Omolene 100 - a hot grain?

Omolene 100 - a hot grain?

Post by Kalah Bracket » Wed, 24 Apr 1996 04:00:00


I had been giving my horse the 'normal' grain (corn, oat, barley,
molasses) for over a year.  I had heard of something called 'Purina 12-12'
or something from this group (supposed to be a free choice vitamin thing).
Well, I decided that I wanted to try that, so up to the local feed store I
went.

Well, they said that they didn't have that, but since I wanted the
vitamins and to get my horses coat nice 'n shiny, (and also drop a
*little* weight), they said, "Here.  Try this."  It was Omolene 100; buy
two bags get two free.  So I said, "Well, okay."  

Now a few days ago, after about 2 weeks of being on Omolene, a friend of
mine said, "He shouldn't be getting that.  That's a hot grain.  Makes 'em
hot."  Now today, there's a huge question mark over my head.

Why would Omolene be a hot feed, and should I save it for cold nights and
the winter?  Should I go ahead and switch back to my original grain?  I
got a weight tape with the grain, but my horse is very big and sort of
went off the tape.  (He's a quarter horse, but people think he's part
Percheron).  Right now he isn't on pasture, but will be in about two
weeks, if that matters at all.

Thank you for any answers you may give.

California Cruisin'
Kalah B

 
 
 

Omolene 100 - a hot grain?

Post by CA.. » Thu, 25 Apr 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

>I had been giving my horse the 'normal' grain (corn, oat, barley,
>molasses) for over a year.  I had heard of something called 'Purina 12-12'
>or something from this group (supposed to be a free choice vitamin thing).
>Well, I decided that I wanted to try that, so up to the local feed store I
>went.

>Well, they said that they didn't have that, but since I wanted the
>vitamins and to get my horses coat nice 'n shiny, (and also drop a
>*little* weight), they said, "Here.  Try this."  It was Omolene 100; buy
>two bags get two free.  So I said, "Well, okay."

>Now a few days ago, after about 2 weeks of being on Omolene, a friend of
>mine said, "He shouldn't be getting that.  That's a hot grain.  Makes 'em
>hot."  Now today, there's a huge question mark over my head.

>Why would Omolene be a hot feed, and should I save it for cold nights and
>the winter?  Should I go ahead and switch back to my original grain?  I
>got a weight tape with the grain, but my horse is very big and sort of
>went off the tape.  (He's a quarter horse, but people think he's part
>Percheron).  Right now he isn't on pasture, but will be in about two
>weeks, if that matters at all.

>Thank you for any answers you may give.

>California Cruisin'
>Kalah B

Kalah:
      I feed both my horses Omolene 100 - because I don't wan't to feed them a
"hot" feed.  The 100 relates to the % of protien (I think 10% in this case).
Omolene also has a 200 and a 300 - higher protein for different purposes.  My
mares energy level has decreased on this feed.
   Cheryl

 
 
 

Omolene 100 - a hot grain?

Post by Mary Rossan » Fri, 26 Apr 1996 04:00:00

Quote:

>I had been giving my horse the 'normal' grain (corn, oat, barley,
>molasses) for over a year.

<snip>

Quote:
>Well, they said that they didn't have that, but since I wanted the
>vitamins and to get my horses coat nice 'n shiny, (and also drop a
>*little* weight), they said, "Here.  Try this."  It was Omolene 100; buy
>two bags get two free.  So I said, "Well, okay."  

>Now a few days ago, after about 2 weeks of being on Omolene, a friend of
>mine said, "He shouldn't be getting that.  That's a hot grain.  Makes >'em hot."  Now today, there's a huge question mark over my h=
ead.

>Why would Omolene be a hot feed, and should I save it for cold nights >and the winter?  Should I go ahead and switch back to my ori=

ginal grain? >I got a weight tape with the grain, but my horse is very big and sort of

Quote:
>went off the tape.  (He's a quarter horse, but people think he's part
>Percheron).  Right now he isn't on pasture, but will be in about two
>weeks, if that matters at all.

Omolene 100 is the lowest protein sweet feed Purina makes (~10%, I
think).  It probably contains about the same amount of energy as the
corn, barley, oat sweet feed you were using.  If your friend was refering
to "hot" in the energy sense, you would expect the horse to be more
excitable.  If she was using "hot" in the temperature sense, she is
incorrect.  Fermentation of hays produces more heat than grain does.

I wouldn't expect the Omolene 100 to differ much from your original feed
(except in price ;->).  If your horse is too fat, try feeding less (or
no) grain.  Heck, they do very well on good pasture and trace mineral
salt alone - sometimes too well.  Remember, there is no rule that horses
must eat grain!

Mary Rossano

 
 
 

Omolene 100 - a hot grain?

Post by Bruce & Bonnie Jackso » Fri, 26 Apr 1996 04:00:00

Quote:

> >I had been giving my horse the 'normal' grain (corn, oat, barley,
> >molasses) for over a year.

> I wouldn't expect the Omolene 100 to differ much from your original feed
> (except in price ;->).  If your horse is too fat, try feeding less (or
> no) grain.  Heck, they do very well on good pasture and trace mineral
> salt alone - sometimes too well.  Remember, there is no rule that horses
> must eat grain!

I like Mary's answer, but would add that only horses whose activity
levels warrant it, should be fed concentrated food. If you're trying
to help a horse lose weight (or calm down) cut out everything but
forage.(Just like cutting out sweets when dieting) All horses'
metabolisms vary. One horse will utilize grain without any bad effects
while another will put on weight, manifest a high degree of
nervousness and may even founder. Ask your vet what he or she would
recommend (given your horse's use) before deciding on any high-priced
supplemental feed.
Bonnie in AZ (Whose Andy mare <looks> at food and puts on weight!)
 
 
 

Omolene 100 - a hot grain?

Post by Curt Emanue » Sat, 27 Apr 1996 04:00:00

Quote:

> I had been giving my horse the 'normal' grain (corn, oat, barley,
> molasses) for over a year.  I had heard of something called 'Purina 12-12'
> or something from this group (supposed to be a free choice vitamin thing).
> Well, I decided that I wanted to try that, so up to the local feed store I
> went.

> Well, they said that they didn't have that, but since I wanted the
> vitamins and to get my horses coat nice 'n shiny, (and also drop a
> *little* weight), they said, "Here.  Try this."  It was Omolene 100; buy
> two bags get two free.  So I said, "Well, okay."

> Now a few days ago, after about 2 weeks of being on Omolene, a friend of
> mine said, "He shouldn't be getting that.  That's a hot grain.  Makes 'em
> hot."  Now today, there's a huge question mark over my head.

> Why would Omolene be a hot feed, and should I save it for cold nights and
> the winter?  Should I go ahead and switch back to my original grain?  I
> got a weight tape with the grain, but my horse is very big and sort of
> went off the tape.  (He's a quarter horse, but people think he's part
> Percheron).  Right now he isn't on pasture, but will be in about two
> weeks, if that matters at all.

> Thank you for any answers you may give.

> California Cruisin'
> Kalah B

What your friend meant by "hot" was that this feed will give your horse
a lot of energy - possibly too much - so he becomes high strung - sort
of like what happens to people when they get a boost from eating
chocolate or drinking soft drinks (Mountain Dew is the worst).

Many people feel that horses require a very high amount of protein in
their feed. I don't know how much Omolene has but for most mature horses
10% protein is plenty. You can get this by feeding oats along with good
quality mixed hay (forage testing is fairly inexpensive and usually a
good idea so you know what you're feeding). I always cringe when I see
people feeding 16-18% protein rations because so much of that protein is
being broken down into energy, stored as fat, excreted as nitrogen -
anything but going towards what it's meant to do - muscle maintenance
and growth.

Now in growing horses, especially foals, and to a lesser extent for
pregnant mares, a higher amount of protein is OK.

I've found from experience that when I have a horse that's too "hot" I
usually get more mileage out of reducing protein in the diet than
energy. Energy requirements can be kept pretty close to ideal by
observing body condition - eyeballing. I used to feed very high quality
alfalfa hay and have been much happier when I switched to grass hay for
my mature horses, saving the alfalfa for the babies and mares w/foals or
in their last trimester.

Generally I try to keep my sweat feed (I have it mixed) at 10% and add
soybean oil meal when I need protein.

Also, I gather from your post that your horse is too fat. Try this to
check - run your hand along his side, firmly but gently. You should be
able to feel his ribs. If you can't he's probably too fat. If you can
SEE his ribs (with a short or summer haircoat) then he's probably too
thin. It's a very rough check - but I don't want to get into body
condition scoring here - but it's also maybe the best one I know of to
tell if your horse is too fat.

Curt

 
 
 

Omolene 100 - a hot grain?

Post by Priscilla Dan » Sat, 27 Apr 1996 04:00:00


Quote:
> If you're trying
>to help a horse lose weight (or calm down) cut out everything but
>forage.(Just like cutting out sweets when dieting) All horses'
>metabolisms vary. One horse will utilize grain without any bad effects
>while another will put on weight, manifest a high degree of
>nervousness and may even founder. Ask your vet what he or she would
>recommend (given your horse's use) before deciding on any high-priced
>supplemental feed.
>Bonnie in AZ (Whose Andy mare <looks> at food and puts on weight!)

I don't think people should cut down on grain just to calm an excitable horse;
change what they're feeding, but not eliminate.  I've seen horses that were
very thin because their owners cut back on their feed in order to "calm them".
 By experimentation, you can determine what feed will put/keep weight on a
horse without making him harder to handle.

Priscilla

 
 
 

Omolene 100 - a hot grain?

Post by Lucy Goodend » Thu, 02 May 1996 04:00:00

Quote:


> > >I had been giving my horse the 'normal' grain (corn, oat, barley,
> > >molasses) for over a year.

> > I wouldn't expect the Omolene 100 to differ much from your original feed
> > (except in price ;->).  If your horse is too fat, try feeding less (or
> > no) grain.  Heck, they do very well on good pasture and trace mineral
> > salt alone - sometimes too well.  Remember, there is no rule that horses
> > must eat grain!

> I like Mary's answer, but would add that only horses whose activity
> levels warrant it, should be fed concentrated food.
[snip]
> Bonnie in AZ (Whose Andy mare <looks> at food and puts on weight!)

I agree with all the above, but would add that if you are
feeding only forage it tends to be high in calcium and
low in phosphorus for a horse's needs, so you must have
free-choice minerals available.  Grains tend to be
high in phosphorus and low in calcium.

Omolene 100 isn't a particularly "hot" grain, it's
about equal to most 10% protein sweet feeds, just that
it's laboratory checked to be sure the nutrients
listed on the bag are actually present in the amounts
stated.  Just that some horses don't need any
type of concentrated feed to get fat and act
spirited.  Just ask any of ours!

   Lucy Goodenday          Rancho BuenosDias Paso Fino Horses

"A fine little smooth horse colt should move a man as much as doth a son."               -- Thomas Kyd  (1558-1594)

 
 
 

Omolene 100 - a hot grain?

Post by John Hasl » Fri, 03 May 1996 04:00:00

Quote:
Lucy Goodenday writes:
> I agree with all the above, but would add that if you are
> feeding only forage it tends to be high in calcium and
> low in phosphorus for a horse's needs, so you must have
> free-choice minerals available.

That is true of alfalfa, but not grass.
--

John Hasler                This posting is in the public domain.

Dancing Horse Hill         Make money from it if you can; I don't mind.
Elmwood, Wisconsin