Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Karl Denning » Sat, 26 Aug 2000 04:00:00



Quote:

>Karl - how many times have you put your hurricane shutters up? How long did
>it take you to put them up?

A couple of hours.  No big deal.  If you don't like the time requirement you
can buy "roll downs" that can be secured in a few minutes.  I "test drove"
the preparations because I want to know what it will take.  Now I know.
(There's more to it than just the shutters with my home due to the lanai,
pool, computers, backups, etc - all require some prep, but with proper
planning I can be ready to leave in under 3 hours from the start of my
efforts IF I do things in the right order.)

Metal "corrugated" shutters, which is what I have, don't take long to put
up at all.

Now *PLYWOOD* takes quite a bit longer, especially if you haven't done it
before and don't have the panels marked and pre-drilled!  It takes even
LONGER if the store is out of plywood because you didn't prepare!

Who's fault is THAT if you're not prepared?

Quote:
>At my office, I am also responsible for ensuring
>that all data on 4 servers and two midrange systems are backed up. (Yes we
>do incrementals every night and full system saves every month). Prior to a
>storm, I am responsible for doing a full system save on all six systems,
>ensuring that all PC's/phones are packed away and covered. I also have the
>responsibility of my house to attend to. None of this starts until a
>hurricane watch is set. A watch is usually set 24 - 48 hours out. Now - as I
>live in South Florida - where do you suggest that I go? Orlando? Hmmm.... we
>had a hurricane that was supposed to hit Ft. Lauderdale last year and it
>turned north and went across the state near Orlando. No dice. 200 - 300
>miles away. The keys? Right. How about Ft. Meyers. You ever tried to drive
>across Alligator alley the day before a storm? Good luck!

>Most places here are only evacuated within a few miles of the coast. These
>would be (in my area) anything east of I-95. Why? We have a lot of people
>and only a few ways out. I-95, Fl. Turnpike and I-75. What do you think
>would happen if all of the residents of the Keys, Miami and Ft. Lauderdale
>tried to evac at the same time? You'd never clear the roads in time.

>I have lived near where you do. If I remember right, you live on the Gulf
>Coast. Evacuating is easier there because you have 1. Less people and 2.
>more escape routes.

True.

BUT, there is a difference between taking reasonable precautions and taking
NONE AT ALL.

Having a trailerable boat and no means to secure it from storms (whether
that means running or SECURING it) is idiotic.  You're begging to have it
destroyed WHEN (not if) a storm comes.

Either have HARD anchors in the ground (well away from surge and flooding
risk) that can take the stress, and anchor the trailer and boat combination
to THAT, have a hardened place to STORE said boat during these blows, or
get the boat the hell out of there before the storm hits.

Abandoning property with ZERO preparation, which is what this guy was
talking about doing, ought to get you a nice "no thanks" from your
insurance company after the first loss.

Better check your policy if you plan to do that.  "All risk" doesn't mean
that you can ignore a KNOWN risk and do nothing to mitigate the damage,
then expect the insurance company to pay off and keep you as a customer.

--
--

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Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Stephen Kin » Sat, 26 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Yep - you are right about the roll downs. I have corrugated also. Did you
remember to pack your insurance policy, meds, and other important items?

I have lived in Hurricane zones for the past 11 years (Charleston, VA Beach,
Pascagoula - near Biloxi MS and now Boynton Beach Florida - near West Palm).
I have also been involved in cleanup efforts after Hugo (while stationed in
Charleston) and Andrew. I have seen what these storms can do.

My boat is in  rack storage and I do not own a trailer. My insurance company
knows this and my policy includes hurricane insurance. In my case evacuating
with my boat is not an option. Even so - most of the tracks are inaccurate
and off by hundreds of miles at best. If you remember, Debby was supposed to
hit Miami. At best - you have 24 hours notice and even then, you can't be
guaranteed where it will hit. The *worst* place to be is on the road. How do
you think your insurance company will like it if the hurricane hits you
while you are driving across US90, I-10 or some other such road with your
boat attached and it gets destroyed? If you can't get out in a timely
manner, don't go.


Quote:


> >Karl - how many times have you put your hurricane shutters up? How long
did
> >it take you to put them up?

> A couple of hours.  No big deal.  If you don't like the time requirement
you
> can buy "roll downs" that can be secured in a few minutes.  I "test drove"
> the preparations because I want to know what it will take.  Now I know.
> (There's more to it than just the shutters with my home due to the lanai,
> pool, computers, backups, etc - all require some prep, but with proper
> planning I can be ready to leave in under 3 hours from the start of my
> efforts IF I do things in the right order.)

> Metal "corrugated" shutters, which is what I have, don't take long to put
> up at all.

> Now *PLYWOOD* takes quite a bit longer, especially if you haven't done it
> before and don't have the panels marked and pre-drilled!  It takes even
> LONGER if the store is out of plywood because you didn't prepare!

> Who's fault is THAT if you're not prepared?

> >At my office, I am also responsible for ensuring
> >that all data on 4 servers and two midrange systems are backed up. (Yes
we
> >do incrementals every night and full system saves every month). Prior to
a
> >storm, I am responsible for doing a full system save on all six systems,
> >ensuring that all PC's/phones are packed away and covered. I also have
the
> >responsibility of my house to attend to. None of this starts until a
> >hurricane watch is set. A watch is usually set 24 - 48 hours out. Now -
as I
> >live in South Florida - where do you suggest that I go? Orlando? Hmmm....
we
> >had a hurricane that was supposed to hit Ft. Lauderdale last year and it
> >turned north and went across the state near Orlando. No dice. 200 - 300
> >miles away. The keys? Right. How about Ft. Meyers. You ever tried to
drive
> >across Alligator alley the day before a storm? Good luck!

> >Most places here are only evacuated within a few miles of the coast.
These
> >would be (in my area) anything east of I-95. Why? We have a lot of people
> >and only a few ways out. I-95, Fl. Turnpike and I-75. What do you think
> >would happen if all of the residents of the Keys, Miami and Ft.
Lauderdale
> >tried to evac at the same time? You'd never clear the roads in time.

> >I have lived near where you do. If I remember right, you live on the Gulf
> >Coast. Evacuating is easier there because you have 1. Less people and 2.
> >more escape routes.

> True.

> BUT, there is a difference between taking reasonable precautions and
taking
> NONE AT ALL.

> Having a trailerable boat and no means to secure it from storms (whether
> that means running or SECURING it) is idiotic.  You're begging to have it
> destroyed WHEN (not if) a storm comes.

> Either have HARD anchors in the ground (well away from surge and flooding
> risk) that can take the stress, and anchor the trailer and boat
combination
> to THAT, have a hardened place to STORE said boat during these blows, or
> get the boat the hell out of there before the storm hits.

> Abandoning property with ZERO preparation, which is what this guy was
> talking about doing, ought to get you a nice "no thanks" from your
> insurance company after the first loss.

> Better check your policy if you plan to do that.  "All risk" doesn't mean
> that you can ignore a KNOWN risk and do nothing to mitigate the damage,
> then expect the insurance company to pay off and keep you as a customer.

> --
> --

Activist
> http://www.denninger.net Cost-effective solutions on the Internet
> http://childrens-justice.org Working to protect children's rights


 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Karl Denning » Sat, 26 Aug 2000 04:00:00



Quote:




>> >> Staying at home when a BIG storm is coming is idiotic.  You prep the house
>> >> and get the hell out.  You *DO* have shutters and such, right?

>> >> If you stay at home in a truly big blow you're asking to be a human
>> >> casualty when the house is damaged or worse.  Prep the house, lock it down,
>> >> hook the boat up and get the hell out of there.

>> >Karl,

>> >This is one subject you know absolutely _nothing_ about. Your advice
>> >will get people killed.

>> >If you live in a tidal flood zone, sell your house and move somewhere
>> >sensible. In that new house have a "safe room" in the center of the
>> >house with no windows. Stay in there covered with mattresses until after
>> >the storm has passed.

>> >Do -not- try to outrun a storm in an automobile.

>> Gee, that's why they evacuate coastal areas, right?

>> Because people get killed when they take that advice?

>So you live in a coastal flooding area? (That is absolutely one of the
>stupidest things one can choose to do in America if you care about your
>possesions or your life.)

Yeah, yeah, yeah.  My "lowest floor" elevation is above the 100 year flood
level.  No "special" flood rating; the elevation cert says zone "X"
(minimal risk, exactly the same as an INLAND location)

Could it flood?  Sure.  And?  Anything CAN flood if you get the right
conditions.  (The point is that the last big blow around here, Opal, which
brought Cat 4 winds and a real surge to this location, didn't flood the
house.)

Quote:
>I then assume that your bottom floor of the living area is some 10'-20'
>above high tide? You are far safer in the safe room of that properly
>stilted house than on the road when the storm hits.

I'm above the 100 year flood level, and I'm not directly on the coast -
something I'd never do (but I am directly on the bay, which can and does
get wind-driven surges - just not as bad as open ocean exposure does.)

Those "stilted" houses are even worse, in that the entire level below
(usually the garage) is sacrificial and intended to blow out when they get
flooded.  

Exactly where did you say you intended to keep your car (and boat) during
that storm, and exactly how did you intend to get BACK to your (supposedly
safe) house once you move them to higher ground?

No thanks.

If I judge the expected surge risk to be enough to flood me ANYWAY despite
my elevation, then we leave and take the boat with us.  If not, then we
don't and the boat stays safely inside.  And no, I don't have to evac along
I-10; I not only know the other roads around here but also have a "safe
harbor" site a couple of hours inland.  Yeah, it'll take a lot longer to
get to if there's a storm coming than usual, but I'm quite capable of
deducing that its time to head inland long before they start issuing
mandatory evac orders.

--
--

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Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Michael J Port » Sat, 26 Aug 2000 04:00:00


=>If you stay at home in a truly big blow you're asking to be a human
=>casualty when the house is damaged or worse.  Prep the house, lock it down,
=>hook the boat up and get the hell out of there.

If I had to evacuate from somewhere, about the last thing I would
do is tow a boat behind my truck.  Tow a boat down a crammed road?
I don't think so...

Mike
--
-

PGP Fingerprint: F4 AE E1 9F 67 F7 DA EA  2F D2 37 F3 99 ED D1 C2

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Karl Denning » Sat, 26 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

>Yep - you are right about the roll downs. I have corrugated also. Did you
>remember to pack your insurance policy, meds, and other important items?

Yep.

Quote:
>I have lived in Hurricane zones for the past 11 years (Charleston, VA Beach,
>Pascagoula - near Biloxi MS and now Boynton Beach Florida - near West Palm).
>I have also been involved in cleanup efforts after Hugo (while stationed in
>Charleston) and Andrew. I have seen what these storms can do.

>My boat is in  rack storage and I do not own a trailer. My insurance company
>knows this and my policy includes hurricane insurance. In my case evacuating
>with my boat is not an option. Even so - most of the tracks are inaccurate
>and off by hundreds of miles at best. If you remember, Debby was supposed to
>hit Miami. At best - you have 24 hours notice and even then, you can't be
>guaranteed where it will hit. The *worst* place to be is on the road. How do
>you think your insurance company will like it if the hurricane hits you
>while you are driving across US90, I-10 or some other such road with your
>boat attached and it gets destroyed? If you can't get out in a timely
>manner, don't go.

Well, I CAN get out in a timely manner, and I WILL if I judge the risk of
a hit that's worth leaving for to be significant.  

If we can't safely stay, then we're leaving.  WITH the boat, and in plenty
of time.  If I'm wrong and we get missed then I lose a day.

So what.

I prefer to stay if possible.  The boat fits in the garage and so does the
car, and the doors are reinforced and face in a direction that provides
decent protection to begin with.  Shutters go up, various prep steps are
taken for things like the pool and lanai, sandbags (which I already have,
filled) get put on the wood landscaping elements (which may or may not do
anything, but heh, its better than a guaranteed loss of ALL of them) and
the house systems are prepped.

If its a Cat 4 or 5 coming we leave.  If its a 1 or 2 I don't care and we'll
have a party; there's no risk of serious damage to property or people.  If
its a 3 we have a judgement call to make and the direction of the impending
hit has a lot to do with it.

I understand the issue with those who do not own a trailer (or have a boat
that can't BE trailered.)  If I was in a slip I'd want a good place to
secure the boat, or pre-made arrangements to get it on a cradle on the
hard BEFORE the storm comes.

Fortunately around here such "good places" aren't all that hard to come
by for a larger boat, and for a smaller one, IF you know your way around
you can get out in plenty of time without having to use the Interstates.

But a TRAILERED boat either has to be gotten OFF the trailer or the trailer
and boat have to be secured REAL WELL to the GROUND before the storm gets
there.  A boat in dry storage or a boat on a trailer that is not secured to
the ground is basically an insurance claim in anything worse than a Cat 1
or a weak 2.  Dry storage buildings are tall, typically made out of nothing
more than corrugated metal and have a shitload of mass (the boats in them!)
with lots of windage way up high.  

They're going to get FLATTENED in a real blow.

--
--

http://www.denninger.net    Cost-effective solutions on the Internet
http://childrens-justice.org    Working to protect children's rights

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by hkra.. » Sat, 26 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:

> If I judge the expected surge risk to be enough to flood me ANYWAY despite
> my elevation, then we leave and take the boat with us.  If not, then we
> don't and the boat stays safely inside.  And no, I don't have to evac along
> I-10; I not only know the other roads around here but also have a "safe
> harbor" site a couple of hours inland.  Yeah, it'll take a lot longer to
> get to if there's a storm coming than usual, but I'm quite capable of
> deducing that its time to head inland long before they start issuing
> mandatory evac orders.

Hehhehehe. The confidence of an inlander. Your back roads will be under
water.

--
Harry Krause
------------

FOR SALE: 1 set of morals, never used, will sell cheap

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by David Smalle » Sat, 26 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:


> > If I judge the expected surge risk to be enough to flood me ANYWAY despite
> > my elevation, then we leave and take the boat with us.  If not, then we
> > don't and the boat stays safely inside.  And no, I don't have to evac along
> > I-10; I not only know the other roads around here but also have a "safe
> > harbor" site a couple of hours inland.  Yeah, it'll take a lot longer to
> > get to if there's a storm coming than usual, but I'm quite capable of
> > deducing that its time to head inland long before they start issuing
> > mandatory evac orders.

> Hehhehehe. The confidence of an inlander. Your back roads will be under
> water.

Ding.

--
DAVe & Skoshi, '69 Stamas 26'
http://personal.mia.bellsouth.net/mia/d/r/drsi/

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Karl Denning » Sat, 26 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:


>> If I judge the expected surge risk to be enough to flood me ANYWAY despite
>> my elevation, then we leave and take the boat with us.  If not, then we
>> don't and the boat stays safely inside.  And no, I don't have to evac along
>> I-10; I not only know the other roads around here but also have a "safe
>> harbor" site a couple of hours inland.  Yeah, it'll take a lot longer to
>> get to if there's a storm coming than usual, but I'm quite capable of
>> deducing that its time to head inland long before they start issuing
>> mandatory evac orders.

>Hehhehehe. The confidence of an inlander. Your back roads will be under
>water.

Nope.  There you are simply wrong.

--
--

http://www.denninger.net    Cost-effective solutions on the Internet
http://childrens-justice.org    Working to protect children's rights

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by hkra.. » Sat, 26 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:



> >> If I judge the expected surge risk to be enough to flood me ANYWAY despite
> >> my elevation, then we leave and take the boat with us.  If not, then we
> >> don't and the boat stays safely inside.  And no, I don't have to evac along
> >> I-10; I not only know the other roads around here but also have a "safe
> >> harbor" site a couple of hours inland.  Yeah, it'll take a lot longer to
> >> get to if there's a storm coming than usual, but I'm quite capable of
> >> deducing that its time to head inland long before they start issuing
> >> mandatory evac orders.

> >Hehhehehe. The confidence of an inlander. Your back roads will be under
> >water.

> Nope.  There you are simply wrong.

Hey, it's OK with me, Karl. I lived in Florida for about 80 months, and
you've lived there for two. I also know a little about the area where
you live...it's an area of the state where not a lot of money is spent
on first class roads, drainage and storm control.

--
Harry Krause
------------

If you play satanic music backwards, do you get hymns?

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Steve Weinga » Sat, 26 Aug 2000 04:00:00



I just know that I should stay about of this, but I've lived here way too
long....

Quote:

>Prepping the house is not that big of a deal IF you do it in advance.
>If you live in this part of the country where such storms are a known
>risk, then not doing so is idiotic.

I've lived here most of my life, my house and boat prep take about 8 - 12
hours.  If you do it in a 'few hours' you don't have many windows or much
outside...  I have 48' of sliding glass doors that get metal shutters, just
getting the shutters from the garage and installing them on these doors
takes over 2 hours, then I have to do the rst of the house, get the patio
furniture inside, etc...  I know how the drill goes, since you have not yet
been though a storm, do you?  Have you completely sealed up the house,
brought in the furniture, potted plants, etc...or have you put up a few
shutters and estimated the rest?  If you have roll down shutters, it could
take only a few hours, I can't (won't) afford $15k for Rolladen Shutters.

Quote:

>If a BIG storm is coming, they're going to order you out anyway.  Your
>insurance company knows this and its factored into your premiums.

Nope, just wrong.  The last mandatory evac range ends about 1 mile west of
here, they don't evac everybody for anything, no place to put that many
folks.  We won't get ordered ou unless it's a Cat 4/5 expected at high
tide, we're 2.25 miles inland, surrounded by drainage canals, and 13.5 feet
up (practically on a nountain for S. FL :-)

Quote:

>Virtually ALL insurance policies have a clause in them that says you
>must take all reasonable steps to prevent damage, or they won't pay for
>the part of the damage that a prudent person would have avoided (but you
>didn't.)

You just don't get it, I've been here for this stuff.  I can tell you that
my boat tied to it's trailer with 700 lbs of fuel (3500 lbs total weight),
would be covered if it got blown away.

Quote:

>>Lastly, I'm sure glad that my insurance company doesn't think that
>>staying home during a hurricane, and not taking my boat to wherever to
>>be safe for the boat, is considered intentionally putting my assets at
>>risk.  That's why they set the rates as they do.  They *EXPECT* that
>>the boat will stay on the trailer, in the trailer yard, that's how the
>>policy reads.

>Staying at home when a BIG storm is coming is idiotic.  You prep the
>house and get the hell out.  You *DO* have shutters and such, right?

Yup I have shutters...  Getting out may be MORE idiotic, have you ever seen
I-95 when all the folks that freak-out are doing just what you suggest?  
They are backed up for 100+ miles, and sitting on the road waiting to get
creamed, there are NO HOTEL ROOMS available, so you can sleep in your car
(unless you made reservations BEFORE the hurricane warning went up).

I came home from work travel in NC just before Andrew,  If you would have
left 18 hrs before the storm, you might have spent the whole time in
traffic (saw the backup from the last Southbound Delta flight into PBI), if
the storm whould have hit where it had been predicted to go, several
thousand might have died on the road...

Quote:

>If you stay at home in a truly big blow you're asking to be a human
>casualty when the house is damaged or worse.  Prep the house, lock it
>down, hook the boat up and get the hell out of there.

And help create the mess on the road.  If I am told to evac, I will leave
as instructed. If I am not told to evac, I will stay out of everyone's way.

Quote:

>>I think that you're off-base here...(and I get the impression that you
>>haven't lived in the hurricane belt during the last several years of
>>increasing storm activity, that or you have loads of money and time to
>>burn).  They reality is that you pay up the insurance, do what you can,
>>then duck and hang on.

>>Steve

>I like my boat and prefer that it be something other than hurricane
>fodder.

I like my boat too, but I value my life, my wife's life, our cats' lives
and the lives of the folks who are supposed to be on the roads evacuating.  
Follow the rules, the plans are for the community, not the individual.

Karl, face it, I have read all the repsonses and no one has agreed with
you, you are out numbered by folks with real experience in hurricanes.

You are right in that I should anchor my trailer, and I will IF I can (in
the way that Pete suggested).  But so what if I do?  Not everyone will and
my boat will just end up as the base of the pile :-)  My boat may become a
hurricane casualty, OK, so it may happen.  If I had a concrete bunker to
put it in, I'd let the dummies down the block with no shutters use it and
the boat would probably still stay outside.  It's mine, but it's just a
hunk of fiberglass and aluminum.

If you live in FL, you have to learn to live with forces bigger than
yourself.  Don't think that you can skip out at each threat and come back
when the coast is clear, it won't happen.  We do our best and deal with it.  
If you don't like hurricanes, try California, we will get hurricanes here
until we get another lull in about 20 years.  And you can't outrun mother
nature :-)

Peace, it's happy hour time, bye...

Steve

Quote:

>--

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Waterlo » Sat, 26 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Are any of you Florida hurricane experts able to theorize about what would
happen if a hurricane ever headed straight up the Chesapeake Bay?  Would it
suck the water out of the Baltimore harbor, or would it flood us?

I ask because I live about 20 feet from the seawall.  Another 4 feet of water
and it will be over the top.

About 7 feet more and the floating slips would be over the tops of the pilings.

Should I worry?

P.S.  I've only been here 6 years and nothing has happened yet, so I'm
clueless.

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by hkra.. » Sat, 26 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:

> Are any of you Florida hurricane experts able to theorize about what would
> happen if a hurricane ever headed straight up the Chesapeake Bay?  Would it
> suck the water out of the Baltimore harbor, or would it flood us?

> I ask because I live about 20 feet from the seawall.  Another 4 feet of water
> and it will be over the top.

> About 7 feet more and the floating slips would be over the tops of the pilings.

> Should I worry?

> P.S.  I've only been here 6 years and nothing has happened yet, so I'm
> clueless.

You'd probably have a tidal surge, and the winds might push the chop up
to interesting levels. If the 'cane hit the harbor itself, a lot of
boats would be detached from their moorings and would be visiting other
marinas and perhaps some of the better restaurants.

--
Harry Krause
------------

Expect the quest to break your heart at least once

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by David Smalle » Sat, 26 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:

> Are any of you Florida hurricane experts able to theorize about what would
> happen if a hurricane ever headed straight up the Chesapeake Bay?  Would it
> suck the water out of the Baltimore harbor, or would it flood us?

I am not an expert, but based on what happened in Alaska and Chile I
would think it is possible that both would happen within an hour of each
other. In both cases people noticed that there was no water in the bay,
then the tidal waves came crashing in.

If you want to read about true horror read about Chile in May of 1960.

Quote:
> I ask because I live about 20 feet from the seawall.  Another 4 feet of water
> and it will be over the top.

> About 7 feet more and the floating slips would be over the tops of the pilings.

> Should I worry?

No not really.

Quote:
> P.S.  I've only been here 6 years and nothing has happened yet, so I'm
> clueless.

I would call the Army Corps or Engineers and ask them.

--
DAVe & Skoshi, '69 Stamas 26'
http://personal.mia.bellsouth.net/mia/d/r/drsi/

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by <sfk.. » Sat, 26 Aug 2000 04:00:00

I would like to add something to this thread that has worried me. I worked
for a number of years as a building inspector and was on a team that studied
the damage done by Andrew. In 1993 I built a house that exceeds all codes
regarding wind loads, vertical steel/uplift and storm panels continuos
lateral bracing, every structural element I could think of. When I received
my insurance bill a couple of years ago I noticed my old company that I had
been with since 19 years of age had changed it's name a little. Why? Was it
to limit liability? I remembered a computer model of estimated damage it
Andrew had struck 50 miles farther north and I think now I understand. In
case of this occurring the "new company" with almost the same name could now
cover perhaps 10% of the damage and the liability would be limited to them
and not the old name company that originally insured me. So what have I
done? In a category 4 storm I don't expect any damage of consequence greater
than my deductible. In the event of a severe category 5 the insurance that I
now carry would be worth very little. I realize that my carrier doesn't
insure everyone, and I considered that in my evaluation. Having said all
this first and foremost is the protection of life. During Floyd ( a
hurricane on steroids) much of the east coast and central Florida were told
to evacuate. The highways were jammed and those lucky enough to find a
parking spot in walking distance of a rest stop had restrooms and water.
Thousands of people spent the night in their cars parked along the
interstates with less. If and only if you are not in an area prone to tidal
surge then by all means consider steel panels for every window and door and
a safe room.   Regards,    - Frank
 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Steph » Sun, 27 Aug 2000 09:39:47

Quote:
>Are any of you Florida hurricane experts able to theorize about what would
>happen if a hurricane ever headed straight up the Chesapeake Bay?  Would it
>suck the water out of the Baltimore harbor, or would it flood us?

>I ask because I live about 20 feet from the seawall.  Another 4 feet of water
>and it will be over the top.

This may be a southeastern thing, but around here, every TV news has a Storm
Tracker Map [tm]. You can find them in grocery stores, at fast food joints and
etc. They usually include a coastal map with flood zones predicted and color
coded by how much water it would take to sink them.
__________________
Stephen
http://stephen.fathom.org
Satellite Hunting 2.0.2 (Y2K compliant!) visible satellite pass prediction
shareware available for download at
http://stephen.fathom.org/sathunt.html