Glassing a wood hulled boat?

Glassing a wood hulled boat?

Post by Bill Flatt » Wed, 07 Apr 1999 04:00:00


Is it possible to completely glass the hull of a older wooden hulled boat? If
so where would one go to for some more information on the subject?

Thanks

 
 
 

Glassing a wood hulled boat?

Post by John Abercromb » Wed, 07 Apr 1999 04:00:00

Quote:

>Is it possible to completely glass the hull of a older wooden hulled boat? If
>so where would one go to for some more information on the subject?

I recall seeing a book on this topic in my public library - I think it
was by Alan Vaitses (not sure)- it will be long out of print.

I think it is safe to say that most attempts to glass a traditional
wooden boat are failures- it is difficult to get the glass to adhere
to the hull, and (more importantly) you can cause additional damage to
the original hull. There have been some successful renovations of
older boats which were in poor shape where several layers of wood
veneer were bonded to the hull with epoxy. The resulting structure
could then be glassed. The Carrs did this to "Curlew" and the
Jesperson boat yard in BC did a number of jobs of this kind.

Is it not possible to just repair the hull as-is ?

John

 
 
 

Glassing a wood hulled boat?

Post by Pierre Mitha » Wed, 07 Apr 1999 04:00:00

Unless you want to destroy the hull, don't even consider glassing it.  The
best way yo do this type of repair is to cold-mould a couple of layers of
veneer to the hull, then fiberglass it with epoxy and cloth. The veneers
will give new strength to the hull, make it water tight, and prevent the
hull from moving.  The glass them just serves as abrasion, and borer
protection.

if you just fiberglass the hull, The wood will still move, causing the
fiberglass to crack and let water into the joints.  this will cause the hull
to rot from the "outside" in.  I've seem many boats destroyed by this.

If your boat is just leaking, recaulk it.  It's cheaper and not too
difficult to do with the right tools.

Pierre

Quote:

>Is it possible to completely glass the hull of a older wooden hulled boat?
If
>so where would one go to for some more information on the subject?

>Thanks


 
 
 

Glassing a wood hulled boat?

Post by Bryon Kas » Wed, 07 Apr 1999 04:00:00

Most epoxy vendors publish their method of glassing using their
resins. West epoxy as well as others tout their wares as the best
method. It all depends on the type of craft and the wood and
planking setup. The easiest to do is a plywood boat. Planked hulls
need more reinforcing to stabilize the planking. I prefer using
polyester resin and mats, roving laminates. THis makes the boat
both waterproof and stabile. I do however suggest coating the
underside with epoxie for long term waterproofing after it is laminated.
Mechanical fastening is always good with SS staples during the early
laminate stage. One must consider also covering the insides to keep
water in the bilges from getting into the laminate. The best time
to do fiberglassing over wood is during intial construction. Older
boats can have their lifes extended but most of them are a waste
and should be chopped up.
Bryon Kass
  webmaster and
  Custom Design
  150 Mechanic St.
  Foxboro, MA 02035
  508-543-9068 or fax 508-543-5127, Foot yard 508-384-2415
  in THE ENGINE ROOM http://getit.at/engineroom
Quote:

> Is it possible to completely glass the hull of a older wooden hulled boat? If
> so where would one go to for some more information on the subject?

> Thanks

 
 
 

Glassing a wood hulled boat?

Post by macnaughton.co » Fri, 09 Apr 1999 04:00:00

I would generally oppose either glassing or cold molding over an existing
caulked seam carvel planked hull. If you need to do it because it is leaking
or not strong enough you should just fix whatever's wrong. If the boat's in
good shape why do it? Two stories: 1) A gentleman came to our shop with a
boat he wanted fiberglassed "because it takes two electric pumps to keep it
afloat". We suggested that it could easily cost $7,000 to do a good job and
that we should find out why it was leaking first. He said as far as he was
concerned he'd spend the $7,000 but we were welcome to try to stop the leaks
first if we wanted. We found two things. The garboards next to the horn
timber were originally fastened with too short screws, which we simply
replaced with the correct ones. The second thing was that there were a few
feet of seams with cracked seam compound. Total cost to have the boat leak
free again? If I remember correctly it was between $200 and $300 dollars.
That was about seven years ago and it hasn't leaked significantly since.
2. A gentleman we knew with a thirty some odd foot powerboat was tired of
her leaking and was going to cold mold over the bottom. We suggested he find
and fix the leaks before he considered it. He said he wouldn't "bother"
because the cold molding would surely fix it. As I remember he paid around
$6,000 for materials and incurred a lot of expenses for storage at the yard
he was in. Plus it took him months to get the work done. When he put the
boat back in the water it leaked precisely as much as it did before. NOW he
HAD to find where it was leaking. This turned out to be the stuffing box.
Total cost to fix? A couple of dollars for flax packing material.

I am happy to help advise people on specific problems and projects.

Tom MacNaughton
Naval Architect
http://www.macnaughtongroup.com

Quote:

>Unless you want to destroy the hull, don't even consider glassing it.  The
>best way yo do this type of repair is to cold-mould a couple of layers of
>veneer to the hull, then fiberglass it with epoxy and cloth. The veneers
>will give new strength to the hull, make it water tight, and prevent the
>hull from moving.  The glass them just serves as abrasion, and borer
>protection.

>if you just fiberglass the hull, The wood will still move, causing the
>fiberglass to crack and let water into the joints.  this will cause the
hull
>to rot from the "outside" in.  I've seem many boats destroyed by this.

>If your boat is just leaking, recaulk it.  It's cheaper and not too
>difficult to do with the right tools.

>Pierre


>>Is it possible to completely glass the hull of a older wooden hulled boat?
>If
>>so where would one go to for some more information on the subject?

>>Thanks

 
 
 

Glassing a wood hulled boat?

Post by Anders Svensso » Sat, 10 Apr 1999 04:00:00

OK, here is another real life story:

I owned a old, clincer built double ender some 25 years ago. This was a boat
that I bought too expensively, ofcourse, as the hull was in pretty bad shape,
and couldnt be economically restored - it involved changing most of the planking
(due to iron rot in the oak), part of the keel and most frames, all sawn. Sad,
because the rest of the boat (a sailboat is 1/3 hull, 1/3 gear and 1/3 rig and
sails) wasn't too bad.

I decided to try sheating it. In spite of the boat being clinker (lots of hard
edges) and using polyester and cloth (not as strong or adhesive as epoxy) the
result was quite good.

I did use much materials, and could too, as the type and design of the boat
allowed some extra weight without problems. In fact, I probably used as much
material as a would be proper for a lightweight fiberglass boat of the same
size.

What I did right was probably sanding the hull down thoroughly, using a lot of
material and I also made a point of repairing (crudely) all really rotten parts
on the hull. I also took great care to not paint the boats inside anymore. I
sold the boat some years thereafter, but the boat still sails - and from the
looks of it, in no worse shape now than then.

I think that sheating can be sucessfully done, if one accepts that the boat will
be heavier, that it get a finite (but perhaps quite long) life and (this is
important) one accepts that the structural integrity (strength) isn't restored
fully so the boat will not be a blue water cruiser even if it once was.

Today, I would have gone for a old, fiberglass vessel, and invested all that
hard work in rejuvenating that if I had the time and energy I had then - but at
the time (and wallet content played a big part then :-) it seemed like a
worthwhile project - and I think it was.

Anders

macnaughton.com skrev:

Quote:
> I would generally oppose either glassing or cold molding over an existing
> caulked seam carvel planked hull. If you need to do it because it is leaking
> or not strong enough you should just fix whatever's wrong. If the boat's in
> good shape why do it? Two stories: 1) A gentleman came to our shop with a
> boat he wanted fiberglassed "because it takes two electric pumps to keep it
> afloat". We suggested that it could easily cost $7,000 to do a good job and
> that we should find out why it was leaking first. He said as far as he was
> concerned he'd spend the $7,000 but we were welcome to try to stop the leaks
> first if we wanted. We found two things. The garboards next to the horn
> timber were originally fastened with too short screws, which we simply
> replaced with the correct ones. The second thing was that there were a few
> feet of seams with cracked seam compound. Total cost to have the boat leak
> free again? If I remember correctly it was between $200 and $300 dollars.
> That was about seven years ago and it hasn't leaked significantly since.
> 2. A gentleman we knew with a thirty some odd foot powerboat was tired of
> her leaking and was going to cold mold over the bottom. We suggested he find
> and fix the leaks before he considered it. He said he wouldn't "bother"
> because the cold molding would surely fix it. As I remember he paid around
> $6,000 for materials and incurred a lot of expenses for storage at the yard
> he was in. Plus it took him months to get the work done. When he put the
> boat back in the water it leaked precisely as much as it did before. NOW he
> HAD to find where it was leaking. This turned out to be the stuffing box.
> Total cost to fix? A couple of dollars for flax packing material.

> I am happy to help advise people on specific problems and projects.

> Tom MacNaughton
> Naval Architect
> http://www.macnaughtongroup.com


> >Unless you want to destroy the hull, don't even consider glassing it.  The
> >best way yo do this type of repair is to cold-mould a couple of layers of
> >veneer to the hull, then fiberglass it with epoxy and cloth. The veneers
> >will give new strength to the hull, make it water tight, and prevent the
> >hull from moving.  The glass them just serves as abrasion, and borer
> >protection.

> >if you just fiberglass the hull, The wood will still move, causing the
> >fiberglass to crack and let water into the joints.  this will cause the
> hull
> >to rot from the "outside" in.  I've seem many boats destroyed by this.

> >If your boat is just leaking, recaulk it.  It's cheaper and not too
> >difficult to do with the right tools.

> >Pierre


> >>Is it possible to completely glass the hull of a older wooden hulled boat?
> >If
> >>so where would one go to for some more information on the subject?

> >>Thanks

--
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Anders Svensson

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