Braking on B&M's

Braking on B&M's

Post by Kris Hol » Tue, 24 Jun 1997 04:00:00


Hi fellow r.r-cer's---

I was wondering if B&M uses the fin brake on their coasters or do they
use something totally different?

Thanx,

Kris

 
 
 

Braking on B&M's

Post by SteelFor » Tue, 24 Jun 1997 04:00:00

the brakes work on the same basic principle of fin brakes but the fin on
the trains is wide and of course the brake is a little wider

   \               /                          
    I  I~~~~I  I       Sample
    I  I        I  I-------Brake   ( other coaster brakes are a thin piece
of metal passing      I  I FIN  I  I                  thru two similar
brakes like these but Pressing against       I  I        I  I            
     each other  )    
    I  I ____I  I
   /               \

Hope this helps!

SAM

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Braking on B&M's

Post by CROOOO » Wed, 25 Jun 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

> Hi fellow r.r-cer's---

> I was wondering if B&M uses the fin brake on their coasters or do they
> use something totally different?

From a purely visual point of view, they look the same.  Just bigger.

But what I want to know is, how come B&M Trim Breaks barely seem to
even kiss the train as it passes through, hardly slowing the beasts
down at all, meanwhile Arrow Trim Breaks seem to drop the speed
down anywhere between 50 - 75 percent of the entering speed.  

Other than the fact that B&M's are built better and kiss ass...
I don't even mind the Trim Breaks on the few coasters that they've
built that have them!  (Kumba & Montu for example...)

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Braking on B&M's

Post by BPB BE » Wed, 25 Jun 1997 04:00:00


writes:

Quote:

>> Hi fellow r.r-cer's---

>> I was wondering if B&M uses the fin brake on their coasters or do they
>> use something totally different?

>From a purely visual point of view, they look the same.  Just bigger.

>But what I want to know is, how come B&M Trim Breaks barely seem to
>even kiss the train as it passes through, hardly slowing the beasts
>down at all, meanwhile Arrow Trim Breaks seem to drop the speed
>down anywhere between 50 - 75 percent of the entering speed.  

>Other than the fact that B&M's are built better and kiss ass...
>I don't even mind the Trim Breaks on the few coasters that they've
>built that have them!  (Kumba & Montu for example...)

The main backbone of a B&M train is in effect the "fin" for which the
brake callipers clamp during t*** / braking.  The backbone (or spine)
also contains the chain dog and roll back dog.

Unlike Arrow / Vekoma brake units (essentially the same things), B&M
Brakes (virtually identical to Intamin's due to the fact that Intamin had
them first...) require air pressure to OPEN the brake callipers.  The
calliper cylinders are spring loaded so that they remain closed at all
times unless pneumatic pressure is applied to open them.  Arrow brakes
work in reverse. B&M brakes use brass brake shoes which make them more
efficient but at the same time slightly more expensive to replace...!

As for the t*** process at block brakes, B&M will design the track in
relation to a train passing through the block brakes uninterrupted, but at
the same time if a train was to be stopped and held in the block, it could
be later released to make the rest of the ride circuit unaided (all be it
a bit slower!).

As for Arrow, I was once told that they basically design a ride in
sections, so where there are block brakes they take it for granted that
the train coming from the brakes is running from a standing start (or a
velocity just above that), and so the following run of track is designed
respectively (cambers etc.).  Therefore an untrimmed train travelling at
speed through the block brakes will be travelling on track that has been
designed to suit a lower speed.  This could cause damage to the
passengers, trains and track so t*** is required to bring the train to
a suitable running speed.

In the case of several US park's I have been to it would seem that they
try and slow the trains wherever possible so the block brake's serve as an
ideal opportunity to do that (Viper, GASM etc. at the SF parks spring to
mind).  Why they do this is anybody's guess - surely Arrow couldn't have
got the track profiling that wrong to begin with.  But on second
thoughts.........

Greg P.

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