Discovering older coasters... my first step

Discovering older coasters... my first step

Post by Wayne Fol » Mon, 05 Sep 1994 00:47:44


I've ridden quite a few coasters and thought I had seen it all. King's
Dominion, a couple of Bush Gardens, DisneyWorld, DisneyLand, Hershey Park,
Six Flags Over Texas, Fiesta Texas, and scattered others.

But last week, I finally visited Kennywood. The old coasters (The Racer,
The Thunderbolt) *really* impressed me. Those old designers had a lot of
imagination, and did a lot of cool things without the benefit of steel
terrors.

I first rode the Steel Phantom, which had the expected terror factor, along
with lots of loops  and rolls (I couldn't walk straight when I got off), and,
of course, SPEED. After an 80-mph ride coming off of a huge lift, the lifts
in these little wooden guys were almost humorous.

But the little old guys were way more fun! The clever design of the Racer,
with its neck-and-neck race and it's single track. The surprising drop
right out of the Thunderbolt's station. Ahhh... I loved it.

Now, I begin to understand some of the discussions that I've seen here. I may
yet become a coaster aficionado.
--


 
 
 

Discovering older coasters... my first step

Post by Alan Jay Glueckma » Mon, 05 Sep 1994 19:53:54

Quote:

>Now, I begin to understand some of the discussions that I've seen here. I may
>yet become a coaster aficionado.

Welcome to the World of the Truly Obsessed...!

AJ -- Higher, Faster, Longer -- Glueckman

 
 
 

Discovering older coasters... my first step

Post by ELVIRA B. PIMEN » Wed, 07 Sep 1994 00:16:42


rites:
Quote:

>Folta) writes:

>>But last week, I finally visited Kennywood. The old coasters (The Racer,
>>The Thunderbolt) *really* impressed me. Those old designers had a lot of
>>imagination, and did a lot of cool things without the benefit of steel
>>terrors.

> Hey, welcome to the club! we're always glad to hear a "new" fan of
>traditional coasters. And you've got lots more to yet discover. The real
>key to finding the best ones is finding the traditional parks, like
>Kennywood. There are many in Pennsylvania... Do you have "Guide to Ride"
>from ACE? It lists all the coasters in North America with adresses and
>phone numbers. Start planning your trips for next summer!

   Dorney or Hershey would be a good place to start.
   Dorney has 2 wooden one from 1924 and a huge new one.
   Hershey- has a wooden older then dorney but only one wooden.

   Paul

 
 
 

Discovering older coasters... my first step

Post by Wayne Fol » Wed, 07 Sep 1994 06:03:43

Quote:
>... There are many in Pennsylvania... Do you have "Guide to Ride"
>from ACE? It lists all the coasters in North America with adresses and
>phone numbers. Start planning your trips for next summer!

Well [blush], I erm [blush] went so far as to get an ACE application once.
Something or other happened, and I never joined. Wasn't there a PostScript
version of the application online or something?

The unfortunate thing about traditional parks is that they don't seem to
be located in places that I'd otherwise want to vacation in. Maybe they could
move, say, Kenneywood lock-stock-n-coaster to the Rockies? Or New Mexico?

OTOH, I discovered that Pittsburgh is a pretty nice place. I had expected
Rust Belt, and was pleasantly surprised. The most insane road system that
I could imagine, but nice restaurants, educational opportunities, views, etc.

OTOOH, I couldn't believe that the main road to Kenneywood goes through
small-town backroads, complete with stop signs, potholes, cute little PA
houses. I can't really comprehend how they get anyone into that place!
--


 
 
 

Discovering older coasters... my first step

Post by Wayne Fol » Wed, 07 Sep 1994 06:07:58

Quote:
>   Dorney has 2 wooden one from 1924 and a huge new one.

Where's Dorney? I've never heard of it. (Are we basically saying here that
PA/Ohio are the center of gravity of the traditional coaster world?)

Quote:
>   Hershey- has a wooden older then dorney but only one wooden.

The Comet? I rode it a long time ago, and it seems that the second drop
(no lift) was as big as the first drop. When you're used to, say, the Rebel
Yell, with its one big drop then lots of little ones, that's cool.
--


 
 
 

Discovering older coasters... my first step

Post by ELVIRA B. PIMEN » Wed, 07 Sep 1994 09:57:49


es:

Quote:
>>   Dorney has 2 wooden one from 1924 and a huge new one.

>Where's Dorney? I've never heard of it. (Are we basically saying here that
>PA/Ohio are the center of gravity of the traditional coaster world?)

    PA and Ohio are the best places for roller coasters new and old. Small and
    big. Fast and Slow. Long and short.

    Well you get the Idea.

    Paul

 
 
 

Discovering older coasters... my first step

Post by Cyclone1 » Tue, 06 Sep 1994 16:57:03


Quote:
Folta) writes:
>But last week, I finally visited Kennywood. The old coasters (The Racer,
>The Thunderbolt) *really* impressed me. Those old designers had a lot of
>imagination, and did a lot of cool things without the benefit of steel
>terrors.

 Hey, welcome to the club! we're always glad to hear a "new" fan of
traditional coasters. And you've got lots more to yet discover. The real
key to finding the best ones is finding the traditional parks, like
Kennywood. There are many in Pennsylvania... Do you have "Guide to Ride"
from ACE? It lists all the coasters in North America with adresses and
phone numbers. Start planning your trips for next summer!
 
 
 

Discovering older coasters... my first step

Post by Joe Gill » Thu, 08 Sep 1994 02:33:05

Quote:

>But last week, I finally visited Kennywood. The old coasters (The Racer,
>The Thunderbolt) *really* impressed me. Those old designers had a lot of
>imagination, and did a lot of cool things without the benefit of steel
>terrors.

>I first rode the Steel Phantom, which had the expected terror factor, along
>with lots of loops  and rolls (I couldn't walk straight when I got off), and,
>of course, SPEED. After an 80-mph ride coming off of a huge lift, the lifts
>in these little wooden guys were almost humorous.

>But the little old guys were way more fun! The clever design of the Racer,
>with its neck-and-neck race and it's single track. The surprising drop
>right out of the Thunderbolt's station. Ahhh... I loved it.

>Now, I begin to understand some of the discussions that I've seen here. I may
>yet become a coaster aficionado.

Yes!  There is hope for the world.  My daughter, now 12, and I discovered
this, oh, about 4 years ago.  Since then we've gone to Conneaut Lake, PA,
to ride the Blue Streak (1933), Coney Island, to ride the Cyclone (1927),
Knoebel's Grove, PA, to ride the Phoenix (?), and Kennywood.  And our
home park is CP, where we have the Blue Streak and Magnum.  Yes, the Mag
is a steelie, but it's an out-and-back, and that's what makes it great.
Oh yeah, we also went to King's Island to ride the Racer.  In fact, here's
a cool tour - a John Allen tour:

Blue Streak at Cedar Point
Racer (Backwards) at King's Island
Cannonball at Lake Winnepesaukah, GA
The John Allen at Atlanta (the GASM?)
Starliner at Panama City, FL

And let's not forget the upstate New York ones:

Jackrabbit at Seabreeze, Rochester, NY
Comet at what's that place near Albany?

And that ain't just any ol' Comet either.  That's the legendary Crystal
Beach Comet.  You might throw the little New England parks in that New
York tour:  Lake Compounce, Canobie Lake.

Couple more Ohio classics we haven't mentioned:  the one at Geauga Lake
(don't recall the name right now), and the Screamin' Eagle at Americana,
a small park near King's Island.

If you're ever in Colorado check out the Twister and Wildcat(s), and in
California there are two Giant Dippers, under one of which they once
found a glass eye.

 
 
 

Discovering older coasters... my first step

Post by Eric Griswo » Thu, 08 Sep 1994 03:21:39

WF> I've ridden quite a few coasters and thought I had seen it all. King's
WF> Dominion, a couple of Bush Gardens, DisneyWorld, DisneyLand, Hershey Park,

[etc]

WF> But last week, I finally visited Kennywood. The old coasters (The Racer,
WF> The Thunderbolt) *really* impressed me. Those old designers had a lot of
WF> imagination, and did a lot of cool things without the benefit of steel
WF> terrors.

[...]

Reading this post just made my day.  There's some great technology in
coasters these days (mostly arriving thrice yearly from Switzerland),
but the REAL joy of rollercoasters is definitely in the low-tech
category.  It's always great when yet another person sees the light.

Eric Griswold