Cleaning Up a Hatch Cover

Cleaning Up a Hatch Cover

Post by HarryKraus » Sun, 13 Sep 1998 04:00:00


I built a little fiberglass fishing box with a cutting board for a top and a
hatch cover to put stuff inside it. The hatch cover is one of those Tempress
jobs, rectangular, with a frame and a plastic panel. The panel has a slightly
rough surface.

The panel gets dirty...fish guts, bait remnants, etc., and though I try to clean
it after each use, I never seem to be able to get it sparkling new again. Seems
as if the stains are absorbed.

Tried comet, softscrub, boat soaps. soylent green.

Any ideas?

--

Harry Krause
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Cleaning Up a Hatch Cover

Post by Mart Gree » Sun, 13 Sep 1998 04:00:00

Harry,

I use jeweler's rouge to remove stains from a rough surface
cutting board and a marble counter top, and it works pretty
well on ball point pen ink on Formica--might work on yours.

Mart Green

Quote:

> I built a little fiberglass fishing box with a cutting board for a top and a
> hatch cover to put stuff inside it. The hatch cover is one of those Tempress
> jobs, rectangular, with a frame and a plastic panel. The panel has a slightly
> rough surface.

> The panel gets dirty...fish guts, bait remnants, etc., and though I try to clean
> it after each use, I never seem to be able to get it sparkling new again. Seems
> as if the stains are absorbed.

> Tried comet, softscrub, boat soaps. soylent green.

> Any ideas?

> --

> Harry Krause
> EMAIL from newsgroup? Remove -nospam from return address
> - - - - - - - - - -
> "Bother" said Pooh as he hid Piglet's body with Tigger's.


 
 
 

Cleaning Up a Hatch Cover

Post by Alan Krau » Thu, 17 Sep 1998 04:00:00

Quote:

>Try good old fashioned Clorox. Wash the boat with detergent & water to soften
>the gunk. Then spray on the Clorox and let it sit in the sun a little while.
>Usually you can see the stains just melt away in the sun.  If the gunk is
>thick it may take a second application.

Just FYI -

The bleach does not actually 'clean' the gunk off - it merely bleaches
them white. When I worked at a Deli through college, we had large
plastic food prep areas. At night, we'd hose them all down, scrub them
with detergent, then bleach the stains out and rinse. It worked well!

Alan

 
 
 

Cleaning Up a Hatch Cover

Post by hidd » Thu, 17 Sep 1998 04:00:00

Quote:


>>Try good old fashioned Clorox. Wash the boat with detergent & water to
soften
>>the gunk. Then spray on the Clorox and let it sit in the sun a little
while.
>>Usually you can see the stains just melt away in the sun.  If the gunk is
>>thick it may take a second application.

>Just FYI -

>The bleach does not actually 'clean' the gunk off - it merely bleaches
>them white. When I worked at a Deli through college, we had large
>plastic food prep areas. At night, we'd hose them all down, scrub them
>with detergent, then bleach the stains out and rinse. It worked well!

>Alan

In food service, the bleach is used more as a sanitizer than anything
else...  All food prep surfaces must be sanitized.  Washing with detergent
and hot water is not sufficient...  My stores used bar rinse sanitizer...
Much easier on the hands and smells better too...

Bleach is also used to kill microorganisms...  It's what you would use to
wash down a *** spattered *** scene...

In the case of Harry's hatch cover, I would paint it.  The hatch is
obviously made out of a porous plastic that absorbs fish *** and guts...
Bleach could work, but I don't think it's worth the risk of ruined clothing.

Dennis


 
 
 

Cleaning Up a Hatch Cover

Post by HarryKraus » Thu, 17 Sep 1998 04:00:00

Quote:



> >>Try good old fashioned Clorox. Wash the boat with detergent & water to
> soften
> >>the gunk. Then spray on the Clorox and let it sit in the sun a little
> while.
> >>Usually you can see the stains just melt away in the sun.  If the gunk is
> >>thick it may take a second application.

> >Just FYI -

> >The bleach does not actually 'clean' the gunk off - it merely bleaches
> >them white. When I worked at a Deli through college, we had large
> >plastic food prep areas. At night, we'd hose them all down, scrub them
> >with detergent, then bleach the stains out and rinse. It worked well!

> >Alan

> In food service, the bleach is used more as a sanitizer than anything
> else...  All food prep surfaces must be sanitized.  Washing with detergent
> and hot water is not sufficient...  My stores used bar rinse sanitizer...
> Much easier on the hands and smells better too...

> Bleach is also used to kill microorganisms...  It's what you would use to
> wash down a *** spattered *** scene...

> In the case of Harry's hatch cover, I would paint it.  The hatch is
> obviously made out of a porous plastic that absorbs fish *** and guts...
> Bleach could work, but I don't think it's worth the risk of ruined clothing.

> Dennis



Hmmm. Awlgrip!
--

Harry Krause
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Cleaning Up a Hatch Cover

Post by Alan Krau » Fri, 18 Sep 1998 04:00:00

Quote:

>My stores used bar rinse sanitizer...
>Much easier on the hands and smells better too...

You can probably imagine the number of nights I went home with that
horendous bleach smell still clinging to my hands. Just the thought of
it makes me slightly queezy...

Alan

 
 
 

Cleaning Up a Hatch Cover

Post by HarryKraus » Fri, 18 Sep 1998 04:00:00

Quote:


> >My stores used bar rinse sanitizer...
> >Much easier on the hands and smells better too...

> You can probably imagine the number of nights I went home with that
> horendous bleach smell still clinging to my hands. Just the thought of
> it makes me slightly queezy...

> Alan

I run a Clorox rinse through the baitwells and fishwells. My "fishing" clothes
are so raggy, the splashed on bleach residue makes them look tie-died. Purple
tee-shirts with white and yellow spots...my personal favorite.

--

Harry Krause
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- - - - - - - - - -
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Cleaning Up a Hatch Cover

Post by Ted » Fri, 18 Sep 1998 04:00:00

Quote:

> I built a little fiberglass fishing box with a cutting board for a top and a
> hatch cover to put stuff inside it. The hatch cover is one of those Tempress
> jobs, rectangular, with a frame and a plastic panel. The panel has a slightly
> rough surface.

> The panel gets dirty...fish guts, bait remnants, etc., and though I try to clean
> it after each use, I never seem to be able to get it sparkling new again. Seems
> as if the stains are absorbed.

> Tried comet, softscrub, boat soaps. soylent green.

> Any ideas?

Harry --

You might try one of those Oxalic acid based hull cleaners - test a
little spot in one corner of the cutting board.  I don't know what
effect it'll have on the frame (plastic? Aluminum?) - just a suggestion.

Regards - Ted H

 
 
 

Cleaning Up a Hatch Cover

Post by RMSBUFFA » Sat, 19 Sep 1998 04:00:00

Sounds like the deck on my CC boat.  Everything stains it and deck cleaner
doesn't even clean it.  However, 2 things do work and work very well..

- Clorox clean up contains bleach, but not full strength and it also contains
some knd of detergent.  It probably would harm clothing if you get to rowdy
with it, but I've never had a problem.

- Bathroom tub and tile cleaner.  Most any brand will do.

With either of these, best to apply a little to the surface and let it soak a
few minutes.  It should just wash off then.

Jerry M

 
 
 

Cleaning Up a Hatch Cover

Post by Bill Smotrill » Sat, 19 Sep 1998 04:00:00

Quote:

> Sounds like the deck on my CC boat.  Everything stains it and deck cleaner
> doesn't even clean it.  However, 2 things do work and work very well..

> - Clorox clean up contains bleach, but not full strength and it also contains
> some knd of detergent.  It probably would harm clothing if you get to rowdy
> with it, but I've never had a problem.

> - Bathroom tub and tile cleaner.  Most any brand will do.

> With either of these, best to apply a little to the surface and let it soak a
> few minutes.  It should just wash off then.

> Jerry M

There is an acid based product called FSR; Fiberglass Stain Remover.  It works
very well, consisting of a blue gel that you brush on.  Leave it sit for a few
minutes and rinse.  I used it to remove the brown scum stain from my waterline
when the boat is on the trailer.  I bought mine at West Marine as they're close
to my house.  It is the only stuff I've found that will remove dried *** spots
from Dorado which must have a chemical makeup similar to Super Glue.Bill
 
 
 

Cleaning Up a Hatch Cover

Post by 4PLAnV » Sun, 20 Sep 1998 04:00:00

On my tough cleanup jobs, I've had very good luck using CLOROX Cleanup with
bleach.
It seems to work very well. Also I like the fact that it also disenfects
while it cleans.

Good luck,       Barry

Quote:


>> I built a little fiberglass fishing box with a cutting board for a top
and a
>> hatch cover to put stuff inside it. The hatch cover is one of those
Tempress
>> jobs, rectangular, with a frame and a plastic panel. The panel has a
slightly
>> rough surface.

>> The panel gets dirty...fish guts, bait remnants, etc., and though I try
to clean
>> it after each use, I never seem to be able to get it sparkling new again.
Seems
>> as if the stains are absorbed.

>> Tried comet, softscrub, boat soaps. soylent green.

>> Any ideas?