right leg is a piece of raw meat from the middle of the cannon bone
to the fetlock.  UUGGHHH!!!!! SHe has skin torn in a /\ with tendons
exposed and cut.... She had trotted from the paddock to the barn with the
pack and showed no sign of injury.  The fastest the vet could get there
was a hour and half.  Because she wasnt pumping *** out like a squirt gun
it was decided to just put her in the stall, give her supper and let the
wound bleed to let it clean itself.  When the vet got there, he
whistled,doped her up, cleaned the wound, stitched and wrapped the leg. I
was really surprized it all went back together. (I held additional lighting
and Tony held the horse up-he had to keep tapping her in the forehead to
remind her to stand up.)
I really appreciate my vets' skill with a needle. The filly is getting anti
botics and bute. I dont have to give shots. The first wrap stays for a week
and she is in the stall for at least a month.  She is going to get really
cranky and her mother who is her next door neighbor will get fatter cause
she will stay in to keep her company.  Hopefully we can get in some hand
walking after awhile. The vet expects the the tendons to heal  saying
that if you have to have cut tendons better the ones in the front than the
back.  What night. Then today was Sue Wilsons funeral... I am going to go
home & hid in my bed.  Now all I have to do is fiqure out how to get all
that *** off of the barn floor..

Thanks for listening ....
Kitty
--

 
 
 

Good News/Bad News (long)

Post by Mary Heal » Sun, 12 Dec 1993 00:02:31



Quote:

>I have heard that horses prefer to be amongst critters of similar
>color, i.e. will run off "odd-colored" horses.  Any stories?  (I can't
>provide a data point, as my Fjords are all the same color, and my
>pinto donkey is so "different" that I can see why the Fjords wouldn't
>want to associate with her.  ;-) )

Well, we turn out Regis and Big Beau (bays) together and used to
turn out Silver and Little Beau (greys) together.  If we turned all
4 out together they'd divide by color, but we turned them out this
way because Regis and Beau know each other well (and play a little
rough) and Silver was a steadying influence on Little Beau (who has
had ligament problems and doesn't need to be tearing wildly around
the pasture).
--
Mary and the Ames National Zoo:
     Raise a Fund ("Regis", 8yo TB)
     ANZ Sam-I-Am (4yo ACDx) & ANZ Noah Doll (11 mo ACD)
     Emma, Gareth, Rhiannon & Sibyl (cats from h*ll)
     more finches and fish every day!

 
 
 

Good News/Bad News (long)

Post by n.. » Tue, 14 Dec 1993 05:57:52

Something about this thread urged me to sift through a great pile Equus
issues because I remembered there was an article about color
preferences.  Hooray!  Way back in issue #81, July 1984, there are seven
pages devoted to the subject under an article titled "Visible
Differences: When Coat Color Counts."  Equus reported that they had
correspondence from readers who reported "color consciousness in
horses."  I quote from some of it:  "Coat colors. . .offer socially
significant visual information, and if there's anything that matters to
horses, it's equine society."    "To the equine brain, the unfamiliar is
initally always foe, and for horses raised amidst the earthier hues, the
first sight of light or white horseflesh is as disturbing as a Halloween
specter."  "Sex selection and kinship preferences may, in fact, lie at
the very heart of horses'color awareness."  The article concludes by
noting the great collection of anecdotal evidence but lack of tested,
scientific research: "Whether the individual's memory of coat colors
fond and fearful or the species' biological 'memory' of what's 'good' or
'bad' underlies a horse's reactions, a lot of them out there don't turn
a blind eye to other horses' hides."  There's a lot of good stuff in
this piece and I urge any of you who are interested to read the whole
thing.

Nancy McLaughlin


 
 
 

Good News/Bad News (long)

Post by Marsha Jo Hann » Sat, 11 Dec 1993 01:06:59

   ....Last night while bringing
   in horses for supper we were doing the lastest version of "OH I forget
   where I am suppose to be."  The grey horses are  in the back barn
   and the chestnuts are in another. (Hey dont ask me why it just turns out
   that way).

   Kitty

It's funny how that happens!  This summer, we were out on a trail ride
with some neighbors.  We were going along an old road, riding in two
parallel lines.  One of the people near the back noticed that one line
consisted of 2 duns and 2 buckskins; the other one was 3 greys of
various shades and a roan appy!  The riders hadn't made any conscious
effort to arrange this; I can't say whether the horses had, or whether
it was just chance.

I have heard that horses prefer to be amongst critters of similar
color, i.e. will run off "odd-colored" horses.  Any stories?  (I can't
provide a data point, as my Fjords are all the same color, and my
pinto donkey is so "different" that I can see why the Fjords wouldn't
want to associate with her.  ;-) )

Marsha Jo Hannah                Murphy must have been a horseman--
La Honda, CA                    anything that can go wrong, will!

(P.S.---Kitty, best wishes on keeping the mares pregnant and healing
up the filly!)

 
 
 

Good News/Bad News (long)

Post by Wendy Miln » Sun, 12 Dec 1993 03:07:48

: When we went on a BLM roundup I noticed the same thing. Horses of the
: same color all stuck together. There were clumps of bays and clumps of
: lighter colored horses and clumps of multicolored appy type horses.  

*sarcastic mode on*
Watch out.  Some one might think that since horses segregate
themselves by color, it must be natures way of saying that
segregation is the right thing to do
*sarcastic mode off*

It's just one of those days.
--
Wendy

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Good News/Bad News (long)

Post by John A. Mcnul » Sun, 12 Dec 1993 10:10:01

I hate to throw a damper on this conversation, but aren't horses
color blind?  Patty, and I should know the answer to this after
taking Mammalogy at the Los Angeles County Museum.
 
 
 

Good News/Bad News (long)

Post by Michael Czeiszperger - Sun NC Development Cent » Sun, 12 Dec 1993 07:15:23


!When we went on a BLM roundup I noticed the same thing. Horses of the
!same color all stuck together. There were clumps of bays and clumps of
!lighter colored horses and clumps of multicolored appy type horses.  

Horses also seem to include color in their attractions to the opposite sex.
The head stallion at our barn is very attracted to the color white, and will
get all worked up over a white horse regardless of the sex.

---
Michael Czeiszperger             |  "Toyotas are irrelevant"
Audio Software, Sun Microsystems |  

(919) 460-8369                   |  

 
 
 

Good News/Bad News (long)

Post by Sheri Hastin » Sun, 12 Dec 1993 01:27:24

Quote:
>I have heard that horses prefer to be amongst critters of similar
>color, i.e. will run off "odd-colored" horses.  Any stories?  (I can't
>provide a data point, as my Fjords are all the same color, and my
>pinto donkey is so "different" that I can see why the Fjords wouldn't
>want to associate with her.  ;-) )

>Marsha Jo Hannah            Murphy must have been a horseman--

When we went on a BLM roundup I noticed the same thing. Horses of the
same color all stuck together. There were clumps of bays and clumps of
lighter colored horses and clumps of multicolored appy type horses.  

At my home I have one gray horse and 7 dark bays.  I used to think the
gray was just a natural pig.  He is always dirty.  Someone suggested to
me that maybe he was trying to fit in color wise. (He is the odd one out
usually.)  I don't know though. I still think he just likes to be dirty.
(Don't say the others just don't showthe dirt.  When Ibrush him there is
TONS of dirt coming off - way more than the others.  

Also, has anyone else noticed the horses all stand facing the same  
direction in the pasture?

Sheri

 
 
 

Good News/Bad News (long)

Post by Jonas Herberts » Tue, 14 Dec 1993 22:26:44

Quote:
Sheri Hastings writes:
>John A. Mcnulty writes:
>>I hate to throw a damper on this conversation, but aren't horses
>>color blind?  Patty, and I should know the answer to this after
>>taking Mammalogy at the Los Angeles County Museum.

>I think you are right with regards to similar colors -- bays and chestnuts
>for example but I think they can distinguish dark from light colors and
>that is always the kind of color grouping I've noticed in "big"(more than
>five or six) herds. For example, the bays and chestnusts would be in one
>group and the grays in another.      

>-Sheri

They can not only distinguish between dark and light colors. I've read about
a study where they taught horses to distinguish between different colored
feed buckets. I don't remember exactly what colors horses most easily could
distinguish between, but they definitely didn't have the same capacity as
humans.

BTW isn't this that makes that some colors of jumping fences causes
more problems than other colors?

Jonas

 
 
 

Good News/Bad News (long)

Post by Michelle Clina » Tue, 14 Dec 1993 23:55:14

Maggie (18-year-old chestnut ASB) used to be *terrified* of anything
light-colored.  She wasn't afraid of boats or army tanks or anything
like that.  She was frightened of light-colored big rocks, and white
mailboxes, and once I got to post a trot...backwards...when she saw a
white goat.  Then she had Cassie (bay and white pinto, lots of white).
Now white isn't nearly so scary.  She even had a best friend for a
while that was a gray ASB after Cassie was weaned.

-Michelle, Maggie, and Cassie

 
 
 

Good News/Bad News (long)

Post by Karin L Tra » Wed, 15 Dec 1993 00:09:34

Quote:


>!When we went on a BLM roundup I noticed the same thing. Horses of the
>!same color all stuck together. There were clumps of bays and clumps of
>!lighter colored horses and clumps of multicolored appy type horses.

>Horses also seem to include color in their attractions to the opposite sex.
>The head stallion at our barn is very attracted to the color white, and will
>get all worked up over a white horse regardless of the sex.

>---
>Michael Czeiszperger             |  "Toyotas are irrelevant"
>Audio Software, Sun Microsystems |

>(919) 460-8369                   |

My black Morgan stallion (now gelding) loved Palaminos, either sex.
I was always thankful that the color is rarely seen in Morgans!
                                   Karin Tracy and THE MIGHTY MORGANS
 
 
 

Good News/Bad News (long)

Post by Lisa Alison Lomba » Wed, 15 Dec 1993 00:09:53

: They can not only distinguish between dark and light colors. I've read about
: a study where they taught horses to distinguish between different colored
: feed buckets. I don't remember exactly what colors horses most easily could
: distinguish between, but they definitely didn't have the same capacity as
: humans.

: BTW isn't this that makes that some colors of jumping fences causes
: more problems than other colors?

        Yes, but difficulity with jump colors often has to do with being able
to distinguish the rails from the ground - that's why yellow is so difficult,
since it can easily blend in with the (often) sandy-colored area.  Add that
to bad color vision, and you have a hard jump!

Lisa and
The Amherst Equestrian Team
(GO AMHERST!!)

 
 
 

Good News/Bad News (long)

Post by Mary Heal » Wed, 15 Dec 1993 02:18:32


Quote:

>At my home I have one gray horse and 7 dark bays.  I used to think the
>gray was just a natural pig.  He is always dirty.  Someone suggested to
>me that maybe he was trying to fit in color wise. (He is the odd one out
>usually.)  I don't know though. I still think he just likes to be dirty.
>(Don't say the others just don't showthe dirt.  When Ibrush him there is
>TONS of dirt coming off - way more than the others.

There is a RULE of GREY HORSES - "thou shalt take *every*
opportunity to become as dirty as possible".  Any grey (or pinto
with lots of white) that refuses to resemble Pigpen will be ejected
from the Fraternal Order of Greys.  It's a law - ask your grey
horse!
--
Mary and the Ames National Zoo:
     Raise a Fund ("Regis", 8yo TB)
     ANZ Sam-I-Am (4yo ACDx) & ANZ Noah Doll (11 mo ACD)
     Emma, Gareth, Rhiannon & Sibyl (cats from h*ll)
     more finches and fish every day!