BOAT/U.S. Newswire: Diesel Fuel Tax Regulations

BOAT/U.S. Newswire: Diesel Fuel Tax Regulations

Post by BOAT » Thu, 31 Mar 1994 23:32:01


From the BOAT/U.S. Newswire, 3/30/94: A spokesman for the nation's largest
organization of recreational boaters has told the Internal Revenue Service
(IRS) that regulations issued by the agency to collect a 20.1 cents per gallon
federal tax on diesel fuel used only by recreational boats are responsible for
growing fuel shortages that pose a serious threat to boating safety.

The regulations require recreational boaters to buy clear, or "taxed" diesel
fuel and allow commercial boat operators to purchase blue-dyed, or "non-taxed"
fuel. The effect of the regulations is to force retailers with only one tank
and pump to choose between selling clear fuel to recreational boaters or
blue-dyed fuel to commercial vessels. Since commercial vessels use much more
diesel fuel, retailers are choosing to service only these customers.

Testifying at an IRS hearing in Washington, DC on March 22, Michael Sciulla,
Vice President of Government Affairs for 485,000-member BOAT/U.S. (Boat Owners
Association of The United States) said that even though the recreational
boating season has not yet begun in most parts of the country, BOAT/U.S. has
already received numerous reports from boaters that clear fuel is either
difficult to obtain or unavailable. "From New England to Florida, to the Gulf
Coast and California, recreational boat owners needing diesel fuel have
actually been turned away by some fuel retailers," Sciulla said. "This is not
simply a matter of inconvenience. It is a major marine safety issue."

On the nation's highways, diesel fuel is widely available, but diesel fuel
pumps on the waterways may be located hours, if not days, apart. "The owner of
a truck or automobile running out of diesel fuel may lose some time. The
skipper of a boat running out of fuel in bad weather conditions or at night can
lose his life," Sciulla said. "The government must find a way to resolve this
matter immediately, before the boating season begins in earnest."

BOAT/U.S. believes the simplest solution to the problem would be to allow a
marine fuel retailer to sell any type of fuel to a recreational boat owner. If
"untaxed" blue-dyed fuel is sold, the retailer would collect the appropriate
tax from the recreational boater and turn it over to the IRS.

BOAT/U.S. would like to hear from boaters who have experienced difficulty
obtaining diesel fuel due to the IRS regulations. Please be as specific as

 
 
 

BOAT/U.S. Newswire: Diesel Fuel Tax Regulations

Post by Roy Smi » Sat, 02 Apr 1994 11:10:27

Quote:

> "The owner of a truck or automobile running out of diesel fuel may lose
> some time. The skipper of a boat running out of fuel in bad weather
> conditions or at night can lose his life,"

        Feh.  Now, imagine what the owner of a plane does when his engine
dies in mid-flight becuase he put the wrong fuel in it.  Why do I mention
this on rec.boats?  Well, it seems when the Dept of Commerce decided to dye
diesel fuel blue, they didn't speak to the FAA, and this is causing a bit of
a problem.

        You see, the various types of aircraft fuel are all dyed different
colors to ensure proper identification and prevent accidental misfueling
with the wrong fuel.  The most common type of aviation gasoline use in small
planes, 100LL (100 octane low-lead) is dyed, you guessed it, blue.  The same
color they are now dying diesel fuel.  The FAA is not happy about this.
Seeing as how the plane folks had dibs on blue fuel before Commerce got into
the act, I suspect something will happen eventually to change the dying of
diesel fuel.  In case anybody is wondering, red and green are spoken for
already as well.

        The starboard hand knows not what the port hand is doing...
--

Hippocrates Project, Department of Microbiology, Coles 202
NYU School of Medicine, 550 First Avenue, New York, NY 10016
"This never happened to Bart Simpson."

 
 
 

BOAT/U.S. Newswire: Diesel Fuel Tax Regulations

Post by Rod Mc Inn » Wed, 06 Apr 1994 01:23:45

Quote:


>> "The owner of a truck or automobile running out of diesel fuel may lose
>> some time. The skipper of a boat running out of fuel in bad weather
>> conditions or at night can lose his life,"

>    Feh.  Now, imagine what the owner of a plane does when his engine
>dies in mid-flight becuase he put the wrong fuel in it.  Why do I mention
>this on rec.boats?  Well, it seems when the Dept of Commerce decided to dye
>diesel fuel blue, they didn't speak to the FAA, and this is causing a bit of
>a problem.

>    You see, the various types of aircraft fuel are all dyed different
>colors to ensure proper identification and prevent accidental misfueling
>with the wrong fuel.  The most common type of aviation gasoline use in small
>planes, 100LL (100 octane low-lead) is dyed, you guessed it, blue.  The same
>color they are now dying diesel fuel.  The FAA is not happy about this.
>Seeing as how the plane folks had dibs on blue fuel before Commerce got into
>the act, I suspect something will happen eventually to change the dying of
>diesel fuel.  In case anybody is wondering, red and green are spoken for
>already as well.

>    The starboard hand knows not what the port hand is doing...
>--


  I am not a pilot, but I ave flown with friends many times.  So now I
am curious;  Just how would diesel fuel make it into a tank of an
airplane?

  I can imagin jet fuel and gas getting swapped.  But last time I
pulled up to a fuel pump at an airport, diesel was not an option.  Why
on earth would anybody place a diesel pump anywhere that a plane could
use it?

        Rod McInnis

 
 
 

BOAT/U.S. Newswire: Diesel Fuel Tax Regulations

Post by Greg Bullou » Wed, 06 Apr 1994 04:52:03


Quote:

>  I am not a pilot, but I ave flown with friends many times.  So now I
>am curious;  Just how would diesel fuel make it into a tank of an
>airplane?

>  I can imagin jet fuel and gas getting swapped.  But last time I
>pulled up to a fuel pump at an airport, diesel was not an option.  Why
>on earth would anybody place a diesel pump anywhere that a plane could
>use it?

It gets into the pump somehow. Yes, in a tank truck which is filled at
a fuel depot by a human being.

And sometimes it goes right from a small tank truck (which is fueled
at a depot by a human being) into the gas tank of the airplane.

To make things worse, some airports now provide auto gas, which adds
to the possible confusion, and the possibility that at least one tank
truck may be*** around where the diesel is pumped, then go out
to the airport.

So, the deal is, that as a pilot you're supposed to be able to look
down into the fuel tank (pretty easy on most airplanes) and see what
color the stuff is against the innards of the tank. Failing that, the
fuel you drain out into the fuel sampler at the time you're supposed
to be emptying the sumps of water should be the color of choice (red,
green, blue, or purple).

Now, presumably you'd have to be pretty nose-deaf to not tell that
the stuff you got on your hands while doing this was diesel, not
gasoline. But that's not the point. Pilots are trained that, "if
you're looking for 100LL, and what you see in the tank is blue,
you've got 'the right stuff.'" And when you switch to that tank
because you need it to stay up in the air, it's going to work.

When something else starts to come from the fuel depot with the same
coloration, this guarantee goes out the window.

Greg