Bow eye placement- glass hull cruiser.

Bow eye placement- glass hull cruiser.

Post by Donn » Sat, 10 Jul 2004 00:29:13


Hi folks,

Been a while, I'm restoring my '74 Trojan Sea Raider 25'.

www.picturetrail.com/sixbennetts

http://thebayguide.com/rec.boats/donny_bennett.html

I've come to the point where I have to install a bow eye. The boat
fits the trailer perfectly now after a little bunk adjustment. The
transom meets the end of the rear bunks perfectly. The front bunks
support either side of the keel up from.

At the front, the winch tower roller, (single), meets the point of the
bow about a foot above the water line. The winch cable is under-wound
on the spool, meaning it comes out underneath, and under the roller.

In relation to where the roller contacts the bow point, where should I
drill for the bow eye, and why? My common sense tells me it should be
below so that as the rear of the boat lifts when launching, the eye
won't get caught on the roller. If so, how far?

Thanks folks!

Donny

 
 
 

Bow eye placement- glass hull cruiser.

Post by Donn » Sun, 11 Jul 2004 15:45:39

Hi folks,

Been a while, I'm restoring my '74 Trojan Sea Raider 25'.

www.picturetrail.com/sixbennetts

http://thebayguide.com/rec.boats/donny_bennett.html

I've come to the point where I have to install a bow eye. The boat
fits the trailer perfectly now after a little bunk adjustment. The
transom meets the end of the rear bunks perfectly. The front bunks
support either side of the keel up from.

At the front, the winch tower roller, (single), meets the point of the
bow about a foot above the water line. The winch cable is under-wound
on the spool, meaning it comes out underneath, and under the roller.

In relation to where the roller contacts the bow point, where should I
drill for the bow eye, and why? My common sense tells me it should be
below so that as the rear of the boat lifts when launching, the eye
won't get caught on the roller. If so, how far?

Thanks folks!

Donny

 
 
 

Bow eye placement- glass hull cruiser.

Post by Ron Whit » Sun, 11 Jul 2004 18:32:15

The bow eye should , IMHO, be below the bow roller. When fully winched up
the eye should be using the tower roller as a stop so the eye should be
installed with that in mind. If there is an adjustment raise the roller so
your eye will be further above the waterline. The reason for this placement,
the boat needs a stop to keep it from creeping forward while towing.Also
winching the eye tight up against the  roller keeps the boat and trailer
from bouncing around. A nylon strap instead of a cable is a good idea too.

--
Ron White
Boat building web address is
www.concentric.net/~knotreel

 
 
 

Bow eye placement- glass hull cruiser.

Post by Jeeper » Mon, 12 Jul 2004 03:02:54


Quote:

> Hi folks,

> Been a while, I'm restoring my '74 Trojan Sea Raider 25'.

> www.picturetrail.com/sixbennetts

> http://thebayguide.com/rec.boats/donny_bennett.html

> I've come to the point where I have to install a bow eye. The boat
> fits the trailer perfectly now after a little bunk adjustment. The
> transom meets the end of the rear bunks perfectly. The front bunks
> support either side of the keel up from.

> At the front, the winch tower roller, (single), meets the point of the
> bow about a foot above the water line. The winch cable is under-wound
> on the spool, meaning it comes out underneath, and under the roller.

> In relation to where the roller contacts the bow point, where should I
> drill for the bow eye, and why? My common sense tells me it should be
> below so that as the rear of the boat lifts when launching, the eye
> won't get caught on the roller. If so, how far?

> Thanks folks!

> Donny

I'm not much help, but my bow eye is above the bow roller and so when I
launch, the eye always catches on the roller and has to be lifted off.
Guess I should do something about that...

--
It's no good unless it makes your eyes water.

 
 
 

Bow eye placement- glass hull cruiser.

Post by Brian » Tue, 13 Jul 2004 03:11:25

Ideally, the bow eye lands just below the bow roller on the trailer, and the
winch pulls the bow eye to this point.  The boat should be sitting on the
forward fairbody roller (f'w'd' keel) and if anything, the winch should
slightly tend towards lifting the bow as it pulls tight against the bow
roller (but should not 'carry' the boat.)  Most bow eyes are a little above
the waterline and you adjust the trailer to fit the boat, not vice versa.
You will not 'catch' the bow eye on the roller when launching because long
before the boat floats off or tips off the back end of the trailer, it will
have moved back a little and the bow eye clears everything.  Good luck.

Brian D

--
http://www.advantagecomposites.com/tongass  --  My 22' Tolman Skiff project

.

Quote:
> Hi folks,

> Been a while, I'm restoring my '74 Trojan Sea Raider 25'.

> www.picturetrail.com/sixbennetts

> http://thebayguide.com/rec.boats/donny_bennett.html

> I've come to the point where I have to install a bow eye. The boat
> fits the trailer perfectly now after a little bunk adjustment. The
> transom meets the end of the rear bunks perfectly. The front bunks
> support either side of the keel up from.

> At the front, the winch tower roller, (single), meets the point of the
> bow about a foot above the water line. The winch cable is under-wound
> on the spool, meaning it comes out underneath, and under the roller.

> In relation to where the roller contacts the bow point, where should I
> drill for the bow eye, and why? My common sense tells me it should be
> below so that as the rear of the boat lifts when launching, the eye
> won't get caught on the roller. If so, how far?

> Thanks folks!

> Donny

 
 
 

Bow eye placement- glass hull cruiser.

Post by Terry Sprag » Fri, 06 Aug 2004 05:58:05

Quote:

> The bow eye should , IMHO, be below the bow roller. When fully winched up
> the eye should be using the tower roller as a stop so the eye should be
> installed with that in mind. If there is an adjustment raise the roller so
> your eye will be further above the waterline. The reason for this placement,
> the boat needs a stop to keep it from creeping forward while towing.Also
> winching the eye tight up against the  roller keeps the boat and trailer
> from bouncing around. A nylon strap instead of a cable is a good idea too.

The bow eye should be placed so it cannot interfere with the dock if
you should inadvertently ride up on it during docking.

Don't ask why I feel this way;-) Repairing damage from such a
misadventure is a big pain.  With no bow eye, there is little to
notice after such a stunt.

A bridle from on deck, hung over the bow, would be best.