Chesapeake Bay Sailing

Chesapeake Bay Sailing

Post by Chief Sco » Sat, 23 Jul 1994 13:25:19


Can anybody tell me how sailing on the Chesapeake is ?  I've sailing in
the Gulf of Mexico before, but never in the Chesapeake, where iI live.  I
want to buy a small HobieCat.... maybe 16-18 ft.  I wan't to know about
how much to expect to pay for one.  Also, when is jelly fish season on
the Chesapeake?  I got stung by one once.... and after reeling in pain,
decided that I would never go in the water when there was even a smidgen
of a chance of being stung.

Thanks!

 
 
 

Chesapeake Bay Sailing

Post by Michael B. Lai » Sat, 23 Jul 1994 21:13:32

Quote:


>Subject: Chesapeake Bay Sailing
>Date: 22 Jul 1994 04:25:19 GMT
>Can anybody tell me how sailing on the Chesapeake is ?  I've sailing in
>the Gulf of Mexico before, but never in the Chesapeake, where iI live.  I
>want to buy a small HobieCat.... maybe 16-18 ft.  I wan't to know about
>how much to expect to pay for one.  Also, when is jelly fish season on
>the Chesapeake?  I got stung by one once.... and after reeling in pain,
>decided that I would never go in the water when there was even a smidgen
>of a chance of being stung.

>Thanks!

First, where in the Chesapeake will you be sailing?  The bay is several
hundred miles long and conditions vary considerably over it.  In general
the bay is very forgiving of groundings being mostly a mud bottom.  Waves
can be short and choppy during heavy winds, and thunderstorms come up
pretty quickly along the entire length.  Winds of 135 mph have been
noted in some of these storms.  Jelly fish season should have started by
now, and will continue untill the water cools in the fall.  However in the
northern part of the bay, and particularly up some of the rivers the water
is fresh enough that the jelly fish stay away.  By the way, any clothing
will protect you from their stings as will vasaline or even margarine.

From my experience the lower part of the bay is open and fairly free of
other sailboats.  North of the Patuxant the density begins to increase
untill you get up to Annapolis, where on a good day you can walk to
shore over the boats out there :).  You could probably spend most of
your life exploring the shores of the Bay and still miss a few good
gunkholes.

Mike Laing

 
 
 

Chesapeake Bay Sailing

Post by Walter Wils » Wed, 27 Jul 1994 02:27:06

Quote:

> how much to expect to pay for one.  Also, when is jelly fish season on
> the Chesapeake?  I got stung by one once.... and after reeling in pain,
> decided that I would never go in the water when there was even a smidgen
> of a chance of being stung.

Check out the current issue of National Geographic if you
want to know what REAL jellyfish stings are like-- they have
an article about Killer jellyfish from north coast of Austrailia.

Also, don't be a wimp -- just wear some pantyhose!

--


  The opinions expressed here are my own.    

 
 
 

Chesapeake Bay Sailing

Post by ma.. » Thu, 28 Jul 1994 04:29:23


Quote:
>Can anybody tell me how sailing on the Chesapeake is ?

Ditto.

I'll be visiting Cheaspeak Bay in early October on the way to Annapolis.
We are delivering a cat from South Africa to the boat show. Can anyone
suggest places that are worth seeing on the way up Cheasapeak? What's
happenin' in Annapolis?

Ciao
Broderick

 
 
 

Chesapeake Bay Sailing

Post by George You » Thu, 28 Jul 1994 21:37:29

Written from Seaford, VA, near Yorktown a la the battlefield.

If you appreciate hostory and museums, there is much in Hampton Roads:
the Jamestown Settlement with replicas of their three ships, Colonial
Williamsburg (the first capital of hte U.S.), Yorktown battlefields,
Mariners Museum and ***ia Air and Space Museum, a brand new museum -
Nauticus- which is getting rave reviews from the local press.  The latter
two are within walking distance of anchorages/docks (Hampton and Norfolk
respectively); the others within a 20 mile driving distance.

What else is "worth seeing".  Sailing on the southern bay (I've no
experience in the northern parts) as others have said, is great in the
fall.  There are some fine anchorages we locals enjoy in the many
"rivers" and "creeks" (they are really estuaries) on the western side of
the Bay. Similar settings exist on the eastern side of the bay above the
Potomac River.  If you don't just 'sail through to Annapolis', you might
enjoy these.


: >Can anybody tell me how sailing on the Chesapeake is ?

: Ditto.

: I'll be visiting Cheaspeak Bay in early October on the way to Annapolis.
: We are delivering a cat from South Africa to the boat show. Can anyone
: suggest places that are worth seeing on the way up Cheasapeak? What's
: happenin' in Annapolis?

: Ciao
: Broderick

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Chesapeake Bay Sailing

Post by Dick Merrym » Sun, 31 Jul 1994 12:29:34

: ...Colonial Williamsburg (the first capital of the U.S.)...
                            ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Now where in the world did you ever get such an idea as that??  
Williamsburg was certainly a significant colonial capital, but capital
of the U.S.?  I don't think so!

                                -Dick-

 
 
 

Chesapeake Bay Sailing

Post by Al Woott » Sun, 31 Jul 1994 01:45:46


   >Can anybody tell me how sailing on the Chesapeake is ?

   Ditto.

   I'll be visiting Cheaspeak Bay in early October on the way to Annapolis.
   We are delivering a cat from South Africa to the boat show. Can anyone
   suggest places that are worth seeing on the way up Cheasapeak? What's
   happenin' in Annapolis?

Waterside in Norfolk is glitzy and buzzing with activity in the center of
a busy relatively cosmopolitan city with a large naval base.  Across Hampton
Roads, where the James and Elizabeth Rivers meet the Bay, is Hampton and
Newport News, with Jamestown, site of the first permanent English settlement
in the US, a bit further up the James.

Up the York River lies Yorktown, site of the British defeat in the Revolutionary
War, and West Point, formerly Powhatan's capital, now home to a large paper
mill.  Crab festival second weekend of October.

Urbanna, 16 miles up the Rappahannock, was founded in 1680 as a wayport on
the route up the Bay, and remains a charming town.  Crowds of 100,000 or
so the first weekend in Nov for the Oyster Festival.  Deltaville, at the mouth
of the Rappahannock, is my home port, and teems with acitivity -- sort of
***ia's answer to Annapolis, IMHO.  Across the Bay, Onancock is the
next in the series of wayports, perhaps even more charming than Urbanna.

Tangier and Smith Islands preserve a way of life long gone in most other
haunts along the Chesapeake.  The natives speak their own dialect.  

I grew up along the Nanticoke and Wicomico Rivers of the Eastern Shore of
Maryland.  Neither has changed much in the past century, and both offer
lots of gunkholes and October birdwatching.  The Potomac enters the Bay from
the West in the vast expanse of open water between Smith Point, Va and St.
Mary's, Maryland's oldest city.  Watch out for storms here,

Back to the western shore, Solomon's Island is calming down by October, but
remains a charming boating center at the mouth of the Patuxent River.  
Across the bay to the Choptank (the western shore from Solomon's north is
dominated by Calvert Cliffs) visit Tilghman's Island, another isolated
venue, somewhat more accessible to the rest of civilization than Smith or
Tangier Islands.  A short hop across the Bay again and one is in Annapolis
which becomes pretty much a zoo during the boat show, IMHO, but is one of
the best smaller towns on the Bay.

Clear skies,
Al
Al Wootten, Slacktide, Sturgeon Creek at the Rappahannock
Deltaville, ***ia              (804)776-6369

--
 Alwyn  Wootten  

 
 
 

Chesapeake Bay Sailing

Post by Robert Cuni » Mon, 01 Aug 1994 12:01:32

Quote:

>Check out the current issue of National Geographic if you
>want to know what REAL jellyfish stings are like-- they have
>an article about Killer jellyfish from north coast of Austrailia.

>Also, don't be a wimp -- just wear some pantyhose!

Pantyhose?  Does this work?  What about the upper body?  A body stocking?

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Chesapeake Bay Sailing

Post by Walter Wils » Wed, 03 Aug 1994 06:12:43

Quote:

> Pantyhose?  Does this work?  What about the upper body?  A body stocking?

Yes, it works. body stockings would probably work.
You can also cut the crotch out of a pair and stick
your head through that hole, with arms out the legs.

And remember, "elegance is in the eye of the beholder"

--


  The opinions expressed here are my own.    

 
 
 

Chesapeake Bay Sailing

Post by Rick Emers » Tue, 02 Aug 1994 14:05:00


DI> Newsgroup: rec.boats

DI> Organization: Express Access Online Communications, Greenbelt, MD USA
DI>

DI>
DI> : ...Colonial Williamsburg (the first capital of the U.S.)...
DI>                             ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
DI>
DI> Now where in the world did you ever get such an idea as that??  
DI> Williamsburg was certainly a significant colonial capital, but capital
DI> of the U.S.?  I don't think so!
DI>
DI>     -Dick-
DI>

As a resident of the Philadelphia environs, maybe I should point out
the Continental Congress (Congreff?  <g>) met in town on occasion...?

Rick
...
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