Opinions of 25' Penn Yan and 25' Trojan

Opinions of 25' Penn Yan and 25' Trojan

Post by John Humphry » Mon, 26 Jun 2000 04:00:00


I looking at 2 boats. One is a 25' Penn Yan tunnel drive with a 454 single
screw. I like the design
and layout of the boat. I've heard that folks either love or hate this
boats. My mechanic considers
them middle-of-the road in terms of quality and says that there are some
simple hull modifications
that can be done to improve performance. This boat has dual stations with an
enclosed head.

The second is a 25 or 26' Trojan. Much different design. Single station with
a 302 single screw. One
thing that puzzles me on this boat is that the***pit is not self bailing.
I'm waiting to hear back from
the seller, but I think that he said the water drains into the bilge and is
pumped out. I'm thinking to
my self that I could just put the drains in myself, but my mechanic said
some boat designs actually
have the floor sloped towards the bow to drain. The seller honestly admits
that this boat isn't fast which
is fine. It almost sounds like this boat can have a hard time getting on
plane.

If you have experience with either or both of these boats, please post or
email me.

Thanks,
    john

 
 
 

Opinions of 25' Penn Yan and 25' Trojan

Post by Tom Rayn » Tue, 27 Jun 2000 04:00:00

John Asks:

Quote:
>One is a 25' Penn Yan tunnel drive with a 454 single
>screw. I like the design
>and layout of the boat....
>If you have experience with either or both of these boats, please post...

John:

Spent some time on a neighbor's 23' Penn Yan. Like you, I liked the layout.
Lots of interior room, engine easy to work on, self-bailing***pit, dual
consoles, flying bridge, enclosed head, galley and table, plenty of storage,
easy to move around and even moor single-handed in a current.

The tunnel drive was nice - drew 18" of water and avoided entanglements most of
the time. Just don't hit any logs end-on.

Can't vouch for the cost of ownership, since I didn't pay for maintenance. As
for quality, I'd agree with the middle-of-the-road remark. There seemed to be
more plastic than teak, and the amount of exposed fiberglass (like the deck)
gave it a kind of toy-like look that I'm sure wooden boat purists would hate.

Hope this helps!

- Tom