training questions

training questions

Post by John T. Klausn » Wed, 12 Nov 1997 04:00:00


John Lyons tapes are a good place to start.
SueK


Quote:

>Hello all,
>    I was wondering if anyone here might be willing to help someone
fairly new
>to horses.  I got my first horse about a week back and need some
advice on
>breaking him to drive and to ride.  He is a 3 and 1/2 year old arabian
that
>has not been handled much over the past year.  He was used to having
other
>horses around but has responded well to being alone, he has gotten
alot
>more attention from humans lately.  It only took a couple days work to
get
>him used to human contact ( I dont know how long it should have
taken).  I
>was just wondering if anyone could give me any leads on good resources
for
>a beginner.  Web sites, books, videos, anything at all would help.

>Thank you in advance for your time
>Chris Gutzmer


 
 
 

training questions

Post by Bob Well » Wed, 12 Nov 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

>I guess I will finish by saying "A pox on those who sell green horses to
>the uninitiated."

He, he, he...  At LEAST "a pox"!

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training questions

Post by Kirsti Stephens » Wed, 12 Nov 1997 04:00:00



Quote:
>Hello all,
>    I was wondering if anyone here might be willing to help someone fairly new
>to horses.  I got my first horse about a week back and need some advice on
>breaking him to drive and to ride.  He is a 3 and 1/2 year old arabian that
>has not been handled much over the past year.  He was used to having other
>horses around but has responded well to being alone, he has gotten alot
>more attention from humans lately.  It only took a couple days work to get
>him used to human contact ( I dont know how long it should have taken).  I
>was just wondering if anyone could give me any leads on good resources for
>a beginner.  Web sites, books, videos, anything at all would help.

>Thank you in advance for your time
>Chris Gutzmer


Chris,

Web sites, books, videos and anything else but some hands on training,
for you and your horse,  by a professional will be a waste of your
time and may ruin a potentially good horse. Not to mention the fact
that you could get seriously injured.

Green owners and green horses are never a good match... never.

Kirsti

 
 
 

training questions

Post by Chris Gutzme » Wed, 12 Nov 1997 04:00:00

Hello all,
        I was wondering if anyone here might be willing to help someone fairly new
to horses.  I got my first horse about a week back and need some advice on
breaking him to drive and to ride.  He is a 3 and 1/2 year old arabian that
has not been handled much over the past year.  He was used to having other
horses around but has responded well to being alone, he has gotten alot
more attention from humans lately.  It only took a couple days work to get
him used to human contact ( I dont know how long it should have taken).  I
was just wondering if anyone could give me any leads on good resources for
a beginner.  Web sites, books, videos, anything at all would help.

Thank you in advance for your time
Chris Gutzmer

 
 
 

training questions

Post by Grant Harri » Wed, 12 Nov 1997 04:00:00


Quote:
>    I was wondering if anyone here might be willing to help someone fairly new
> to horses.  I got my first horse about a week back and need some advice on
> breaking him to drive and to ride.  He is a 3 and 1/2 year old arabian that
> has not been handled much over the past year.  He was used to having other
> horses around but has responded well to being alone, he has gotten alot
> more attention from humans lately.  It only took a couple days work to get
> him used to human contact ( I dont know how long it should have taken).  I
> was just wondering if anyone could give me any leads on good resources for
> a beginner.  Web sites, books, videos, anything at all would help.
> Thank you in advance for your time

Chris:

If you are that new to horses and riding, you need to find a professional
to break & train your horse.  You also need to find a professional to
train you, if you don't already have one.

See our Instruction page for links to some good sites.

Grant Harris, Baltimore Horse Country
http://www.bcpl.lib.md.us/~gharris/home.html

 
 
 

training questions

Post by Richard Botteri » Thu, 13 Nov 1997 04:00:00



Quote:
>Hello all,
>    I was wondering if anyone here might be willing to help someone fairly new
>to horses.  

Can you tell us exactly =how= new you are to horses?  Have you taken
any riding lessons and, if so, for how long?

Quote:
>I got my first horse about a week back and need some advice on
>breaking him to drive and to ride.

[...]

Quote:
>I was just wondering if anyone could give me any leads on good resources for
>a beginner.  Web sites, books, videos, anything at all would help.

The very best thing you can do is find yourself a trainer who is
willing to teach you not only how to ride (and drive if that is what
you want) but also to direct this horse's training schedule.

I took about 2 years of riding lessons before I bought my QH from the
trainer who had taught me to ride.  Sonny was 4 1/2 years old and had
had 3 months of professional training, so he was "green-broke" (in
other words, he knew walk, trot, canter, halt, backup, and basic left
and right turns only).  I continued to take lessons from my trainer
for at least 1 1/2 years after that while I was still riding Western,
and began taking lessons from other trainers when I started riding
English.  In the early days with Sonny, these lessons were as much to
learn what new things I should be teaching him as they were for me to
improve my riding.  Thir*** years after buying him, I continue to
take lessons, but mostly to fine-tune my riding.

As far as books go, I'm not sure what to recommend for a complete
beginner.  Once you're beginning to feel comfortable riding and want
to refine things the first book I'd recommend to anyone is Sally
Swift's "Centred Riding."  It is full of wonderful images that are
useful to get you riding really "with" the horse.

But as I am sure many knowledgeable people will tell you, the =most=
important thing is to work with a horseman who is experienced in
training horses.  If I hadn't followed the route of working with a
trainer in lessons, it would have been like the blind leading the
blind, because I had to learn =everything= before I could begin to
teach it to my horse.

Good luck!

Richard and Sun Valley
Brandon, Manitoba, Canada

Spamblocked.  Replace 'zerospam' with 'galaxy' to reply.

 
 
 

training questions

Post by Chris Gutzme » Fri, 14 Nov 1997 04:00:00

 I guess I should have pointed out in the post that my best friend has been
riding and training horses for over twenty years.  I just wanted some
information of my own that I knew would be unbiased so I would at least
have a basic understanding of what my friend was helping me do with
Chamalle (Arabian for desert wind I am told).   I have also ridden with him
in the past on quite a few occasions so it is far from my first time on a
horse.
Thank you all very much



 
 
 

training questions

Post by Sparrowhaw » Fri, 14 Nov 1997 04:00:00

You've got a lot of courage taking on a youngster, but you need to find a
good trainer...you can either send the horse away to be backed or,
preferably, find a local trainer who will work with you /and/ the
horse...therefore sparing your much loved equine the problems that can
come from any mistakes you might make. (in any case, I feel /all/ horse
owners should have a trainer, even if they only visit him/her
occasionally, you can't, generally see your own mistakes no matter how
good/experienced you are).

as for how long it takes to get a horse used to people...it depends on the
individual horse. If it only took a couple of days, it sounds like you
have a good one. and don't neglect his ground manners...a well-trained
horse should stand to be groomed in a box stall without a halter, lead
willingly with the handler next to his shoulder, catch every time, go into
a horsebox or trailer without hesitation and treat the farrier with
appropriate respect. It is /amazing/ how many good, well-trained riding
horses are hellions once the rider gets off...

Tip...if he's never been shod, you can help him get used to the idea by
regularly picking up his feet and tapping around the edge of the hoof a
couple of times, lightly, with a hoofpick. Then again, when my
six-year-old was shod for the first time, he fell asleep during
proceedings! If it isn't a big fuss to you, it's less likely to be a big
fuss to the horse ;-).

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

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is wealth. Corn is wealth. Potable water is wealth. Gold is just money.

                - Spider Robinson

 
 
 

training questions

Post by Judy Darwi » Tue, 18 Nov 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

> Hello all,
>         I was wondering if anyone here might be willing to help someone fairly new
> to horses.  I got my first horse about a week back and need some advice on
> breaking him to drive and to ride.  He is a 3 and 1/2 year old arabian that
> has not been handled much over the past year.  He was used to having other
> horses around but has responded well to being alone, he has gotten alot
> more attention from humans lately.  It only took a couple days work to get
> him used to human contact ( I dont know how long it should have taken).  I
> was just wondering if anyone could give me any leads on good resources for
> a beginner.  Web sites, books, videos, anything at all would help.

> Thank you in advance for your time
> Chris Gutzmer


Hi Chris,

There is an excellent book by Tom Roberts called "Horse control- The
young horse", which was a wonderful help to me when, a few years ago
I found myself with a couple of young Arabs to break in and no
experience in horse breaking whatsoever. Very easy to read and to put
into practice.  Tom Roberts (an Australian) was a great horseman, and
a very good communicator.

Good luck with your project,
Judy