Need help with barn rules.

Need help with barn rules.

Post by Angela Viss » Sun, 04 Feb 1996 04:00:00


I am a boarder at a small barn (16 or so horses).  I would like to
know what proper etiquette is for the public areas i.e. the arena and
the area not the arena or the stalls (where people tack up and so
forth).  

Today there was an incident where one of the other boarders let her
horse loose in this area where people tack up and walk there horses.  
The horse went crazy, running back and forth.  It ran over to the
stalls with my horses where I was putting a blanket on.  This made my
horses canter in their pens, knocking me over.  Am I wrong or is this
completely dangerous?  The horse was running around so fast in this
area and causing all the horses to run around that the only safe
place for me to go was on top of a fence!

The owner of the horse claims this is allowed (although I don't know
why).  And she screamed at me for telling her to put her horse away
(I may have not been to nice because I had already been injured due
to this danngerous act).

Does anyone know how to tell the barn owner this is not a good thing,
or how to approach the owner of the crazed horse that she shouldn't
do this?  Also that her horses are dangerous to put blankets on
because they have no training (they kick and bite the two of us who
do this for her)?  

Please help with suggestions.


 
 
 

Need help with barn rules.

Post by Mary La » Sun, 04 Feb 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

>I am a boarder at a small barn (16 or so horses).  I would like to
>know what proper etiquette is for the public areas i.e. the arena and
>the area not the arena or the stalls (where people tack up and so
>forth).  

This list is essentially common courtesy.  Most barns extract about 10
major rules from this list.  I may have omitted some points as it's
composed strictly from memory ...

        Tacking up:
                - Your horse must be secured, or in his
                pen when tacking up.  Ground tying is
                typically frowned upon as so may people
                have not truly taught their horses to
                ground tie properly.
                - Always clean up after your horse in
                aisles, cross-ties, and wash-racks.  This
                includes droppings from picking your horse's
                hooves, swabbing up urine, and picking up
                manure your horse leaves behind.  Also,
                sweep up main/tail/coat hair.  Essentially,
                the next person should not be able to tell
                you were just there.
                - Your tack should be left out of the aisles
                and out of harms way.  Do not leave tack boxes
                open in the aisles with blankets draped into the
                aisles.  Do not leave your equipment around for
                others to trip over.
                - If your stall has a gate that swings into the
                aisle, close the gate so the aisle is clear.
                - ALWAYS KEEP THE AISLE CLEAR.  Horses cross-
                tied in the aisle are the exception to that
                rule.

        Arenas:
                - When entering or exiting an arena always
                        close the gate behind you, unless
                        you're the last one in the arena.
                        Some barns ask that you yell "GATE!!!"
                        before you open the gate so riders
                        will not smash into you.  You should
                        open the gate outward, if possible so
                        you don't deck someone as you open the
                        gate.
                - Priorities are typically as follows:
                        - riders have first right to use
                        arenas.
                        - those who want to lunge horses
                        have second right.  They typically
                        should seek permission to lunge if
                        there are other riders in the arena.
                        Typically, no more than TWO horses
                        lunging in an arena where riders
                        are working their horses.
                                - If a horse is going bonkers
                                while lunging, which spooks
                                other horses in the arena you
                                may be asked to leave.
                        - loose horses have essentially no
                        rights and may be bumped out of the
                        arena by anyone who wants to use it
                        (exc. other horses to be turned out,
                        in which case one should be *reasonable*
                        about sharing the arena for these purposes.)
                - Should a rider fall off their horse, or horse
                        gets loose in the arena ALL riders,
                        lungers, etc. should immediately stop
                        their horses until the loose horse has
                        been caught and the rider has been
                        removed from the arena if they are
                        seriously injured.
                - Passing horses on the rail.  Some barns ask that
                        those people just walking their horses on
                        "the buckle" or talking stay off the rail.
                        But passing horses - typically a horse is
                        passed on the *inside* (off the rail).  So,
                        if you're overtaking a horse trotting you'd
                        move off the rail to do so.  Passing oncoming
                        horses is typically left hand to left hand.
                        (I hate going clockwise for just this reason -
                        I'm always moving off the rail.)  
                        Horses circling more than once typically
                        yield to those horses on the rail (staying
                        off the rail for oncoming horses to continue
                        on by)
                - Abrupt stops:  If you know there's a horse
                        approaching from the rear you might want
                        to warn them you're about to make an
                        abrupt stop.

Quote:

>Today there was an incident where one of the other boarders let her
>horse loose in this area where people tack up and walk there horses.

<snipped>

If I understand what happened (which I'm not certain I do) then this
action was incredibly dangerous and absolutely stupid.  Personally,
when my horse or my own life has been put in danger by stupidity I
light into the offender mercilessly in the hopes that their actions
will never be replayed.  However, if you're unable for some reason to
get across to the offender the dangerousness of their actions then you
definitely should seek assistance of the management.

If a manager is unwilling to enforce safety rules, talk with a trainer
and ask them to speak to the offender.  Most people will listen to
trainers before they'll listen to fellow riders.

Quote:
>The owner of the horse claims this is allowed (although I don't know
>why).  And she screamed at me for telling her to put her horse away
>(I may have not been to nice because I had already been injured due
>to this danngerous act).

I'm actually not clear if this horse was running around in a turn-out
area next to the stalls or literally down the middle of the aisle
LOOSE.  Sometimes turn-out areas can be right next to stalls, in which
case you just have to swallow the bad with the good and take care not
to get hurt as your horse responds to the nutsoid near his/her stall.

But if the horse was NOT in an authorized turn-out area then no amount
of screaming will change the fact that she was being stupid and
abusive.  In that case, speak with the manager.  They may want to post
an explicit rule about loose horses.

Quote:

>Does anyone know how to tell the barn owner this is not a good thing,
>or how to approach the owner of the crazed horse that she shouldn't
>do this?  Also that her horses are dangerous to put blankets on
>because they have no training (they kick and bite the two of us who
>do this for her)?  

Most barn owners are anxious to avoid law-suits and if they hear of
someone out of control they are typically very willing to deal with
them.  Telling them is *usually* not difficult.

Telling the woman is another story.  She obviously was convinced she
was in the right.  It sounds like you did all you could do.  Next step
would be to raise a flag and make an issue about the problem with the
management.

As for blanketing her horses -- whatareyounuts!  You must have a heart
of gold or a head filled with cotton to work with crazed animals owned
by a woman who refuses to train them.  Sorry Charlie.  This tuna says
"Not on your life ... blanket your own mules!"

I would like to take this opportunity to publicly apologize to all
mule owners for my recent slur.  ;-)

Posting rules at barns is never a bad idea.  If rules are not already
posted there I would advise lobbying long and hard to get them posted.

Good luck!

--Mary

Concord, CA

P.S.  We had a list started about dangerous things to avoid around
horses ... like buckeling the front of blankets before buckling the
stomach straps, etc.  I don't think I saw barn rules or etiquette
mentioned in this list.  

Does anyone have the comprehensive list we put together?  Maybe we
should add this ... and the other follow-up posts to that list.

 
 
 

Need help with barn rules.

Post by Staneile » Sun, 04 Feb 1996 04:00:00

Quote:

>P.S.  We had a list started about dangerous things to avoid around
>horses ... like buckeling the front of blankets before buckling the
>stomach straps, etc.  I don't think I saw barn rules or etiquette
>mentioned in this list.  

I didn't know this.  Why is it dangerous to buckle the front first?
Because then the blanket could theoretically get entangled in the horse's
feet if it falls off, or if the horse moves suddenly?  

 
 
 

Need help with barn rules.

Post by Callie Brew » Mon, 05 Feb 1996 04:00:00

Quote:

>>P.S.  We had a list started about dangerous things to avoid around
>>horses ... like buckeling the front of blankets before buckling the
>>stomach straps, etc.  I don't think I saw barn rules or etiquette
>>mentioned in this list.  

>I didn't know this.  Why is it dangerous to buckle the front first?
>Because then the blanket could theoretically get entangled in the horse's
>feet if it falls off, or if the horse moves suddenly?  

It is better to buckle the front first because if the blanket is on straight,
it is enough to hold it on the horse.  If you buckled the belly straps or leg
straps first, if the horse bolted, the blanket would slide back, and become
entangled in the hind legs.  (How many horses have you seen come in with belly
straps undone, and leg straps broken that are just fine, and the blanket is
still on them?  I've seen many that way.)
 
 
 

Need help with barn rules.

Post by Betsy Ha » Mon, 05 Feb 1996 04:00:00


(snip of excellent list of typical barn rules)

Quote:
>If a manager is unwilling to enforce safety rules, talk with a trainer
>and ask them to speak to the offender.  Most people will listen to
>trainers before they'll listen to fellow riders....Most barn owners
>are anxious to avoid law-suits and if they hear of someone out of
>control they are typically very willing to deal with them....
>Posting rules at barns is never a bad idea.  If rules are not already
>posted there I would advise lobbying long and hard to get them posted.

Good advice.

Quote:
>P.S.  We had a list started about dangerous things to avoid around
>horses ... like buckeling the front of blankets before buckling the
>stomach straps, etc.

I was taught that buckling the front of the blanket before the
stomach straps was something to *do*, not to *avoid*, or is that
what you were trying to say?
--
BETSY HALE - Performing artist:  Actress, Singer, Dancer
        Horse trainer: Dressage & Jumping - adhering to classical principles
        of lightness, harmony and elegance.

 
 
 

Need help with barn rules.

Post by neils » Mon, 05 Feb 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

> ...
>Today there was an incident where one of the other boarders let her
>horse loose in this area where people tack up and walk their horses.  
>The horse went crazy, running back and forth. ...

>The owner of the horse claims this is allowed (although I don't know
>why).  And she screamed at me for telling her to put her horse away
>(I may have not been to nice because I had already been injured due
>to this dangerous act). ...

Because you didn't get anywhere with your suggestions, my wife
suggests a letter from your lawyer to each of them, the horse owner
and the barn owner, that you were injured by this dangerous act, and
to whichever one of them owns those horses that kick and bite when
being blanketed.  You lawyer can explain all this better than we can.

What'll happen is that neither of them will then be able to ignore the
situation.  If there are future accidents relating to these problems,
and they hadn't put in new rules (and followed them) they can't avoid
liability by saying, "I didn't know that was going to happen."  There
is a difference between the inherent unpredictability of horses, on
the one hand, and negligence on the other.  Your lawyer will be able
to help you figure out how all this works in your area.  Your state or
province (or amt or oblast) or country has its own particular rules
for determining negligence.

If you feel that all this would be too much trouble, or you don't want
to bother finding a good lawyer, think again.  You are now in the best
position you can be to prevent a tragic accident at the barn.  Please
do it.  My wife says she DIDN'T do this when she could have, and has
always regretted it because someone was badly injured, nearly killed.

--

Peter Neilson                      Now living in North Carolina.  Half
6040-A Six Forks Rd, Suite 150     the horses are here.  We have just found
Raleigh NC 27609                   farmland to buy.  No house, no barn.

 
 
 

Need help with barn rules.

Post by Albert J. Lum » Mon, 05 Feb 1996 04:00:00

Here's the "short form" version of our rules.
We also have a longer, legalistic, version that everyone signs as an
addendum to our board agreement form.

TOP 12 WAYS TO SHORTEN YOUR STAY AT A & J
a.k.a.  The A& J Ranch rules made simple...10/2/94

*INVITE YOUR FRIENDS & ACQUAINTENCES TO COME UP AND PARTY ANY TIME THEY
FEEL LIKE IT.

*LEAVE THE LIGHTS ON WHEN YOU ARE THE LAST PERSON TO LEAVE.

*LEAVE YOUR CHILDREN HERE WHILE YOU'RE OFF RIDING EVEN THOUGH YOU WOULD
NOT CONSIDER THEM MATURE ENOUGH TO LEAVE ALONE AT YOUR HOME.
(SAME GOES FOR DOGS).

*LEAVE YOUR HORSE UN-ATTENDED IN RIDING ARENA INSTEAD OF TURN-OUT
ARENA.  (i.e. HAVE LITTLE OR NO CONCERN FOR OTHERS).

*PAY YOUR BOARD AFTER MONTH END WITH A CHECK WRITTEN FOR THE "EARLY
PAY" DISCOUNTED AMOUNT & HAVE SOMEONE DELIVER IT FOR YOU.  

*SMOKE IN THE BARNS OR DO *** ON THE PROPERTY.

*MAKE A HIGH SPEED "GRAND ENTRANCE / DEPARTURE" AND JUST TO INSURE ALL
KNOW YOU ARE HERE, BLOCK THE DRIVEWAYS & PARKING AREAS.

*ABUSE YOUR HORSE(S)...THIS INCLUDES FAILURE TO HAVE REGULAR VET CHECKS
& HOOF T***S  OR TO  REGULARLY CLEAN  YOUR  STALL(S).

*DON'T USE ANY "COMMON SENSE".

*FAIL TO NOTIFY OWNERS  OF PROBLEMS SUCH AS:  WATER LEAKS, PROBLEM
BOARDERS OR GUESTS, OR DAMAGE (ESPECIALLY DAMAGE FOR WHICH YOU ARE
RESPONSIBLE).

*HANG AROUND THE RANCH AFTER 10 PM (ESPECIALLY SUNDAY THRU THURSDAY
NITES).

*"BORROW" FROM THE OWNERS, TENANTS, OR OTHER BOARDERS WITHOUT TELLING
THEM.
--
Al Lumas
A&J Ranch, Milpitas, CA

http://SportToday.org/

 
 
 

Need help with barn rules.

Post by Roger & Jean Hal » Mon, 05 Feb 1996 04:00:00

Quote:

>I am a boarder at a small barn (16 or so horses).  I would like to
>know what proper etiquette is for the public areas i.e. the arena and
>the area not the arena or the stalls (where people tack up and so
>forth).  

Generally, there are 2 sets of rules, one for the arena or riding areas,
and another for the stalls, barns and common work area.  You are sure to
get lots n lots of ideas from folks.  Of course, the appropriate rules
depend on your boarding situation.  For the arena, I've found the best the
we've done for a busy arena is to post a scheduale for different
activities (jumping, lunging, etc.)  That helps cure a lot of conflicts.  

Quote:
>Today there was an incident where one of the other boarders let her
>horse loose in this area where people tack up and walk there horses.  
>The horse went crazy, running back and forth.  
[snip]
>The owner of the horse claims this is allowed (although I don't know
>why).  And she screamed at me for telling her to put her horse away
>(I may have not been to nice because I had already been injured due
>to this danngerous act).

Sure she's telling the truth?

Quote:
>Does anyone know how to tell the barn owner this is not a good thing,

Tell the barn owner if they allow this type of dangerous behaviour, they
are setting themselves up for a lawsuit *when* someone and/or their horse
is injured.  (because it will happen)

Quote:
>or how to approach the owner of the crazed horse that she shouldn't
>do this?  Also that her horses are dangerous to put blankets on
>because they have no training (they kick and bite the two of us who
>do this for her)?  

Why do you do anything for a person like this?  Doesn't sound like she
deserves any favors to me, especially if her horses are as dangerous as
you say.  It's not worth being injured/maimed/killed by someone else's
problems (leave that to your own horses to do;).)  If the problems
continue, I'd seriously look for another barn.  Sounds like yours may have
some serious mangement problems.
 
 
 

Need help with barn rules.

Post by kristih.. » Mon, 05 Feb 1996 04:00:00

Quote:

>Today there was an incident where one of the other boarders let her
>horse loose in this area where people tack up and walk there horses.  
>The horse went crazy, running back and forth.  It ran over to the
>stalls with my horses where I was putting a blanket on.  This made my
>horses canter in their pens, knocking me over.  Am I wrong or is this
>completely dangerous?  The horse was running around so fast in this
>area and causing all the horses to run around that the only safe
>place for me to go was on top of a fence!

This woman turned her horse loose in the saddling area *on
purpose*?  I.e. the horse did not accidentally get loose?
She's insane.  The fact that a huge commotion resulted from
this shows quite clearly that it is not a safe thing to do.

Quote:
>The owner of the horse claims this is allowed (although I don't know
>why).  And she screamed at me for telling her to put her horse away
>(I may have not been to nice because I had already been injured due
>to this danngerous act).

She's full of BS.  You don't let a horse loose in an area where
people are tacking up.  If this woman does this on purpose, on
a regular basis, this definitely needs to go to the owner of
the place.

Quote:
>Does anyone know how to tell the barn owner this is not a good thing,
>or how to approach the owner of the crazed horse that she shouldn't
>do this?  Also that her horses are dangerous to put blankets on
>because they have no training (they kick and bite the two of us who
>do this for her)?  

The only way to tell the barn owner is to tell the barn owner.
Tell him or her exactly what happened (emphasize that you were
in fact injured; the word "lawsuit" will dance freely through
the owner's head without you even suggesting it).  Then ask
the owner what's going to be done about it.  If you don't get
a satisfactory answer, switch barns.
And please, quit blanketing this lady's horses.  You are under
no obligation to care for dangerous horses that belong to
someone else, particularly after what happened when she turned
one of them loose.  Let her blanket her own horses.


 
 
 

Need help with barn rules.

Post by Francy Le » Tue, 06 Feb 1996 04:00:00

Quote:


>>>P.S.  We had a list started about dangerous things to avoid around
>>>horses ... like buckeling the front of blankets before buckling the
>>>stomach straps, etc.  I don't think I saw barn rules or etiquette
>>>mentioned in this list.  

>>I didn't know this.  Why is it dangerous to buckle the front first?
>>Because then the blanket could theoretically get entangled in the horse's
>>feet if it falls off, or if the horse moves suddenly?  
>It is better to buckle the front first because if the blanket is on straight,
>it is enough to hold it on the horse.  If you buckled the belly straps or leg
>straps first, if the horse bolted, the blanket would slide back, and become
>entangled in the hind legs.  (How many horses have you seen come in with belly
>straps undone, and leg straps broken that are just fine, and the blanket is
>still on them?  I've seen many that way.)

I was told the same, to buckle the front first, then the left hind,
then the belly, and lastly the Rt. rear.  

Here is a scarry story 2 weeks ago a horse in our barn (who is
particularly pron to accidents ) got his blanket cought on his feeder.
(the kind that is above with a rack)  Luckily a girl came to ride in
the evening and found the horse *** to death and cut off the
blanket.  The m***of the story, never, never think a blanket is
safe, or that nothing can happen in the stall. And ALWAYS carry a
knife at the barn.