Southern Yellow Pine

Southern Yellow Pine

Post by David Fa » Tue, 19 Aug 1997 04:00:00


Alan Welbank asked about Southern Yellow Pine.

"Southern Yellow Pine" is a catch all phrase for half a
dozen or so species of pines which grow in the S.E. USA.
Fortuitously, (saves me the bother of listing them seperately)
the woods of southern pines have a lot in common:

They are classed as moderately heavy, moderately hard,
moderately strong, stiff and shock resistant.  The heartwood
is moderately resistant to decay.  They all shrink a lot when
drying but when seasoned are dimensionly sound.  Fastener
withdrawal resistance is excellent and ranks above hemlock,
spruce and Douglas fir.  They average 38 lbs per cubic ft
(593 kg per cubic metre).  My personal experience is that the
wood age hardens well but unless treated is subject to insect
attack and if exposed to the elements decays quickly.  I have
not heard of the wood being used for boat building.  But of
course that doesn't mean that it isn't.  Why don't you 'phone
the Forestry Commission?  They should have many answers
on file or at least be able to point you in the right direction.

Cheers!

Dave Fay.

 
 
 

Southern Yellow Pine

Post by J. Mark Lan » Tue, 19 Aug 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

> Alan Welbank asked about Southern Yellow Pine.

> "Southern Yellow Pine" is a catch all phrase for half a
> dozen or so species of pines which grow in the S.E. USA.
> Fortuitously, (saves me the bother of listing them seperately)
> the woods of southern pines have a lot in common:

> They are classed as moderately heavy, moderately hard,
> moderately strong, stiff and shock resistant.  The heartwood
> is moderately resistant to decay.  They all shrink a lot when
> drying but when seasoned are dimensionly sound.  Fastener
> withdrawal resistance is excellent and ranks above hemlock,
> spruce and Douglas fir.  They average 38 lbs per cubic ft
> (593 kg per cubic metre).  My personal experience is that the
> wood age hardens well but unless treated is subject to insect
> attack and if exposed to the elements decays quickly.  I have
> not heard of the wood being used for boat building.  But of
> course that doesn't mean that it isn't.  Why don't you 'phone
> the Forestry Commission?  They should have many answers
> on file or at least be able to point you in the right direction.

> Cheers!

> Dave Fay.

Long-leaf yellow pine is, I believe, a different story, although I am
not an expert.  Much of my old Alden yawl was built with this very nice
wood.  It's pretty, and pretty strong.
Mark Lane

 
 
 

Southern Yellow Pine

Post by Nebar » Wed, 20 Aug 1997 04:00:00

Quote:
>Long-leaf yellow pine is, I believe, a different story, although I am
>not an expert.  
>  It's pretty, and pretty strong.
>Mark Lane

Yes Mark,

And you might have added, pretty impossible to get these days.
Eric
Grampian 31 classic
Tracy's Landing, MD

 
 
 

Southern Yellow Pine

Post by craig o'donne » Thu, 21 Aug 1997 04:00:00


 >  Alan Welbank asked about Southern Yellow Pine.
 >  
 >  "Southern Yellow Pine" is a catch all phrase for half a
 >  dozen or so species of pines which grow in the S.E. USA.
 >  Fortuitously, (saves me the bother of listing them seperately)
 >  the woods of southern pines have a lot in common:

 >  (593 kg per cubic metre).  My personal experience is that the
 >  wood age hardens well but unless treated is subject to insect
 >  attack and if exposed to the elements decays quickly.  I have
 >  not heard of the wood being used for boat building.  But of
 >  course that doesn't mean that it isn't.  

It surely has been although no one would say it's a first choice (no pun
intended). Chesapeake workboats were often built of loblolly pine (surely
an SYP variety) in the interests of economy. Of course they also did not
last long. I'd suspect the same was true of North Carolina sharpies, etc.,
etc.

-- COD
   craig o'donnell             |||  author of Cool Mac Sounds

   The Proa FAQ    
      <http://www.***-dyne.com/~jkohnen/proafaq.html>
   The Cheap Pages
      <http://SportToday.org/

 
 
 

Southern Yellow Pine

Post by Richard Barne » Fri, 22 Aug 1997 04:00:00

Older "heart" Southern Yellow Pine(probably slash or Loblolly , but maybe
some Long leaf) may be found in old mill timbers and flooring, which can be
resawn if you can find a mill willing to saw through all the hidden
fasteners. The holes left may be trouble for planking in boat construction.

 A source of this wood may be found occasionally in the classifieds of
magazines like "Fine Woodworking"

Richard Barnes
Skwaller Holler Sawmill



Quote:

> Yes Mark,

> And you might have added, pretty impossible to get these days.
> Eric
> Grampian 31 classic
> Tracy's Landing, MD

 
 
 

Southern Yellow Pine

Post by andic » Fri, 22 Aug 1997 04:00:00



Quote:
>  >  Alan Welbank asked about Southern Yellow Pine.
>  I have
>  >  not heard of the wood being used for boat building.  But of
>  >  course that doesn't mean that it isn't.  

> It surely has been although no one would say it's a first choice (no pun
> intended). >
> -- COD
>    craig

I get the impressiong from WoodenBoat that SYP is a choice wood for
planking and decking, but that decent stock is very hard to fing these
days.  I'm under the impression that at least the old stuff is quite rot
resistant.
 
 
 

Southern Yellow Pine

Post by C. E. Whit » Tue, 26 Aug 1997 04:00:00

Quote:


> I get the impressiong from WoodenBoat that SYP is a choice wood for
> planking and decking, but that decent stock is very hard to fing these
> days.  I'm under the impression that at least the old stuff is quite > rot resistant.

I thought either Bald Cypress or Juniper (Atlantic White Ceader) were
considered excellent woods for building a boat. We have some older
(unused) cypress boards in storage. I used some of them to build a
picnic table in 1970. A friend used it until last year. It finally
failed because he used it as his work table for repairing car parts. The
solvents he used seemed to cause the wood to fall apart (after 25
years). We still have Bald Cypress tress on our farm , so I assume the
wood is still available if you look hard enough.
 
 
 

Southern Yellow Pine

Post by JKlopm » Wed, 03 Sep 1997 04:00:00

If you can get good clear sections of true southern
/pitch/yellow/longleaf, my recommendation is to buy as much as you can! It
is a superb building material. It makes extremely rugged planking - most
N.G. Herreshoff boats are spec'd for Southern yellow single plank below the
waterline and double plank above. Many commercial boats were built with it.
Pitch pine was always favored for centerboard stock as it does not shrink
or swell much. The wood is difficult to mill in quantity because it is so
gimmy with sap. Yet this is what makes it stable and rot resistant. You'll
know the right stuf if ithas a strong scent of turpentine and gums up a saw
blade. It looks lovely varnished and will hold fasteners reasonably well.

Jonathan K. Klopman
Marine Surveyor, NAMS-CMS