Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by hkra.. » Fri, 25 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

> Heh, if you'd prefer to risk having your boat wrecked, be my guest.

> If you want my opinion anyone who has a trailerable vessel (and vehicle to
> tow it) and doesn't depart in advance, assuming enough notice is given,
> should be unable to get insurance on a subsequent vessel if theirs is
> destroyed.

> Intentionally placing your assets at risk and then asking an insurance
> company to cover an *avoidable* incident should make you uninsurable.

Fortunately for those of us who are human, have foibles and are far less
perfect in every way than Karl, he isn't in charge of anything.

--
Harry Krause
------------

If you can keep your head when all about you are losing theirs, you must
be at least a foot shorter than them.

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Stephen Kin » Fri, 25 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Karl - if I remember right you just recently moved to our great state
(Florida). Let me ask you - have you ever been through a hurricane before? 9
times out of 10 the track is incorrect and misses the original forecast
point by many miles. So - if I move my boat 200 - 300 miles away (BTW -
where do I leave it?) and the storm hits the location where I parked my
boat, you're proposing that I can no longer obtain insurance?

BTW - I've been through Hugo and Andrew.


Quote:
> Heh, if you'd prefer to risk having your boat wrecked, be my guest.

> If you want my opinion anyone who has a trailerable vessel (and vehicle to
> tow it) and doesn't depart in advance, assuming enough notice is given,
> should be unable to get insurance on a subsequent vessel if theirs is
> destroyed.

> Intentionally placing your assets at risk and then asking an insurance
> company to cover an *avoidable* incident should make you uninsurable.

> --
> --

Activist
> http://www.denninger.net Cost-effective solutions on the Internet
> http://childrens-justice.org Working to protect children's rights



> >You must be kidding!   And miss the hurricane party?  No way!



> >>Then hook it up and leave WELL in advance of the storm!

> >>--


 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Peter W. Mee » Sat, 26 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Quote:
>...tie the boat well to the trailer, and maybe tie the trailer down with sand
>screws (but not an option where I am, since the ground is 6" of packed
>crushed roof tile...)

(Hi, Steve; long time no see)

You might find it worth while to set four of the "sand
screws", digging away the crushed tile and re-packing
it after. Then they would be available for tieing your
boat down in the future at short notice. There's lots
more letters after "D", after all. A 4" ground anchor
has 3-4000 pounds pull-out in "average soil", and they
are available up to 6 or 8 inches, at least. I set six
4" anchors to tie down a construction shed and hooked
them with wire rope to the rafter purlins. The engineer
says that is about twice the likely lift of the roof
(14' by 40') in 100 MPH straight-line winds. It took
me about 3 hours by myself (with a power auger to drive
the screws). It would depend on whether your trailer lot
owner will let you make leasehold improvements (you would
have to leave the anchors if you left) and whether you
always get the same location when you park it.

--
  --Pete

rec.boats caps and burgees available at:
http://www.msen.com/~pwmeek/cap-main.html

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Steve Weinga » Sat, 26 Aug 2000 04:00:00



Quote:


>>...tie the boat well to the trailer, and maybe tie the trailer down
>>with sand screws (but not an option where I am, since the ground is 6"
>>of packed crushed roof tile...)

>(Hi, Steve; long time no see)

Hi, Pete!  Yup. I'd been out of circulation for a while...(hope all's
well!)

Quote:

>You might find it worth while to set four of the "sand
>screws", digging away the crushed tile and re-packing
>it after. Then they would be available for tieing your
>boat down in the future at short notice. There's lots
>more letters after "D", after all. A 4" ground anchor
>has 3-4000 pounds pull-out in "average soil", and they
>are available up to 6 or 8 inches, at least. I set six
>4" anchors to tie down a construction shed and hooked
>them with wire rope to the rafter purlins. The engineer
>says that is about twice the likely lift of the roof
>(14' by 40') in 100 MPH straight-line winds. It took
>me about 3 hours by myself (with a power auger to drive
>the screws). It would depend on whether your trailer lot
>owner will let you make leasehold improvements (you would
>have to leave the anchors if you left) and whether you
>always get the same location when you park it.

Good points (I use 3" dia 3' sand screws to tie down the jon boat and odd
junk in the back yard).  4 big ones would surely be a good idea for the
boat.  Once the yard owner finishes the improvements (the crushed tile is
new and still settling, every time he does some work, I have to put teh
truck into 4WD to back the boat into the slot or I just toss piles of tile
around :-) I really should consider that.

Thanks, happy friday,

Steve

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Steve Weinga » Sat, 26 Aug 2000 04:00:00



Quote:
>Heh, if you'd prefer to risk having your boat wrecked, be my guest.

>If you want my opinion anyone who has a trailerable vessel (and vehicle to
>tow it) and doesn't depart in advance, assuming enough notice is given,
>should be unable to get insurance on a subsequent vessel if theirs is
>destroyed.

>Intentionally placing your assets at risk and then asking an insurance
>company to cover an *avoidable* incident should make you uninsurable.

>--

Well Karl, if you can take the time off off from work every time there is a
threat (with enought time to actually get far enough away), and are willing
to abandon your home to tow your boat someplace else, where you still might
get hit, be my guest.  (Remember, I know folks that have *tried* to bail
out only to be caught by the storm on the road)

I might expect that your homeowner's insurance company might not like the
explanation that you left your home unprepped and left to save your boat.  
And if you have the tiome to fully prep the house and leave with the boat
far enough in advance of the potential storm, then you have a much better
job or financial situation than I, and I suspect most of us, have.

Lastly, I'm sure glad that my insurance company doesn't think that staying
home during a hurricane, and not taking my boat to wherever to be safe for
the boat, is considered intentionally putting my assets at risk.  That's
why they set the rates as they do.  They *EXPECT* that the boat will stay
on the trailer, in the trailer yard, that's how the policy reads.

I think that you're off-base here...(and I get the impression that you
haven't lived in the hurricane belt during the last several years of
increasing storm activity, that or you have loads of money and time to
burn).  They reality is that you pay up the insurance, do what you can,
then duck and hang on.

Steve

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by hkra.. » Sat, 26 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:



> >Heh, if you'd prefer to risk having your boat wrecked, be my guest.

> >If you want my opinion anyone who has a trailerable vessel (and vehicle to
> >tow it) and doesn't depart in advance, assuming enough notice is given,
> >should be unable to get insurance on a subsequent vessel if theirs is
> >destroyed.

> >Intentionally placing your assets at risk and then asking an insurance
> >company to cover an *avoidable* incident should make you uninsurable.

> >--

> Well Karl, if you can take the time off off from work every time there is a
> threat (with enought time to actually get far enough away), and are willing
> to abandon your home to tow your boat someplace else, where you still might
> get hit, be my guest.  (Remember, I know folks that have *tried* to bail
> out only to be caught by the storm on the road)

> I might expect that your homeowner's insurance company might not like the
> explanation that you left your home unprepped and left to save your boat.
> And if you have the tiome to fully prep the house and leave with the boat
> far enough in advance of the potential storm, then you have a much better
> job or financial situation than I, and I suspect most of us, have.

> Lastly, I'm sure glad that my insurance company doesn't think that staying
> home during a hurricane, and not taking my boat to wherever to be safe for
> the boat, is considered intentionally putting my assets at risk.  That's
> why they set the rates as they do.  They *EXPECT* that the boat will stay
> on the trailer, in the trailer yard, that's how the policy reads.

> I think that you're off-base here...(and I get the impression that you
> haven't lived in the hurricane belt during the last several years of
> increasing storm activity, that or you have loads of money and time to
> burn).  They reality is that you pay up the insurance, do what you can,
> then duck and hang on.

> Steve

Karl has lived in Florida for about two months.
--
Harry Krause
------------

Suicide stunts your growth

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Karl Denning » Sat, 26 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Quote:



>>Heh, if you'd prefer to risk having your boat wrecked, be my guest.

>>If you want my opinion anyone who has a trailerable vessel (and vehicle to
>>tow it) and doesn't depart in advance, assuming enough notice is given,
>>should be unable to get insurance on a subsequent vessel if theirs is
>>destroyed.

>>Intentionally placing your assets at risk and then asking an insurance
>>company to cover an *avoidable* incident should make you uninsurable.

>>--

>Well Karl, if you can take the time off off from work every time there is a
>threat (with enought time to actually get far enough away), and are willing
>to abandon your home to tow your boat someplace else, where you still might
>get hit, be my guest.  (Remember, I know folks that have *tried* to bail
>out only to be caught by the storm on the road)

>I might expect that your homeowner's insurance company might not like the
>explanation that you left your home unprepped and left to save your boat.  
>And if you have the tiome to fully prep the house and leave with the boat
>far enough in advance of the potential storm, then you have a much better
>job or financial situation than I, and I suspect most of us, have.

Prepping the house is not that big of a deal IF you do it in advance.  If
you live in this part of the country where such storms are a known risk,
then not doing so is idiotic.

If a BIG storm is coming, they're going to order you out anyway.  Your
insurance company knows this and its factored into your premiums.

Virtually ALL insurance policies have a clause in them that says you must
take all reasonable steps to prevent damage, or they won't pay for the part
of the damage that a prudent person would have avoided (but you didn't.)

Quote:
>Lastly, I'm sure glad that my insurance company doesn't think that staying
>home during a hurricane, and not taking my boat to wherever to be safe for
>the boat, is considered intentionally putting my assets at risk.  That's
>why they set the rates as they do.  They *EXPECT* that the boat will stay
>on the trailer, in the trailer yard, that's how the policy reads.

Staying at home when a BIG storm is coming is idiotic.  You prep the house
and get the hell out.  You *DO* have shutters and such, right?

If you stay at home in a truly big blow you're asking to be a human
casualty when the house is damaged or worse.  Prep the house, lock it down,
hook the boat up and get the hell out of there.

Quote:
>I think that you're off-base here...(and I get the impression that you
>haven't lived in the hurricane belt during the last several years of
>increasing storm activity, that or you have loads of money and time to
>burn).  They reality is that you pay up the insurance, do what you can,
>then duck and hang on.

>Steve

I like my boat and prefer that it be something other than hurricane fodder.

--
--

http://www.denninger.net    Cost-effective solutions on the Internet
http://childrens-justice.org    Working to protect children's rights

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by hkra.. » Sat, 26 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:

> Prepping the house is not that big of a deal IF you do it in advance.  If
> you live in this part of the country where such storms are a known risk,
> then not doing so is idiotic.

Roughly speaking, Karl, how many Gulf Coast/Florida hurricanes have you
been through?

Harry Krause
------------

Fanatic: can't change his mind, won't change the subject

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Steph » Sat, 26 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:
>Staying at home when a BIG storm is coming is idiotic.  You prep the house
>and get the hell out.  You *DO* have shutters and such, right?

Karl, you realize that the nearest 'safe' state to run to is western Tennessee?
How long do you think it would take to trailer your boat there with the added
traffic? How many false alarms are you going to suffer, before you stop making
the 24 hour drive up, to live in a hotel for a week? You realize that the last
two, or three hurricanes that looked like a serious threat to Florida, ended up
hitting the Carolinas?

It isn't as if your city will have 5 days notice. You will sit and watch it
head straight toward you for 4 days and then the dice are rolled and it either
continues straight for you, or it turns and misses. There are over a thousand
miles of coastline at risk, when a hurricane is headed straight for Florida and
no one can say for sure, which /state/ it will hit, until it is just about on
shore.

Now, if you live in a storm surge area, get yourself inland, no excuses. But
you would have to be retired, and/or independantly wealthy to be able to haul
your boat to TN a few times every fall.
__________________
Stephen
http://stephen.fathom.org
Satellite Hunting 2.0.2 (Y2K compliant!) visible satellite pass prediction
shareware available for download at
http://stephen.fathom.org/sathunt.html

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Stephen Kin » Sat, 26 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Karl - how many times have you put your hurricane shutters up? How long did
it take you to put them up? At my office, I am also responsible for ensuring
that all data on 4 servers and two midrange systems are backed up. (Yes we
do incrementals every night and full system saves every month). Prior to a
storm, I am responsible for doing a full system save on all six systems,
ensuring that all PC's/phones are packed away and covered. I also have the
responsibility of my house to attend to. None of this starts until a
hurricane watch is set. A watch is usually set 24 - 48 hours out. Now - as I
live in South Florida - where do you suggest that I go? Orlando? Hmmm.... we
had a hurricane that was supposed to hit Ft. Lauderdale last year and it
turned north and went across the state near Orlando. No dice. 200 - 300
miles away. The keys? Right. How about Ft. Meyers. You ever tried to drive
across Alligator alley the day before a storm? Good luck!

Most places here are only evacuated within a few miles of the coast. These
would be (in my area) anything east of I-95. Why? We have a lot of people
and only a few ways out. I-95, Fl. Turnpike and I-75. What do you think
would happen if all of the residents of the Keys, Miami and Ft. Lauderdale
tried to evac at the same time? You'd never clear the roads in time.

I have lived near where you do. If I remember right, you live on the Gulf
Coast. Evacuating is easier there because you have 1. Less people and 2.
more escape routes.

I'll ask again - how many Hurricanes have you been through?


Quote:
> Prepping the house is not that big of a deal IF you do it in advance.  If
> you live in this part of the country where such storms are a known risk,
> then not doing so is idiotic.

> If a BIG storm is coming, they're going to order you out anyway.  Your
> insurance company knows this and its factored into your premiums.

> Virtually ALL insurance policies have a clause in them that says you must
> take all reasonable steps to prevent damage, or they won't pay for the
part
> of the damage that a prudent person would have avoided (but you didn't.)

> Staying at home when a BIG storm is coming is idiotic.  You prep the house
> and get the hell out.  You *DO* have shutters and such, right?

> If you stay at home in a truly big blow you're asking to be a human
> casualty when the house is damaged or worse.  Prep the house, lock it
down,
> hook the boat up and get the hell out of there.

> I like my boat and prefer that it be something other than hurricane
fodder.

> --
> --

Activist
> http://www.denninger.net Cost-effective solutions on the Internet
> http://childrens-justice.org Working to protect children's rights

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by David Smalle » Sat, 26 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:

> Staying at home when a BIG storm is coming is idiotic.  You prep the house
> and get the hell out.  You *DO* have shutters and such, right?

> If you stay at home in a truly big blow you're asking to be a human
> casualty when the house is damaged or worse.  Prep the house, lock it down,
> hook the boat up and get the hell out of there.

Karl,

This is one subject you know absolutely _nothing_ about. Your advice
will get people killed.

If you live in a tidal flood zone, sell your house and move somewhere
sensible. In that new house have a "safe room" in the center of the
house with no windows. Stay in there covered with mattresses until after
the storm has passed.

Do -not- try to outrun a storm in an automobile.

--
DAVe & Skoshi, '69 Stamas 26'
http://personal.mia.bellsouth.net/mia/d/r/drsi/

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Karl Denning » Sat, 26 Aug 2000 04:00:00



Quote:

>> Staying at home when a BIG storm is coming is idiotic.  You prep the house
>> and get the hell out.  You *DO* have shutters and such, right?

>> If you stay at home in a truly big blow you're asking to be a human
>> casualty when the house is damaged or worse.  Prep the house, lock it down,
>> hook the boat up and get the hell out of there.

>Karl,

>This is one subject you know absolutely _nothing_ about. Your advice
>will get people killed.

>If you live in a tidal flood zone, sell your house and move somewhere
>sensible. In that new house have a "safe room" in the center of the
>house with no windows. Stay in there covered with mattresses until after
>the storm has passed.

>Do -not- try to outrun a storm in an automobile.

Gee, that's why they evacuate coastal areas, right?

Because people get killed when they take that advice?

--
--

http://www.denninger.net    Cost-effective solutions on the Internet
http://childrens-justice.org    Working to protect children's rights

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Karl Denning » Sat, 26 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

>>Staying at home when a BIG storm is coming is idiotic.  You prep the house
>>and get the hell out.  You *DO* have shutters and such, right?

>Karl, you realize that the nearest 'safe' state to run to is western Tennessee?
>How long do you think it would take to trailer your boat there with the added
>traffic? How many false alarms are you going to suffer, before you stop making
>the 24 hour drive up, to live in a hotel for a week? You realize that the last
>two, or three hurricanes that looked like a serious threat to Florida, ended up
>hitting the Carolinas?

Yep.

I also realize that if you have a boat, you're doing prep work for all of
those serious threats.  Either that or you're going to be making an
insurance claim when you don't.

My point is that if you have something like a boat, which has a very real
risk of being destroyed if not properly prepped, you should either do the
work or have your insurance company refuse to cover you in the future due to
your *NEGLIGENCE*.

Quote:
>It isn't as if your city will have 5 days notice. You will sit and watch it
>head straight toward you for 4 days and then the dice are rolled and it either
>continues straight for you, or it turns and misses. There are over a thousand
>miles of coastline at risk, when a hurricane is headed straight for Florida and
>no one can say for sure, which /state/ it will hit, until it is just about on
>shore.

That's true!

Its also part of the price of living in that area.

Quote:
>Now, if you live in a storm surge area, get yourself inland, no excuses. But
>you would have to be retired, and/or independantly wealthy to be able to haul
>your boat to TN a few times every fall.

If you want to keep a trailered boat and NOT haul it out, then make PROPER
preparations to weather the storm on land.  That means PROPER anchors so
you can secure the trailer AND BOAT to the *GROUND*.

This is really no different than what they do when they put larger boats on
the hard to ride out these storms!

Just leaving a boat in a storage yard with ZERO effort to secure it, ON THE
TRAILER where the wind can get UNDER it, is idiotic.

--
--

http://www.denninger.net    Cost-effective solutions on the Internet
http://childrens-justice.org    Working to protect children's rights

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by David Smalle » Sat, 26 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:




> >> Staying at home when a BIG storm is coming is idiotic.  You prep the house
> >> and get the hell out.  You *DO* have shutters and such, right?

> >> If you stay at home in a truly big blow you're asking to be a human
> >> casualty when the house is damaged or worse.  Prep the house, lock it down,
> >> hook the boat up and get the hell out of there.

> >Karl,

> >This is one subject you know absolutely _nothing_ about. Your advice
> >will get people killed.

> >If you live in a tidal flood zone, sell your house and move somewhere
> >sensible. In that new house have a "safe room" in the center of the
> >house with no windows. Stay in there covered with mattresses until after
> >the storm has passed.

> >Do -not- try to outrun a storm in an automobile.

> Gee, that's why they evacuate coastal areas, right?

> Because people get killed when they take that advice?

So you live in a coastal flooding area? (That is absolutely one of the
stupidest things one can choose to do in America if you care about your
possesions or your life.)

I then assume that your bottom floor of the living area is some 10'-20'
above high tide? You are far safer in the safe room of that properly
stilted house than on the road when the storm hits.

Keep your seatbelt on.  8^)

--
DAVe & Skoshi, '69 Stamas 26'
http://personal.mia.bellsouth.net/mia/d/r/drsi/

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by hkra.. » Sat, 26 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:




> >> Staying at home when a BIG storm is coming is idiotic.  You prep the house
> >> and get the hell out.  You *DO* have shutters and such, right?

> >> If you stay at home in a truly big blow you're asking to be a human
> >> casualty when the house is damaged or worse.  Prep the house, lock it down,
> >> hook the boat up and get the hell out of there.

> >Karl,

> >This is one subject you know absolutely _nothing_ about. Your advice
> >will get people killed.

> >If you live in a tidal flood zone, sell your house and move somewhere
> >sensible. In that new house have a "safe room" in the center of the
> >house with no windows. Stay in there covered with mattresses until after
> >the storm has passed.

> >Do -not- try to outrun a storm in an automobile.

> Gee, that's why they evacuate coastal areas, right?

> Because people get killed when they take that advice?

You planning to evac along I-10 or I-65, Karl? That should be a giggle.

--
Harry Krause
------------

Teddy Bear Usage Instructions (4): Do not plug teddy into electrical
socket