OT: Bush's friendly crowds

OT: Bush's friendly crowds

Post by Harry Kraus » Thu, 19 Aug 2004 07:40:40


Screening can ensure adoring audiences

Monday, August 16, 2004
Darrel Rowland , Alan Johnson and Mark Niquette
THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

When John Kerry comes to Steubenville for a town hall meeting Friday,
anybody can get tickets until the place is full.

When George W. Bush traveled to Columbus earlier this month for an
"Ask President Bush" session, admission was limited primarily to
staunch Republican supporters.

Ohio has been inundated with visits from the presidential candidates
this year, and these two examples illustrate the contrasting styles of
the Bush and Kerry campaigns as they try to pry loose the Buckeye
State's 20 elect***votes.

Of course, the contestants are making their pitch not only to those
attending the events, but also to a much broader audience of
television viewers watching carefully prearranged camera angles of
candidates in front of strategically placed backdrops.

Although both presidential candidates travel with heavy security, Bush
visits are more tightly controlled with limited access to the general
public.

The Kerry camp is much less picky about who can attend and has on
occasion paid the price when protesters attempted to disrupt the
Massachusetts senator's appearances.

Should voters care about the difference?

"I think it does matter because John Kerry wants to have the
opportunity to listen to all kinds of voters in Ohio," said Jennifer
Palmieri, his Ohio campaign spokeswoman.

"We're not going to win this state if we just turn out Democrats.
We're trying to move undecided voters. . . . It's our belief that
undecided voters have already made up their minds about George Bush,
and now they want to know more about John Kerry."

Bush campaign spokesman Kevin Madden said the president's events are
small by design, such as his Aug. 5 appearance before 2,500 supporters
at the Aladdin Shrine Temple.

"If you look at Franklin County alone, we have 5,000 volunteers. We
distributed tickets to everybody who wanted to see the president,
volunteers on the campaign who've worked hard knocking on doors and
stuffing envelopes. The tickets went very quickly," Madden said.

"It seems the Kerry campaign has a really tough time building crowds.
They do their ticket distribution publicly. You can download a ticket
on the Internet. We actually have to turn people away."

(hahahahahahahahahah- now that's a goodie...jesus!)

Palmieri, noting Kerry has attracted 20,000 people to some of his
rallies, said, "If all you're concerned about is making sure your guy
looks good on TV, their strategy works.

"I think they're afraid of a real engagement on the issues. I think
when President Bush comes to Ohio, it's like he's a president from a
different planet."

Paul Beck, chairman of the Political Science Department at Ohio State
University, said each side is trying to play to its candidate's
strengths.

***"Bush is very scripted and always has been been. His advisers, going
back to his gubernatorial campaign, don't want him to speak
extemporaneously," Beck said.****

"That's not a strength for Kerry either, but he's more comfortable
than Bush."

In addition, the Bush campaign, having gone through the 2000 election,
is a team of veterans, Beck said.

He also noted built-in differences.

"A president is different than a presidential candidate. The president
commands more security and more careful scheduling and screening.
That's clearly the case here."

Even so, when a campaign limits access too much, the public can get a
skewed opinion of the candidate, Beck said.

"If the general public sees that, they're put off by it," he said. " .
. . People don't like to feel they're manipulated."

Several reports have surfaced recently about tight controls at Bush
campaign events.

In New Mexico, supporters at an appearance by Vice President***
Cheney were forced to sign a loyalty oath.

In Phoenix, an official from the Kerry campaign was denied admittance
to a Bush speech even though she had a ticket.

During Bush's Columbus visit this month, a select group of people was
chosen to ask him questions, many of which were prearranged. The
participants included Phil Derrow, the president of Ohio Transmission
Corp. who also hosted a May 21 event with U.S. Treasury Secretary
John W. Snow.

At a Dayton appearance by Cheney last week, the invited audience of
1,000 people included veterans, firefighters and "favorable friends of
the campaign," said Carl Wick, Dayton area coordinator for the
Bush-Cheney campaign.

Screening by the Bush campaign and Montgomery County Republican Party
ensured Cheney would have a respectful, enthusiastic audience free
from distractions and hecklers.

During Cheney's July 3 bus trip through northeastern Ohio, all aspects
were tightly controlled. The main event, a rally in Parma, was an
ticket-only affair. At a stop later in downtown Lisbon, only
supporters were told about the event beforehand.

In contrast, when Kerry and his running mate, Sen. John Edwards of
North Carolina, appeared at their first campaign rally together July 7
in Cleveland, it was held in a downtown park open to the public.

As usual, local Democrats and Kerry campaign supporters got special
tickets to get in the gated area closest to the stage that day, but a
crowd estimated at between 12,000 and 15,000 braved threatening skies
and stood in line to go through security screening to fill out the
rest of the space in the park.

Perhaps because of the Kerry campaign's greater openness, hecklers
frequently show up at his events. During an April 6 stop in
Cincinnati, for example, a couple dozen people started clapping
flip-flop sandals together during his speech as a reminder of his
alleged changes in position on several issues.

At a June 15 rally in Westgate Park on the Hilltop, demonstrators in a
nearby house played the theme song from the old television show
Flipper so loudly that many in the audience couldn't hear Kerry.

Lately, however, the Democratic campaign has been trying to turn the
tables on the protesters. At a July 31 visit by Kerry and Edwards to
Wheeling, W.Va., Edwards used a relatively minor disruption in the
crowd to deplore the negativity in the presidential campaign.

"Aren't you sick of it?" he said to loud cheers.

http://SportToday.org/

--
Save America - Defeat Bush!

 
 
 

OT: Bush's friendly crowds

Post by jps » Thu, 19 Aug 2004 08:34:02


says...

Quote:
> Screening can ensure adoring audiences

Here's letters to the editor at the Seattle Times after Bush's visit
last week...

Battleground Puget Sound
Bush takes the town the way tax cuts took the economy

Editor, The Times:

As I sat roasting in the sun in the horrid traffic caused by President
Bush's motorcade Saturday afternoon, it seemed to me something wasn't
right ("Campaign stops give Northwest center sage: Bush in Seattle,"
Times page one, Aug. 14).

As Bush invaded our lovely city to visit the Mecca of Puget Sound's rich
and famous, Medina, to suck it up with fellow millionaires gleefully
thrusting a couple million more into the Bush campaign chest, the rest
of us common folk had to pay for this private affair not only with our
tax dollars, but also with our precious time, wasted in traffic, and our
lungs, wasted in exhaust fumes.

This struck me as rather unfair and out of balance. But I realized this
situation pretty much patterned Bush's tax cuts: I got 200 bucks to pay
for gas. The Medina folk got tens of thousands =3F plenty of dough to
repay the favor to Bush of campaign contributions.

The media like to say how Bush is the kind of guy we common folk want to
have a beer with. Honestly, Bush is about the last guy with whom I'd
want to enjoy a pint. And it seems pretty clear from the crowd at Bush's
party in Medina that he doesn't really want to share a beverage with the
common folk like me. He just wants us to pay for the party.
=3F Dave Gamrath, Seattle

Armored division

The most telling words in the "Bush in Seattle" article were "The event
was closed to the public."

As is the rest of the Bush presidency.
=3F Steve Hawley, Issaquah

Resistance is futile

Friday, I had the opportunity to watch George Bush's wealthy donors
arrive at his Medina fund-raiser, from my grandfather's property, almost
directly across the street. My family and I stood near the street and
held a number of hand-made signs.

Protesters were restricted to their own private land (the cops asked us
twice whether or not we actually lived there =3F and clearly instructed us
not to allow non-residents onto our property) and the far-off Medina
park (which Bush bypassed entirely), while supporters moved about freely
up and down the public streets that the police had closed, carrying
stickers, signs and banners.

After Bush arrived, the protesters tried to take to the streets as well,
and the police responded physically, even shoving a reporter covering
the event.

Why should the Bush supporters exercise their First Amendment rights
unabridged, and not the Kerry supporters? The extensive police presence
would have ensured that we could not get out of hand. The actual result
seemed unfair at best.

No wonder the protest seemed small and disorganized.
=3F Chris Maryatt, Seattle

Conduct unbecoming

The Bush-Cheney sign on Highway 305 on Bainbridge Island was defaced
this weekend.

The proper response to a Bush-Cheney sign is to put up a Kerry-Edwards
sign, not deface the Bush-Cheney sign.

Will the left please grow up.
=3F Gary Tripp, Bainbridge Island

Liberties approved

When we read about George Bush's visit to Medina, we decided to take our
young granddaughter to have the experience of seeing a president; and to
witness diverse interest groups, demonstrating America's political
process at work.

Imagine how appalling it was to stand by the side of the road and listen
to Republicans cruise by in cars, yelling "(expletive) you!" and using
the hand gesture that means the same thing.

Progressive groups (Veterans for Peace, environmentalists, ACORN,
independent demonstrators, etc.) did not respond in kind.

It was a sad lesson for a child. But I suppose Vice President***
Cheney would have approved, saying the non-Republicans had it coming,
and that it "felt good."
=3F Tony and Suzy Ball, Renton

Low on provisions

In a country where we have still not wiped out hunger, where social-
service budgets are slashed drastically, unemployment is at an all-time
high, and the deficit is out of control, we have the president of the
United States accepting $10,000 for his campaign in exchange for a
picture with him.

Does anyone else think there is something wrong with this picture?
=3F Traci Hoenstine, Lake Forest Park

Put on half rations

Bush and Kerry raising millions of dollars. (see "Campaign stops," Aug.
14). Is there something wrong with me? Millions being raised for
political campaigns with Americans out of work, needing health care,
kids needing better education.

Is there not a better way to campaign?
=3F Carol Robertson, Bellingham

Whites of his eyes

As he has done across the country, President Bush breezed in and out of
the Seattle area without holding a public rally. Bush events are
apparently invitation-only affairs that only his supporters are allowed
to attend.

In contrast, Sen. John Kerry held a public rally open to all in Portland
that attracted 50,000 ("Kerry in Portland," front page, Aug. 14).

Isn't it ironic that the candidate who claims he is tough, courageous,
and will keep our country safe appears to be terrified of facing those
from whom he seeks a vote?
=3F Roberta Domos, Redmond

 
 
 

OT: Bush's friendly crowds

Post by jim- » Fri, 20 Aug 2004 07:50:14

Just did a search for Kerry events in Steubenville, Ohio on the
Kerry/Edwards home page.  No mention of a town hall meeting on August 20th.

Here is the link

http://SportToday.org/

You think he forgot about it?  He-he-he.


Quote:
> Screening can ensure adoring audiences

> Monday, August 16, 2004
> Darrel Rowland , Alan Johnson and Mark Niquette
> THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

> When John Kerry comes to Steubenville for a town hall meeting Friday,
> anybody can get tickets until the place is full.

> When George W. Bush traveled to Columbus earlier this month for an
> "Ask President Bush" session, admission was limited primarily to
> staunch Republican supporters.

> Ohio has been inundated with visits from the presidential candidates
> this year, and these two examples illustrate the contrasting styles of
> the Bush and Kerry campaigns as they try to pry loose the Buckeye
> State's 20 elect***votes.

> Of course, the contestants are making their pitch not only to those
> attending the events, but also to a much broader audience of
> television viewers watching carefully prearranged camera angles of
> candidates in front of strategically placed backdrops.

> Although both presidential candidates travel with heavy security, Bush
> visits are more tightly controlled with limited access to the general
> public.

> The Kerry camp is much less picky about who can attend and has on
> occasion paid the price when protesters attempted to disrupt the
> Massachusetts senator's appearances.

> Should voters care about the difference?

> "I think it does matter because John Kerry wants to have the
> opportunity to listen to all kinds of voters in Ohio," said Jennifer
> Palmieri, his Ohio campaign spokeswoman.

> "We're not going to win this state if we just turn out Democrats.
> We're trying to move undecided voters. . . . It's our belief that
> undecided voters have already made up their minds about George Bush,
> and now they want to know more about John Kerry."

> Bush campaign spokesman Kevin Madden said the president's events are
> small by design, such as his Aug. 5 appearance before 2,500 supporters
> at the Aladdin Shrine Temple.

> "If you look at Franklin County alone, we have 5,000 volunteers. We
> distributed tickets to everybody who wanted to see the president,
> volunteers on the campaign who've worked hard knocking on doors and
> stuffing envelopes. The tickets went very quickly," Madden said.

> "It seems the Kerry campaign has a really tough time building crowds.
> They do their ticket distribution publicly. You can download a ticket
> on the Internet. We actually have to turn people away."

> (hahahahahahahahahah- now that's a goodie...jesus!)

> Palmieri, noting Kerry has attracted 20,000 people to some of his
> rallies, said, "If all you're concerned about is making sure your guy
> looks good on TV, their strategy works.

> "I think they're afraid of a real engagement on the issues. I think
> when President Bush comes to Ohio, it's like he's a president from a
> different planet."

> Paul Beck, chairman of the Political Science Department at Ohio State
> University, said each side is trying to play to its candidate's
> strengths.

> ***"Bush is very scripted and always has been been. His advisers, going
> back to his gubernatorial campaign, don't want him to speak
> extemporaneously," Beck said.****

> "That's not a strength for Kerry either, but he's more comfortable
> than Bush."

> In addition, the Bush campaign, having gone through the 2000 election,
> is a team of veterans, Beck said.

> He also noted built-in differences.

> "A president is different than a presidential candidate. The president
> commands more security and more careful scheduling and screening.
> That's clearly the case here."

> Even so, when a campaign limits access too much, the public can get a
> skewed opinion of the candidate, Beck said.

> "If the general public sees that, they're put off by it," he said. " .
> . . People don't like to feel they're manipulated."

> Several reports have surfaced recently about tight controls at Bush
> campaign events.

> In New Mexico, supporters at an appearance by Vice President***
> Cheney were forced to sign a loyalty oath.

> In Phoenix, an official from the Kerry campaign was denied admittance
> to a Bush speech even though she had a ticket.

> During Bush's Columbus visit this month, a select group of people was
> chosen to ask him questions, many of which were prearranged. The
> participants included Phil Derrow, the president of Ohio Transmission
> Corp. who also hosted a May 21 event with U.S. Treasury Secretary
> John W. Snow.

> At a Dayton appearance by Cheney last week, the invited audience of
> 1,000 people included veterans, firefighters and "favorable friends of
> the campaign," said Carl Wick, Dayton area coordinator for the
> Bush-Cheney campaign.

> Screening by the Bush campaign and Montgomery County Republican Party
> ensured Cheney would have a respectful, enthusiastic audience free
> from distractions and hecklers.

> During Cheney's July 3 bus trip through northeastern Ohio, all aspects
> were tightly controlled. The main event, a rally in Parma, was an
> ticket-only affair. At a stop later in downtown Lisbon, only
> supporters were told about the event beforehand.

> In contrast, when Kerry and his running mate, Sen. John Edwards of
> North Carolina, appeared at their first campaign rally together July 7
> in Cleveland, it was held in a downtown park open to the public.

> As usual, local Democrats and Kerry campaign supporters got special
> tickets to get in the gated area closest to the stage that day, but a
> crowd estimated at between 12,000 and 15,000 braved threatening skies
> and stood in line to go through security screening to fill out the
> rest of the space in the park.

> Perhaps because of the Kerry campaign's greater openness, hecklers
> frequently show up at his events. During an April 6 stop in
> Cincinnati, for example, a couple dozen people started clapping
> flip-flop sandals together during his speech as a reminder of his
> alleged changes in position on several issues.

> At a June 15 rally in Westgate Park on the Hilltop, demonstrators in a
> nearby house played the theme song from the old television show
> Flipper so loudly that many in the audience couldn't hear Kerry.

> Lately, however, the Democratic campaign has been trying to turn the
> tables on the protesters. At a July 31 visit by Kerry and Edwards to
> Wheeling, W.Va., Edwards used a relatively minor disruption in the
> crowd to deplore the negativity in the presidential campaign.

> "Aren't you sick of it?" he said to loud cheers.

> http://SportToday.org/

> --
> Save America - Defeat Bush!


 
 
 

OT: Bush's friendly crowds

Post by P. Frit » Fri, 20 Aug 2004 12:46:12



  > Just did a search for Kerry events in Steubenville, Ohio on the
  > Kerry/Edwards home page.  No mention of a town hall meeting on August
20th.

  Even if it is true.....all that means is that Kerry doesn't have enough
staunch supporters to fill the place,

  >
  > Here is the link
  >
  > http://SportToday.org/
  >
  > You think he forgot about it?  He-he-he.
  >
  >


  > > Screening can ensure adoring audiences
  > >
  > > Monday, August 16, 2004
  > > Darrel Rowland , Alan Johnson and Mark Niquette
  > > THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH
  > >
  > > When John Kerry comes to Steubenville for a town hall meeting Friday,
  > > anybody can get tickets until the place is full.
  > >
  > > When George W. Bush traveled to Columbus earlier this month for an
  > > "Ask President Bush" session, admission was limited primarily to
  > > staunch Republican supporters.
  > >
  > > Ohio has been inundated with visits from the presidential candidates
  > > this year, and these two examples illustrate the contrasting styles of
  > > the Bush and Kerry campaigns as they try to pry loose the Buckeye
  > > State's 20 elect***votes.
  > >
  > > Of course, the contestants are making their pitch not only to those
  > > attending the events, but also to a much broader audience of
  > > television viewers watching carefully prearranged camera angles of
  > > candidates in front of strategically placed backdrops.
  > >
  > > Although both presidential candidates travel with heavy security, Bush
  > > visits are more tightly controlled with limited access to the general
  > > public.
  > >
  > > The Kerry camp is much less picky about who can attend - and has on
  > > occasion paid the price when protesters attempted to disrupt the
  > > Massachusetts senator's appearances.
  > >
  > > Should voters care about the difference?
  > >
  > > "I think it does matter because John Kerry wants to have the
  > > opportunity to listen to all kinds of voters in Ohio," said Jennifer
  > > Palmieri, his Ohio campaign spokeswoman.
  > >
  > > "We're not going to win this state if we just turn out Democrats.
  > > We're trying to move undecided voters. . . . It's our belief that
  > > undecided voters have already made up their minds about George Bush,
  > > and now they want to know more about John Kerry."
  > >
  > > Bush campaign spokesman Kevin Madden said the president's events are
  > > small by design, such as his Aug. 5 appearance before 2,500 supporters
  > > at the Aladdin Shrine Temple.
  > >
  > > "If you look at Franklin County alone, we have 5,000 volunteers. We
  > > distributed tickets to everybody who wanted to see the president,
  > > volunteers on the campaign who've worked hard knocking on doors and
  > > stuffing envelopes. The tickets went very quickly," Madden said.
  > >
  > > "It seems the Kerry campaign has a really tough time building crowds.
  > > They do their ticket distribution publicly. You can download a ticket
  > > on the Internet. We actually have to turn people away."
  > >
  > > (hahahahahahahahahah- now that's a goodie...jesus!)
  > >
  > > Palmieri, noting Kerry has attracted 20,000 people to some of his
  > > rallies, said, "If all you're concerned about is making sure your guy
  > > looks good on TV, their strategy works.
  > >
  > > "I think they're afraid of a real engagement on the issues. I think
  > > when President Bush comes to Ohio, it's like he's a president from a
  > > different planet."
  > >
  > > Paul Beck, chairman of the Political Science Department at Ohio State
  > > University, said each side is trying to play to its candidate's
  > > strengths.
  > >
  > > ***"Bush is very scripted and always has been been. His advisers,
going
  > > back to his gubernatorial campaign, don't want him to speak
  > > extemporaneously," Beck said.****
  > >
  > > "That's not a strength for Kerry either, but he's more comfortable
  > > than Bush."
  > >
  > > In addition, the Bush campaign, having gone through the 2000 election,
  > > is a team of veterans, Beck said.
  > >
  > > He also noted built-in differences.
  > >
  > > "A president is different than a presidential candidate. The president
  > > commands more security and more careful scheduling and screening.
  > > That's clearly the case here."
  > >
  > > Even so, when a campaign limits access too much, the public can get a
  > > skewed opinion of the candidate, Beck said.
  > >
  > > "If the general public sees that, they're put off by it," he said. " .
  > > . . People don't like to feel they're manipulated."
  > >
  > > Several reports have surfaced recently about tight controls at Bush
  > > campaign events.
  > >
  > > In New Mexico, supporters at an appearance by Vice President***
  > > Cheney were forced to sign a loyalty oath.
  > >
  > > In Phoenix, an official from the Kerry campaign was denied admittance
  > > to a Bush speech even though she had a ticket.
  > >
  > > During Bush's Columbus visit this month, a select group of people was
  > > chosen to ask him questions, many of which were prearranged. The
  > > participants included Phil Derrow, the president of Ohio Transmission
  > > Corp. - who also hosted a May 21 event with U.S. Treasury Secretary
  > > John W. Snow.
  > >
  > > At a Dayton appearance by Cheney last week, the invited audience of
  > > 1,000 people included veterans, firefighters and "favorable friends of
  > > the campaign," said Carl Wick, Dayton area coordinator for the
  > > Bush-Cheney campaign.
  > >
  > > Screening by the Bush campaign and Montgomery County Republican Party
  > > ensured Cheney would have a respectful, enthusiastic audience free
  > > from distractions and hecklers.
  > >
  > > During Cheney's July 3 bus trip through northeastern Ohio, all aspects
  > > were tightly controlled. The main event, a rally in Parma, was an
  > > ticket-only affair. At a stop later in downtown Lisbon, only
  > > supporters were told about the event beforehand.
  > >
  > > In contrast, when Kerry and his running mate, Sen. John Edwards of
  > > North Carolina, appeared at their first campaign rally together July 7
  > > in Cleveland, it was held in a downtown park open to the public.
  > >
  > > As usual, local Democrats and Kerry campaign supporters got special
  > > tickets to get in the gated area closest to the stage that day, but a
  > > crowd estimated at between 12,000 and 15,000 braved threatening skies
  > > and stood in line to go through security screening to fill out the
  > > rest of the space in the park.
  > >
  > > Perhaps because of the Kerry campaign's greater openness, hecklers
  > > frequently show up at his events. During an April 6 stop in
  > > Cincinnati, for example, a couple dozen people started clapping
  > > flip-flop sandals together during his speech as a reminder of his
  > > alleged changes in position on several issues.
  > >
  > > At a June 15 rally in Westgate Park on the Hilltop, demonstrators in a
  > > nearby house played the theme song from the old television show
  > > Flipper so loudly that many in the audience couldn't hear Kerry.
  > >
  > > Lately, however, the Democratic campaign has been trying to turn the
  > > tables on the protesters. At a July 31 visit by Kerry and Edwards to
  > > Wheeling, W.Va., Edwards used a relatively minor disruption in the
  > > crowd to deplore the negativity in the presidential campaign.
  > >
  > > "Aren't you sick of it?" he said to loud cheers.
  > >
  > > http://SportToday.org/
  > >
  > >
  > >
  > > --
  > > Save America - Defeat Bush!
  >
  >

 
 
 

OT: Bush's friendly crowds

Post by jps » Sat, 21 Aug 2004 01:30:46



Quote:
>   Even if it is true.....all that means is that Kerry doesn't have enough
> staunch supporters to fill the place,

As in the 50,000 people who turned out to see him in Portland?

Bush attended a private function in the same city that attracted about
10 people.  All of them with money.

jps