Canoe building: beginner's questions

Canoe building: beginner's questions

Post by Javier G. Blan » Sat, 29 Sep 2001 22:01:57


Good morning:

I am considering building a canoe during the Fall/Winter seasons.
Basically it will be used for leisure paddling and bass fishing at
local lake.

I have found several websites carrying canoe kits and/or plans. There
is this company: http://www.geodesicairoliteboats.com in which I have
my eyes set on their models Snow Shoe 14 and Snow Shoe Explorer 14.
Have any of you guys built any of those canoes?

Regarding that source of canoe plans (or any other source that you may
recommend), how much time and money is involved in building a canoe?
What level of expertise is needed to accomplish it?

Thanks a lot for any information that you guys can offer.

Javier
Woodbridge, VA

 
 
 

Canoe building: beginner's questions

Post by Jacques Merten » Sun, 30 Sep 2001 00:24:48

Since you are looking in the 14' range, how about a free plan?
http://www.boatbuilder-online.com/free/cheapcanoe.htm

--
Jacques Mertens
Boat Plans OnLine
http://www.bateau.com



Quote:
> Good morning:

> I am considering building a canoe during the Fall/Winter seasons.
> Basically it will be used for leisure paddling and bass fishing at
> local lake.

> I have found several websites carrying canoe kits and/or plans. There
> is this company: http://www.geodesicairoliteboats.com in which I have
> my eyes set on their models Snow Shoe 14 and Snow Shoe Explorer 14.
> Have any of you guys built any of those canoes?

> Regarding that source of canoe plans (or any other source that you may
> recommend), how much time and money is involved in building a canoe?
> What level of expertise is needed to accomplish it?

> Thanks a lot for any information that you guys can offer.

> Javier
> Woodbridge, VA


 
 
 

Canoe building: beginner's questions

Post by Larry Feen » Sun, 30 Sep 2001 00:28:48


Quote:

>Good morning:

>I am considering building a canoe during the Fall/Winter seasons.
 There
>is this company: http://www.geodesicairoliteboats.com in which I have
>my eyes set on their models Snow Shoe 14 and Snow Shoe Explorer 14.
>Have any of you guys built any of those canoes?

I built the Snow Shoe 14 last winter.  I ordered the "kit" from the
designer, although this basically just consists of the materials you
will need, except the wood.  The heat-shrink Dacron fabric,  the
heat-sensitive tape and the kevlar could probably be sourced elsewhere
but this was easier.

I spent a total of 73 hours constructing this boat and found the
process quite fun.  The plans and instructions were complete and
straightforward.  My total cost was $321, which included the
aforementioned kit, good wood (Sitka spruce and white oak for the
steamed ribs), the paint and varnish and the materials for the
steambox.  It did not include the paddle, which I ordered from Shaw &
Tenney.

The boat handles well and weighs in at  a mere 19 lbs.  The tradeoff
is a certain fragility.  The skin can be pretty easily punctured (and
easily repaired in the field with duct tape until a more permanent
repair, also easily accomplished, can be done in the shop) and the
ribs and stringers are very lightweight.

I built this boat intending to take it on an extended wilderness trip
in British Columbia.  In the end, my concerns about her fragility made
me decide against taking her.  Probably a good idea, too, since I made
the acquaintance of a rather larger, submerged deadhead in the swift
currents of the Cariboo River.  This left my fiberglass kayak unfazed
but would have done serious damage to the lightweight canoe.

Larry Feeney
Bellingham, WA

 
 
 

Canoe building: beginner's questions

Post by Jim Conli » Sun, 30 Sep 2001 06:58:23

There are at least five generic ways for a home-builder to build a boat that
might be called a canoe.  They vary a lot in the labor, materials, skills and
tools required and they vary a lot in their beauty, ruggedness, weight and
performance.  Fortunately, there are some good resources to help you make a
reasoned decision among the several mthods.

The pirogue is a simple hard-chined  boat, generally built of plywood and
frequently using 'stitch & glue' techniques.  The bateau.com suggestion
earlier in this thread is of this type.  Start with Jacques' website.  Also
search for 'six hour canoe' and the like.  These are easy boats to build.

The Geodesic Airolite boats of Platt Monfort are really intriguing.  They're
amazingly light.  Get Platt's video to judge whether the construction is
within your skills.

Cedar strip composite boats are light, strong, generally very  pretty.  Get
Ted Moores' book, Canoecraft and Mac McCarthy's, 'Featherweight
Boatbuilding'.

Glued plywood lapstrake boats are light and pretty.  Get Tom Hill's book,
Ultralight Boatbuilding' and the accompanying video from Woodenboat.
Chesapeake light Craft has some kits for these.  See their website
www.clcboats.com

The traditional cedar & canvas canoe is a thing of beauty, but not one in a
hundred of us has the skill and dedication to undertake one.  Start with
Jerry Stelmok's book, 'Building the Maine Guide Canoe'.

Personally, for a boat to take one person fishing, the solo strip canoe like
McCarthy's  Wee Lassie II
is a delight.

Building a boat, even a small and simple one, is an important expression of
yourself,  Pick a decent designer, good paterials, and build it honestly.
You'll be pleased with the result.
Jim

Quote:

> Good morning:

> I am considering building a canoe during the Fall/Winter seasons.
> Basically it will be used for leisure paddling and bass fishing at
> local lake.

> I have found several websites carrying canoe kits and/or plans. There
> is this company: http://www.geodesicairoliteboats.com in which I have
> my eyes set on their models Snow Shoe 14 and Snow Shoe Explorer 14.
> Have any of you guys built any of those canoes?

> Regarding that source of canoe plans (or any other source that you may
> recommend), how much time and money is involved in building a canoe?
> What level of expertise is needed to accomplish it?

> Thanks a lot for any information that you guys can offer.

> Javier
> Woodbridge, VA

 
 
 

Canoe building: beginner's questions

Post by stev » Fri, 19 Oct 2001 13:12:02

Those geodesic fabric covered boats are OK.
A little to fragile for me though.
Have you thought of an Adirondack Guideboat?
While the traditional method of building is probably not something you
want to get into,
converting thisdesign to cedar strip/epoxy  would make a nice boat.  I'm
working on
one now.
To answer your question about time. A 16 ft strip built canoe takes about
200 hours to build.
You can see traditional examples on my website.
Steve
http://www.geocities.com/new_old_boats/oldboat/index.htm
Quote:

> Good morning:

> I am considering building a canoe during the Fall/Winter seasons.
> Basically it will be used for leisure paddling and bass fishing at
> local lake.

> I have found several websites carrying canoe kits and/or plans. There
> is this company: http://www.geodesicairoliteboats.com in which I have
> my eyes set on their models Snow Shoe 14 and Snow Shoe Explorer 14.
> Have any of you guys built any of those canoes?

> Regarding that source of canoe plans (or any other source that you may
> recommend), how much time and money is involved in building a canoe?
> What level of expertise is needed to accomplish it?

> Thanks a lot for any information that you guys can offer.

> Javier
> Woodbridge, VA

 
 
 

Canoe building: beginner's questions

Post by William R. Wa » Sat, 20 Oct 2001 00:00:35

both the fibreglass over cedar strip and the Dacron over wood frame boats
have a lot of small pieces which makes construction labour intensive. (in
the frame of the Geodesic boat there can be 300 intersection of ribs and
stingers, each of which has to be glued and clamped.) the two the
advantages of the Dacron boats are light weight and low cost. the desinger
figures they should last about 10 years. that and their fragility are
their disadvantages. you have to be careful with them. both are good for
home builders because the high labour content makes them expensive to buy
as a finished product.

you might also consider a canoe made of contoured plywood panels held
together with fibreglass tape and wood glue. The resulting shapes are
quite good. they require less labour. good. You can buy just the plans and
cut the plywood panels out yourself. The only online example I can think
of at the moment is the www.selway-fisher.com website. I hope that's
spelled right.

Quote:

>> Good morning:

>> I am considering building a canoe during the Fall/Winter seasons.
>> Basically it will be used for leisure paddling and bass fishing at
>> local lake.

>> I have found several websites carrying canoe kits and/or plans. There
>> is this company: http://www.geodesicairoliteboats.com in which I have
>> my eyes set on their models Snow Shoe 14 and Snow Shoe Explorer 14.
>> Have any of you guys built any of those canoes?

>> Regarding that source of canoe plans (or any other source that you may
>> recommend), how much time and money is involved in building a canoe?
>> What level of expertise is needed to accomplish it?

>> Thanks a lot for any information that you guys can offer.

>> Javier
>> Woodbridge, VA

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Canoe building: beginner's questions

Post by mark cosgrov » Sat, 20 Oct 2001 07:29:49


hi
 i am currently building a snow shoe 14 which i hope to get done by
Christmas but getting deseent wood in the UK is a problem but just i got the
plans and kit for the show shoe i found a design called the Chippewa which
looks easy and nice boat have a look at www.glen-l.com look for the Chippewa


Quote:
> Those geodesic fabric covered boats are OK.
> A little to fragile for me though.
> Have you thought of an Adirondack Guideboat?
> While the traditional method of building is probably not something you
> want to get into,
> converting thisdesign to cedar strip/epoxy  would make a nice boat.  I'm
> working on
> one now.
> To answer your question about time. A 16 ft strip built canoe takes about
> 200 hours to build.
> You can see traditional examples on my website.
> Steve
> http://www.geocities.com/new_old_boats/oldboat/index.htm


> > Good morning:

> > I am considering building a canoe during the Fall/Winter seasons.
> > Basically it will be used for leisure paddling and bass fishing at
> > local lake.

> > I have found several websites carrying canoe kits and/or plans. There
> > is this company: http://www.geodesicairoliteboats.com in which I have
> > my eyes set on their models Snow Shoe 14 and Snow Shoe Explorer 14.
> > Have any of you guys built any of those canoes?

> > Regarding that source of canoe plans (or any other source that you may
> > recommend), how much time and money is involved in building a canoe?
> > What level of expertise is needed to accomplish it?

> > Thanks a lot for any information that you guys can offer.

> > Javier
> > Woodbridge, VA

 
 
 

Canoe building: beginner's questions

Post by Richard R Ilfe » Sat, 20 Oct 2001 23:11:36

Snow Shoe 14

Stretched to 15' 4" no problem.
Two years in service. Lots of patches, probably
30 or more.  Patching is a five minute job using Stits
Adhesive.  Carry Duct tape for temporary patches
to get home.  UV paint a good idea -- this boat has
been stored outside. If we didn't paddle over oyster
beds at low tide we wouldn't have cut up the hull
as much.  Used West adhesive with flox fill to reduce
critical nature of joint fitting -- has held up fine.

Built for light weight for a person with wrist problems such
that lifting more than 25 pounds is a BIG chore.  Other than
very expensive *** composites hard to imagine
lighter boat -- all boats are a compromise and this has been
a good one for us.


Quote:

>Good morning:

>I am considering building a canoe during the Fall/Winter seasons.
>Basically it will be used for leisure paddling and bass fishing at
>local lake.

>I have found several websites carrying canoe kits and/or plans. There
>is this company: http://SportToday.org/ in which I have
>my eyes set on their models Snow Shoe 14 and Snow Shoe Explorer 14.
>Have any of you guys built any of those canoes?

>Regarding that source of canoe plans (or any other source that you may
>recommend), how much time and money is involved in building a canoe?
>What level of expertise is needed to accomplish it?

>Thanks a lot for any information that you guys can offer.

>Javier
>Woodbridge, VA

 
 
 

Canoe building: beginner's questions

Post by Eric Blumhag » Sun, 21 Oct 2001 03:19:31

I built a Stillwater Boats Sunset over a year and a half (about 190
hours, other projects got in the way) from the kit.  The shell is made
from 4 plywood panels, and goes together pretty easily.  Finishing the
decks takes quite a bit more time, though!  Overall, it's a great
boat, not terribly lightweight (~55 lbs), but it carries two easily.
The total cash outlay is slipping into the mists, but I seem to
remember somehwere around $600.  The kit doesn't come with epoxy or
fiberglass.

I think Stillwater is out on the web somewhere
(http://www.by-the-sea.com/~stillwater)?

Eric


Quote:

> you might also consider a canoe made of contoured plywood panels held
> together with fibreglass tape and wood glue. The resulting shapes are
> quite good. they require less labour. good. You can buy just the plans and
> cut the plywood panels out yourself. The only online example I can think
> of at the moment is the www.selway-fisher.com website. I hope that's
> spelled right.