Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Karl Denning » Sun, 27 Aug 2000 11:33:01



Quote:

>I would like to add something to this thread that has worried me. I worked
>for a number of years as a building inspector and was on a team that studied
>the damage done by Andrew. In 1993 I built a house that exceeds all codes
>regarding wind loads, vertical steel/uplift and storm panels continuos
>lateral bracing, every structural element I could think of. When I received
>my insurance bill a couple of years ago I noticed my old company that I had
>been with since 19 years of age had changed it's name a little. Why? Was it
>to limit liability? I remembered a computer model of estimated damage it
>Andrew had struck 50 miles farther north and I think now I understand. In
>case of this occurring the "new company" with almost the same name could now
>cover perhaps 10% of the damage and the liability would be limited to them
>and not the old name company that originally insured me. So what have I
>done? In a category 4 storm I don't expect any damage of consequence greater
>than my deductible. In the event of a severe category 5 the insurance that I
>now carry would be worth very little. I realize that my carrier doesn't
>insure everyone, and I considered that in my evaluation. Having said all
>this first and foremost is the protection of life. During Floyd ( a
>hurricane on steroids) much of the east coast and central Florida were told
>to evacuate. The highways were jammed and those lucky enough to find a
>parking spot in walking distance of a rest stop had restrooms and water.
>Thousands of people spent the night in their cars parked along the
>interstates with less. If and only if you are not in an area prone to tidal
>surge then by all means consider steel panels for every window and door and
>a safe room.   Regards,    - Frank

That wouldn't be State Farm now, would it? :-)

Seriously, most of the big insurance companies did this after Andrew in
Florida.  The bottom line is that if you get severely wrecked by a really
big storm nowdays (and this is NOT limted to Florida - it applies to almost
all coastal areas) you had better pray to God the damage was flood-related
because that way you'll get paid (up to the limit of the flood insurance
anyway)

I have no faith that the insurance companies that did this won't turn
around and bankrupt the "division" they spun off in this instance.  No
faith whatsoever.  All the companies big enough to absorb a hit from a
monster Cat5 storm have done this, so it makes no difference who you
write with in that regard.

We're talking about a real monster here - a solid Cat 5.  Smaller hurricanes
won't trigger this event, because I suspect the insurance companies know this
is a "one shot" deal in any given state.  Do it once, lose operating
certification (and the business) forever.  As a consequence stiffing
homeowners isn't something they'll do lightly, but if there's a 100-mile-long
stretch of land from the coast 20 miles inland that is basically wiped clean
you bet your britches that they will.  There is no other explanation for
the "split-off" game they've all played in the last few years.

My current home was here during Opal, and the house itself was undamaged
despite NOAA claiming that there were 130-140mph winds right here (their
maps for wind velocity, not mine.)  Surge got close but didn't come inside.
That's a solid Cat 4 storm, by the way, if the wind velocities NOAA claims
are accurate.

The landscaping was totalled (salt water will do that) and the pool was full
of salt water and had to be drained and refilled (AFTER the waterlogged
ground dried out!  We don't want to pop the pool!)

But the house itself rode it through without trouble.

The former owners stayed home for it.

Storms like Floyd are aberrations.  When you got something that runs up the
coast like that without coming ashore you've got real trouble, in that
"rolling" evacuation orders just pile people on people.  In my case
(Panhandle) that really can't happen, since there's no peninsula for people
to pile up on.  This is one of the reasons, by the way, that I refused to
consider property on the Destin side (you think I want that low and little
spit of land being all there is between me and a monster?  No thanks.....)

I have inland routes out of here that get me to friends homes in Alabama on
high ground within 2 hours.  Provided that I am willing to go on some "false
alarms" I can button up and leave 24 hours in advance of potential arrival
without any trouble at all.  The roads won't have washed out 'cause the
rain won't be falling yet.  I have the luxury of being able to do that
and take the "risk" of having a nice visit instead of a storm evasion
meneuver if it turns and misses us.

If it looks to be a Cat 3 or less, we'll just button up and stay home.

If its a monster both we and the boat are putting up the shutters, shutting
down, and leaving.

--
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Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Waterlo » Sun, 27 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:
>>I am not an expert, but based on what happened in Alaska and Chile I

would think it is possible that both would happen within an hour of each
other. In both cases people noticed that there was no water in the bay,
then the tidal waves came crashing in.<<

If that happens in Baltimore, both my home and my boat are goners.

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Stephen Kin » Sun, 27 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Well said Steve!


Quote:
> I just know that I should stay about of this, but I've lived here way too
> long....

> I've lived here most of my life, my house and boat prep take about 8 - 12
> hours.  If you do it in a 'few hours' you don't have many windows or much
> outside...  I have 48' of sliding glass doors that get metal shutters,
just
> getting the shutters from the garage and installing them on these doors
> takes over 2 hours, then I have to do the rst of the house, get the patio
> furniture inside, etc...  I know how the drill goes, since you have not
yet
> been though a storm, do you?  Have you completely sealed up the house,
> brought in the furniture, potted plants, etc...or have you put up a few
> shutters and estimated the rest?  If you have roll down shutters, it could
> take only a few hours, I can't (won't) afford $15k for Rolladen Shutters.

> Nope, just wrong.  The last mandatory evac range ends about 1 mile west of
> here, they don't evac everybody for anything, no place to put that many
> folks.  We won't get ordered ou unless it's a Cat 4/5 expected at high
> tide, we're 2.25 miles inland, surrounded by drainage canals, and 13.5
feet
> up (practically on a nountain for S. FL :-)

> You just don't get it, I've been here for this stuff.  I can tell you that
> my boat tied to it's trailer with 700 lbs of fuel (3500 lbs total weight),
> would be covered if it got blown away.

> Yup I have shutters...  Getting out may be MORE idiotic, have you ever
seen
> I-95 when all the folks that freak-out are doing just what you suggest?
> They are backed up for 100+ miles, and sitting on the road waiting to get
> creamed, there are NO HOTEL ROOMS available, so you can sleep in your car
> (unless you made reservations BEFORE the hurricane warning went up).

> I came home from work travel in NC just before Andrew,  If you would have
> left 18 hrs before the storm, you might have spent the whole time in
> traffic (saw the backup from the last Southbound Delta flight into PBI),
if
> the storm whould have hit where it had been predicted to go, several
> thousand might have died on the road...

> And help create the mess on the road.  If I am told to evac, I will leave
> as instructed. If I am not told to evac, I will stay out of everyone's
way.

> I like my boat too, but I value my life, my wife's life, our cats' lives
> and the lives of the folks who are supposed to be on the roads evacuating.
> Follow the rules, the plans are for the community, not the individual.

> Karl, face it, I have read all the repsonses and no one has agreed with
> you, you are out numbered by folks with real experience in hurricanes.

> You are right in that I should anchor my trailer, and I will IF I can (in
> the way that Pete suggested).  But so what if I do?  Not everyone will and
> my boat will just end up as the base of the pile :-)  My boat may become a
> hurricane casualty, OK, so it may happen.  If I had a concrete bunker to
> put it in, I'd let the dummies down the block with no shutters use it and
> the boat would probably still stay outside.  It's mine, but it's just a
> hunk of fiberglass and aluminum.

> If you live in FL, you have to learn to live with forces bigger than
> yourself.  Don't think that you can skip out at each threat and come back
> when the coast is clear, it won't happen.  We do our best and deal with
it.
> If you don't like hurricanes, try California, we will get hurricanes here
> until we get another lull in about 20 years.  And you can't outrun mother
> nature :-)

> Peace, it's happy hour time, bye...

> Steve

> >--


 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Karl Denning » Sun, 27 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

>Well said Steve!



>> I just know that I should stay about of this, but I've lived here way too
>> long....

>> I've lived here most of my life, my house and boat prep take about 8 - 12
>> hours.  If you do it in a 'few hours' you don't have many windows or much
>> outside...  I have 48' of sliding glass doors that get metal shutters,
>just
>> getting the shutters from the garage and installing them on these doors
>> takes over 2 hours, then I have to do the rst of the house, get the patio
>> furniture inside, etc...  I know how the drill goes, since you have not
>yet
>> been though a storm, do you?  Have you completely sealed up the house,
>> brought in the furniture, potted plants, etc...or have you put up a few
>> shutters and estimated the rest?  If you have roll down shutters, it could
>> take only a few hours, I can't (won't) afford $15k for Rolladen Shutters.

I've done the ENTIRE drill, top to bottom, to measure the time required as
well as the preparations and any special considerations (like things that
won't fit where I'd like to put them.)

No problem.

I was *very* interested in the time requirement for the simple reason that
I want to know (1) that there isn't anything "missing" that I should have
here, and (2) I want to know how long it will take from the time I decide
to go until I can actually depart.

My entire Lanai seals up behind the shutters; that's where virtually all of
the exposed glass is, and its a HUGE area.  All my outdoorsey stuff goes in
there and gets sealed in.   The rest of the significant glass area is on
that same face (the tracks for the rest I leave up; the lanai bottom track
obviously has to come out when not being used so it doesn't wreck your feet)

If its a REAL storm then I have to give consideration to whether to cut or
not the lanai screens.  I have conflicting answers on that from so-called
experts - some say do it (the structure is where all the money is) and some
say don't (if its going to fail, the screening won't be the cause)  Actually
slitting them requires a few extra minutes (obviously I haven't done THAT
step yet)

I intentionally do not keep much outdoors where its in harm's way.  There's
a gazebo near the water that may get wrecked; there's nothing I can do about
it.  Its anchored, and it survived Opal and Georges (despite being bashed by
driftwood) but there are no promises it won't be kindling in the next one.

My *boat* itself requires no actual prep.  Its in the garage all the time; I
never store outdoors or in a storage yard.  If I'm going to stay then it
stays where it is.  If I'm leaving then hooking it up requires less than 5
minutes singlehanded.

If I had a boat a slip or lots of stuff (like a play gym) outdoors that was
not normally sheltered anyway then I'd have a much bigger job.

I can be out of here in 6 hours from the time I decide to go without
breaking a sweat.

--
--

http://www.denninger.net    Cost-effective solutions on the Internet
http://childrens-justice.org    Working to protect children's rights

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Waterlo » Mon, 28 Aug 2000 15:45:09

Why is somebody who's never actually been through a hurricane trying to
contradict people who have?
 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by CoolTeach2 » Tue, 29 Aug 2000 15:15:43

Quote:
>Why is somebody who's never actually been through a hurricane trying to
>contradict people who have?

WaterLou.....this type of person does have a formal classification, and I'll
thank you to use it in the future!!

This type of person is known formally as a "Statistic"...the very type of
person who causes insurance rates to be higher than necessary...and who is seen
on the local news trying to describe what the storm sounded like!!

;-)

Dave.......14-foot-long piece of 'glass, plywood, steel, bird residue, etc.
shaped like a Cobia Sprint and looking better every day!!!

<The right to swing your***ends where the other man's nose
begins....T.Roosevelt>

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Steph » Tue, 29 Aug 2000 15:41:57

Quote:
>Why is somebody who's never actually been through a hurricane trying to
>contradict people who have?

Partially, because we were originally thinking that he lives /in/ Florida (the
peninsula). If state boundaries were based more on Geography and less on
politics (like that part of Michigan that should really be Wisconsin), he'd be
living in LA (Lower Alabama). If I drew the maps, Alabama would be on the Gulf
all the way over to Apalachicola.
__________________
Stephen
http://stephen.fathom.org
Satellite Hunting 2.0.2 (Y2K compliant!) visible satellite pass prediction
shareware available for download at
http://stephen.fathom.org/sathunt.html
 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Waterlo » Tue, 29 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:
>>If state boundaries were based more on Geography and less on

politics (like that part of Michigan that should really be Wisconsin), he'd be
living in LA (Lower Alabama).<< - Stephen

Uh oh.  That opens up all kinds of possible suggestions.

Poor Maryland.  It would lose its western extension to West ***ia, and
there'd be a heck of a battle over whether Delaware gets Maryland's Eastern
Shore or Maryland absorbs Delaware.  AND (horrible thought), the District of
Columbia would be ceded back to Maryland - something that's been suggested
already and ***ly opposed by us Marylanders.