Outdrives + saltwater? Excessive Maintenance?

Outdrives + saltwater? Excessive Maintenance?

Post by rayporte » Thu, 03 Sep 1998 04:00:00


I now have a 200 hp Johnson non-Ocean Runner on a 20' Stratos.  I am
considering a trade for a '79 Grady White with twin outdrives.  Several
folks are trying to talk me out of it, as they claim that outdrives in
seawater demand lots of maintenance (specifically mentioned are cables and
u-joints).   Any of you sal***er outdrive owners of several years have an
opinion?

Thanks..Ray

 
 
 

Outdrives + saltwater? Excessive Maintenance?

Post by William Park » Fri, 04 Sep 1998 04:00:00

Yes,  but only if we are talking Mercruiser Alpha drives.

In a nutshell,  if you keep the boat in the water make sure your wiring is
correct to reduce corrosion and keep your zincs healthy.  If you keep it on
a trailer make yourself up a double set of flushing "earphones" (i.e. two
phones connected by a piece of 3/4'' PVC of the right length with PVC hose
thread male fittings (home depot) on each end to***into the phones which
will then fit onto both drives simultaneously and with a 3/4" tee in the
middle of the spacer pipe with a female pvc hose thread  attached to***
your garden hose to) and wash the drives and engines out religiously after
each use.  Also rinse the outside of the drives,  lift pistons etc. If you
use your boat a whole lot change your bellows once a year so they never get
a leak in them and so ruin your shift cables,  universal joints and gimbel
bearing.  Grease the various grease fittings regularly (3 minutes)  and make
sure your gearcase oil level stays full and that your oil isn't contaminated
with water.  Sound like a lot?  Maybe so,  maybe not depending upon your
point of view,  but I have used Merc Alphas for twelve years now averaging
over 125 trips per year and am happy enough to never consider going back to
stinking overpriced outboard motors.  If the drives you buy are in good
shape to begin with you should pretty much be able to keep them that way.
If you keep the boat on the trailer much of the maintenance is well within
the capabilities of the average boater and as such you can avoid labor
charges most of the time.  Again, the key is to make sure you aren't buying
a pig in a poke to begin with.

Bill

Quote:

>I now have a 200 hp Johnson non-Ocean Runner on a 20' Stratos.  I am
>considering a trade for a '79 Grady White with twin outdrives.  Several
>folks are trying to talk me out of it, as they claim that outdrives in
>seawater demand lots of maintenance (specifically mentioned are cables and
>u-joints).   Any of you sal***er outdrive owners of several years have an
>opinion?

>Thanks..Ray


 
 
 

Outdrives + saltwater? Excessive Maintenance?

Post by John Hil » Fri, 04 Sep 1998 04:00:00

The rabbit ear flushes do the job. But for 150.00 you can install a hose
connection on the stern and tap directly into the water line inside. If you
have twins you can install a knife valve so that with a flick you can then
flush the second engine.  Use a quick hose connector and it is now no more
effort or time than flushing a jetski. 5 minutes.

On occassion pour some Salt Away down the hose connection....  and
Palmolive dish soap to protect the hoses.

Now you are cooking. If it aint easy. It does not get done. So make it
easy!  The 150.00 will save you on a big maintenance bill down the road and
a lost week or two of boating.  Pay a little now or a lot latter!

John



Quote:
> Yes,  but only if we are talking Mercruiser Alpha drives.

> In a nutshell,  if you keep the boat in the water make sure your wiring
is
> correct to reduce corrosion and keep your zincs healthy.  If you keep it
on
> a trailer make yourself up a double set of flushing "earphones" (i.e. two
> phones connected by a piece of 3/4'' PVC of the right length with PVC
hose
> thread male fittings (home depot) on each end to***into the phones
which
> will then fit onto both drives simultaneously and with a 3/4" tee in the
> middle of the spacer pipe with a female pvc hose thread  attached to
***
> your garden hose to) and wash the drives and engines out religiously
after
> each use.  Also rinse the outside of the drives,  lift pistons etc. If
you
> use your boat a whole lot change your bellows once a year so they never
get
> a leak in them and so ruin your shift cables,  universal joints and
gimbel
> bearing.  Grease the various grease fittings regularly (3 minutes)  and
make
> sure your gearcase oil level stays full and that your oil isn't
contaminated
> with water.  Sound like a lot?  Maybe so,  maybe not depending upon your
> point of view,  but I have used Merc Alphas for twelve years now
averaging
> over 125 trips per year and am happy enough to never consider going back
to
> stinking overpriced outboard motors.  If the drives you buy are in good
> shape to begin with you should pretty much be able to keep them that way.
> If you keep the boat on the trailer much of the maintenance is well
within
> the capabilities of the average boater and as such you can avoid labor
> charges most of the time.  Again, the key is to make sure you aren't
buying
> a pig in a poke to begin with.

> Bill


> >I now have a 200 hp Johnson non-Ocean Runner on a 20' Stratos.  I am
> >considering a trade for a '79 Grady White with twin outdrives.  Several
> >folks are trying to talk me out of it, as they claim that outdrives in
> >seawater demand lots of maintenance (specifically mentioned are cables
and
> >u-joints).   Any of you sal***er outdrive owners of several years have
an
> >opinion?

> >Thanks..Ray


 
 
 

Outdrives + saltwater? Excessive Maintenance?

Post by Twin Bo » Wed, 09 Sep 1998 04:00:00

If you tie into the water line inside the boat on a Merc. Alpha 1, then you
will burn up the water pump in the Outdrive. Be carefull what you tell people!