Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Stephen Kin » Wed, 23 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Just curious - what do you do as far as hurricane preps to your boat when
you are stored in rack storage?
 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by V Fon » Wed, 23 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Make sure that you have good insurance and pray.
Your welcome.


Quote:
> Just curious - what do you do as far as hurricane preps to your boat when
> you are stored in rack storage?


 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Stephen Kin » Thu, 24 Aug 2000 04:00:00

That's what I'm doing. I can't think of anything else to do to keep my boat
safe.


Quote:
> Make sure that you have good insurance and pray.
> Your welcome.



> > Just curious - what do you do as far as hurricane preps to your boat
when
> > you are stored in rack storage?


 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Steve Weinga » Thu, 24 Aug 2000 04:00:00



Quote:
>That's what I'm doing. I can't think of anything else to do to keep my
>boat safe.

Like the man said, make sure the insurance is paid.

You can remove all of the electronics, fishing gear, removable upholstery,
etc. to prevent water damage.  Removed any tops/tarps, etc. to reduce
windage.

Make sure that all plugs are out, seacocks open (especially if they are  
scupper seacocks), etc.

Folks talk about filling the boat with some water, especially for trailer
boats.  I'm more worried about crushing the trailer/overweighting the
rack/doing structural damage to the boat with all that extra weight.  So I
fill up the 100 gal tank and let it be...

For a trailer boat, maybe reduce the tire pressure to reduce rolling.

Good luck!

Steve

(happier than hell to have a trailer boat this year, instead of the old
Alberg 30, trussing her up for hurricanes in the water was about 6 - 8
hours of work.  My insurance is paid, the cushions and electronics are in
the garage, the fuel tank is full)

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Stephen Kin » Thu, 24 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Thanks for the info. That's about all I thought I could do. It's on the 3rd
level and it is in the "barn" in it's rack. Let's just hope that it misses.


Quote:


> >That's what I'm doing. I can't think of anything else to do to keep my
> >boat safe.

> Like the man said, make sure the insurance is paid.

> You can remove all of the electronics, fishing gear, removable upholstery,
> etc. to prevent water damage.  Removed any tops/tarps, etc. to reduce
> windage.

> Make sure that all plugs are out, seacocks open (especially if they are
> scupper seacocks), etc.

> Folks talk about filling the boat with some water, especially for trailer
> boats.  I'm more worried about crushing the trailer/overweighting the
> rack/doing structural damage to the boat with all that extra weight.  So I
> fill up the 100 gal tank and let it be...

> For a trailer boat, maybe reduce the tire pressure to reduce rolling.

> Good luck!

> Steve

> (happier than hell to have a trailer boat this year, instead of the old
> Alberg 30, trussing her up for hurricanes in the water was about 6 - 8
> hours of work.  My insurance is paid, the cushions and electronics are in
> the garage, the fuel tank is full)

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Jim Burmeiste » Thu, 24 Aug 2000 04:00:00

put it on a trailer and move it 200 to 300 miles out of the way.......JB
You may have to rent a trailer if possible.
Quote:

> Just curious - what do you do as far as hurricane preps to your boat when
> you are stored in rack storage?

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Steve Weinga » Thu, 24 Aug 2000 04:00:00



Quote:
>Thanks for the info. That's about all I thought I could do. It's on the
>3rd level and it is in the "barn" in it's rack. Let's just hope that it
>misses.

Welllll, we may be getting lucky, Debby just ran into a wide patch of
atmospheric wind shear, the winds are down to 60, the pressure up to 1009
mB.  With any luck she will dis-integrate before she poke out the othere
side of the shear and can regenerate...

We'll see....

Steve

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Steve Weinga » Thu, 24 Aug 2000 04:00:00



Quote:
>put it on a trailer and move it 200 to 300 miles out of the way.......JB
>You may have to rent a trailer if possible.

I would say that is often a bad idea here in FL, unless you leave really
early and go very far.

I personally know several folks who did the 'Get outa Dodge' drill and
ended up getting caught and whacked.  One even spent the hurricane in his
car under an overpass near Orlando.

I'll batten down and stay put...

Steve

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by David Smalle » Thu, 24 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:



> >put it on a trailer and move it 200 to 300 miles out of the way.......JB
> >You may have to rent a trailer if possible.

> I would say that is often a bad idea here in FL, unless you leave really
> early and go very far.

> I personally know several folks who did the 'Get outa Dodge' drill and
> ended up getting caught and whacked.  One even spent the hurricane in his
> car under an overpass near Orlando.

> I'll batten down and stay put...

This is extremely good advice.

Stay put, then deal with it.

--
DAVe & Skoshi, '69 Stamas 26'
http://personal.mia.bellsouth.net/mia/d/r/drsi/

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Peter W. Mee » Fri, 25 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Quote:
>Folks talk about filling the boat with some water, especially for trailer
>boats.  I'm more worried about crushing the trailer/overweighting the
>rack/doing structural damage to the boat with all that extra weight.  So I
>fill up the 100 gal tank and let it be...

You need a good cradle on the ground for that; no trailers,
rack storage, stands, etc. will be strong enough. We are
talking about tripling or quadrupling the weight of the boat here.
Less would be ineffective and not worth the cleanup.

--
  --Pete

rec.boats caps and burgees available at:
http://www.msen.com/~pwmeek/cap-main.html

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by hkra.. » Fri, 25 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:


> >Folks talk about filling the boat with some water, especially for trailer
> >boats.  I'm more worried about crushing the trailer/overweighting the
> >rack/doing structural damage to the boat with all that extra weight.  So I
> >fill up the 100 gal tank and let it be...

> You need a good cradle on the ground for that; no trailers,
> rack storage, stands, etc. will be strong enough. We are
> talking about tripling or quadrupling the weight of the boat here.
> Less would be ineffective and not worth the cleanup.

> --
>   --Pete

> rec.boats caps and burgees available at:
> http://www.msen.com/~pwmeek/cap-main.html

In terms of "damage control," it is hard to think of a more dangerous
place for a boat on land during a strong hurricane than the typical "dry
store" building. These are lightly built structures, typically covered
in sheet metal, and the boats simply sit on the racks, usually three
high.

If I had my druthers, I'd have my boat sitting on a cradle or on a
trailer, and have the trailer strapped to hooks in concrete posts buried
in the ground. I'd have the boat strapped to the trailer.

Ever seen the hurricane straps now used to tie roof rafters to uprights
and the uprights to the foundation in new house construction? Or masonry
beam construction that ties the walls to the foundation and the roof
supports?

Connection to the ground is what does it.

--
Harry Krause
------------

Aliens Invade Los Angeles - And No One Noticed!

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Karl Denning » Fri, 25 Aug 2000 04:00:00



Quote:

>>Folks talk about filling the boat with some water, especially for trailer
>>boats.  I'm more worried about crushing the trailer/overweighting the
>>rack/doing structural damage to the boat with all that extra weight.  So I
>>fill up the 100 gal tank and let it be...

>You need a good cradle on the ground for that; no trailers,
>rack storage, stands, etc. will be strong enough. We are
>talking about tripling or quadrupling the weight of the boat here.
>Less would be ineffective and not worth the cleanup.

Don't.

If you can't get the boat OFF the trailer, get the trailer in a sheltered
building (e.g. a garage with a reinforced door) or get it the hell out of
there before it hits.

One of the worst places for a boat in a storm is on a trailer.  Putting it
on the hard (on a cradle, secured to concrete footings in the ground) is
a valid option, but a boat on a trailer is just asking for both to end up
several houses down the street, overturned and destroyed.

--
--

http://www.denninger.net    Cost-effective solutions on the Internet
http://childrens-justice.org    Working to protect children's rights

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Steve Weinga » Fri, 25 Aug 2000 04:00:00



[snip]

Quote:

>If you can't get the boat OFF the trailer, get the trailer in a
>sheltered building (e.g. a garage with a reinforced door) or get it the
>hell out of there before it hits.

Great ideas, but for most of us down here who keep trailer boat, neither is
possible.

Quote:

>One of the worst places for a boat in a storm is on a trailer.  Putting
>it on the hard (on a cradle, secured to concrete footings in the ground)
>is a valid option, but a boat on a trailer is just asking for both to
>end up several houses down the street, overturned and destroyed.

Maybe true, but again, I don't have much choice, I do keep my boat at a
trailer storage lot so it won't end up on my roof...  But the extent of my
available options (going way back to the beginning of this thread), are to
remove electronics, upholstery, etc; fill the tank up with 700 lbs of gas,
tie the boat well to the trailer, and maybe tie the trailer down with sand
screws (but not an option where I am, since the ground is 6" of packed
crushed roof tile...)

We work with what we have, and keep the insurance paid up!

Steve

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Karl Denning » Fri, 25 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Quote:



>[snip]

>>If you can't get the boat OFF the trailer, get the trailer in a
>>sheltered building (e.g. a garage with a reinforced door) or get it the
>>hell out of there before it hits.

>Great ideas, but for most of us down here who keep trailer boat, neither is
>possible.

>>One of the worst places for a boat in a storm is on a trailer.  Putting
>>it on the hard (on a cradle, secured to concrete footings in the ground)
>>is a valid option, but a boat on a trailer is just asking for both to
>>end up several houses down the street, overturned and destroyed.

>Maybe true, but again, I don't have much choice, I do keep my boat at a
>trailer storage lot so it won't end up on my roof...  But the extent of my
>available options (going way back to the beginning of this thread), are to
>remove electronics, upholstery, etc; fill the tank up with 700 lbs of gas,
>tie the boat well to the trailer, and maybe tie the trailer down with sand
>screws (but not an option where I am, since the ground is 6" of packed
>crushed roof tile...)

>We work with what we have, and keep the insurance paid up!

>Steve

Then hook it up and leave WELL in advance of the storm!

--
--

http://www.denninger.net    Cost-effective solutions on the Internet
http://childrens-justice.org    Working to protect children's rights

 
 
 

Hurricane Preps for Rack Storage

Post by Karl Denning » Fri, 25 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Heh, if you'd prefer to risk having your boat wrecked, be my guest.

If you want my opinion anyone who has a trailerable vessel (and vehicle to
tow it) and doesn't depart in advance, assuming enough notice is given,
should be unable to get insurance on a subsequent vessel if theirs is
destroyed.

Intentionally placing your assets at risk and then asking an insurance
company to cover an *avoidable* incident should make you uninsurable.

--
--

http://www.denninger.net    Cost-effective solutions on the Internet
http://childrens-justice.org    Working to protect children's rights



Quote:
>You must be kidding!   And miss the hurricane party?  No way!



>>Then hook it up and leave WELL in advance of the storm!

>>--