Dinghy Advice: Portabote 8 or Walker Bay 8

Dinghy Advice: Portabote 8 or Walker Bay 8

Post by Spamfreed » Tue, 04 Feb 2003 23:59:14


hello again all, and first off I would like to say thanks.  After returning
fromt he Strictly Sail show in Chicago, I have seen in person some of the
product advice given here )from some of you) has been accurate and helpful.

I have a real quandry, and it plagues many sailors.  Dinghies.  I have a 36
cruising sailboat ont he Great Lakes and I need to get a better dinghy.
Choosing between a roll up inflatable (of which I already own 2, a 8 ' Zodiac
and a 12'Avon and I have never put these on board or towed them, ther are in my
garage), a plasitc injection molded beat er (which seems to be a decent
alternative) or the portabote (which I never rode in or know of anybody that
has).  

My goal is to have a simple dinghy that is functional, tows easily and reliably
and can be put on deck in foul times.  I prefer to keep thing s simple and row
it, but I do have a small cruise N carry (1.5 hp) as well.   Seem I may just
prefer to get both to have the right tool for the job.   BUT ,the Walker Bay 8
has my attention right now.   Any usefull feedback and advice on this before i
go out and throw $$ away?...cheers, Jeff

Oh and since sapmmers suck, please reply to the newsgroup.  thanks

 
 
 

Dinghy Advice: Portabote 8 or Walker Bay 8

Post by r.. » Wed, 05 Feb 2003 01:38:11


Quote:

>I have a real quandry, and it plagues many sailors.  Dinghies.  I have a 36
>cruising sailboat ont he Great Lakes and I need to get a better dinghy.
>Choosing between a roll up inflatable (of which I already own 2, a 8 ' Zodiac
>and a 12'Avon and I have never put these on board or towed them, ther are in my
>garage),

You don't say why you don't use the Zodiac or the Avon. Either would
work well for the Great Lakes as a simple means of getting to and from
the shore from an anchorage, particularly with a 30 lb. motor. Both
can be towed or rolled up and put in a lazarette (OK, the eight-footer
wins here). Have you considered davits? Plenty of people use them and
the weight off the stern isn't too bad on a 36 footer. An alternative
is a davit pole and bridle for first the *** boat and then the
engine (it's safer to lower the engine, even a light one.)

a plasitc injection molded beat er (which seems to be a decent

Quote:
>alternative) or the portabote (which I never rode in or know of anybody that
>has).  

Lots of people love the Portabote for its simplicity, ease of stowage
and ability to plane with a small motor. It can be rowed, powered or
even sailed with an optional rig. Other people find it ugly and/or too
weird to set up and take down, although it only takes (I'm told) 15
minutes, which is probably less time than it takes to inflate a
Zodiac-style tender.
Quote:

>My goal is to have a simple dinghy that is functional, tows easily and reliably
>and can be put on deck in foul times.  I prefer to keep thing s simple and row
>it, but I do have a small cruise N carry (1.5 hp) as well.   Seem I may just
>prefer to get both to have the right tool for the job.   BUT ,the Walker Bay 8
>has my attention right now.   Any usefull feedback and advice on this before i
>go out and throw $$ away?...cheers, Jeff

A hard dinghy is fine and reliable, but can't be collapsed and is
often heavy for its size. It is the best choice for hauling cargo to
and from shore, and the best choice for the dedicated rower. They also
tow well. But unless I anchored out consistantly, I think a roll-up
inflatable or a nesting/folding boat is a better idea for you. Again,
davits would cost less for the existing boat(s) than a new hard
dinghy.

Personally, I have a 10' Zodiac RIB which I tow behind my 33.5'
cruiser. Being an RIB, it tracks well in the water and I rarely remove
the 10 HP 4-stroke on the back (yes, I can easily plane at 18-20 knots
in it). It's a vessel in its own right (I carry nav lights, etc.) and
is great for exploring up rivers and playing around it on days when
the air is too light for decent sailing. And it carries half a ton of
cargo, if needed. Best of all compromises for me, here in Toronto.

Hope this helps,
R.

 
 
 

Dinghy Advice: Portabote 8 or Walker Bay 8

Post by jv » Wed, 05 Feb 2003 02:09:53

Hi,
   Although my Walker Bay dinghy is for sale as I have just ordered a
new inflatable, I really
enjoyed playing with it.  It tows as light as my inflatable, seems very
stable and sails really well.
They don't hold a ton of weight but there is lots of freeboard to play with.
I would buy another one anytime.  Mine is for sale on the west coast of
Canada at $650USD
complete.  It is located in Victoria Canada.

I have tried almost every type of dinghy there is and you could do a lot
worse than a Walker Bay.

Good luck with whatever you decide to get.   cheers john vye
REMOVE NOSPAM IN REPLY

Quote:


> >I have a real quandry, and it plagues many sailors.  Dinghies.  I have a 36
> >cruising sailboat ont he Great Lakes and I need to get a better dinghy.
> >Choosing between a roll up inflatable (of which I already own 2, a 8 ' Zodiac
> >and a 12'Avon and I have never put these on board or towed them, ther are in my
> >garage),

> You don't say why you don't use the Zodiac or the Avon. Either would
> work well for the Great Lakes as a simple means of getting to and from
> the shore from an anchorage, particularly with a 30 lb. motor. Both
> can be towed or rolled up and put in a lazarette (OK, the eight-footer
> wins here). Have you considered davits? Plenty of people use them and
> the weight off the stern isn't too bad on a 36 footer. An alternative
> is a davit pole and bridle for first the *** boat and then the
> engine (it's safer to lower the engine, even a light one.)

> a plasitc injection molded beat er (which seems to be a decent
> >alternative) or the portabote (which I never rode in or know of anybody that
> >has).

> Lots of people love the Portabote for its simplicity, ease of stowage
> and ability to plane with a small motor. It can be rowed, powered or
> even sailed with an optional rig. Other people find it ugly and/or too
> weird to set up and take down, although it only takes (I'm told) 15
> minutes, which is probably less time than it takes to inflate a
> Zodiac-style tender.

> >My goal is to have a simple dinghy that is functional, tows easily and reliably
> >and can be put on deck in foul times.  I prefer to keep thing s simple and row
> >it, but I do have a small cruise N carry (1.5 hp) as well.   Seem I may just
> >prefer to get both to have the right tool for the job.   BUT ,the Walker Bay 8
> >has my attention right now.   Any usefull feedback and advice on this before i
> >go out and throw $$ away?...cheers, Jeff

> A hard dinghy is fine and reliable, but can't be collapsed and is
> often heavy for its size. It is the best choice for hauling cargo to
> and from shore, and the best choice for the dedicated rower. They also
> tow well. But unless I anchored out consistantly, I think a roll-up
> inflatable or a nesting/folding boat is a better idea for you. Again,
> davits would cost less for the existing boat(s) than a new hard
> dinghy.

> Personally, I have a 10' Zodiac RIB which I tow behind my 33.5'
> cruiser. Being an RIB, it tracks well in the water and I rarely remove
> the 10 HP 4-stroke on the back (yes, I can easily plane at 18-20 knots
> in it). It's a vessel in its own right (I carry nav lights, etc.) and
> is great for exploring up rivers and playing around it on days when
> the air is too light for decent sailing. And it carries half a ton of
> cargo, if needed. Best of all compromises for me, here in Toronto.

> Hope this helps,
> R.


 
 
 

Dinghy Advice: Portabote 8 or Walker Bay 8

Post by EJBleendreeb » Wed, 05 Feb 2003 04:58:49

Quote:

> the Walker Bay 8
> has my attention right now.   Any usefull feedback and advice on this

We thought the Walker Bay 8 small.  We went for the 10, and are more
and more glad of our decision all the time.  You can find a review of
the Walker Bay 10 on our Web site at:

http://www.casualsailor.com/Dinghies.shtml

and -- if you're interested in davits to carry it --

http://www.casualsailor.com/ThisOldMotorYacht15.shtml

E.J. Bleendreeble
http://www.casualsailor.com

 
 
 

Dinghy Advice: Portabote 8 or Walker Bay 8

Post by Randy Dev » Wed, 05 Feb 2003 05:47:44


Quote:


>Lots of people love the Portabote for its simplicity, ease of stowage
>and ability to plane with a small motor. It can be rowed, powered or
>even sailed with an optional rig. Other people find it ugly and/or too
>weird to set up and take down, although it only takes (I'm told) 15
>minutes, which is probably less time than it takes to inflate a
>Zodiac-style tender.

I have the 8 foot Portabote for my F-31 trimaran.  I only row it and it
rows well enough in anchorages.  A friend borrowed it long enough to try
his Honda 4 stroke 2 HP motor.  It didn't plane but it tracked well and
zipped along at 6 knots or so.  It is limited to a 5 HP motor by Coast
Guard standards and with that, can get up on a plane according to Practical
Sailor.

The 8 foot model is limited to 3 ***s and is cozy with 2 ***s and
supplies.  Also, it is tippy and takes some getting used to after you have
used a RIB or something similar.

It is easy enough to assemble/disassemble on our nets and lift out of the
water that I prefer to fold it and place it on our nets for traveling.  
I towed it once in calm conditions and it towed just fine, but that was
hardly a test.  But I suspect it will tow about as well as any hard dinghy
or maybe a bit better (lighter).

Quote:

>>My goal is to have a simple dinghy that is functional, tows easily and reliably
>>and can be put on deck in foul times.  I prefer to keep thing s simple and row
>>it, but I do have a small cruise N carry (1.5 hp) as well.   Seem I may just
>>prefer to get both to have the right tool for the job.   BUT ,the Walker Bay 8
>>has my attention right now.   Any usefull feedback and advice on this before i
>>go out and throw $$ away?...cheers, Jeff

>A hard dinghy is fine and reliable, but can't be collapsed and is
>often heavy for its size. It is the best choice for hauling cargo to
>and from shore, and the best choice for the dedicated rower. They also
>tow well. But unless I anchored out consistantly, I think a roll-up
>inflatable or a nesting/folding boat is a better idea for you. Again,
>davits would cost less for the existing boat(s) than a new hard
>dinghy.

I would suggest either a folding Port-a-boat or a nesting dinghy if you
really want to bring it on deck.  At the same time, I also encourage you
to look at davits no matter what you choose.  All of these options are on
the heavy side for one person to lift.  It works for me due to the low
freeboard on our trimaran.  On a monohull with high freeboard, it would
be a lot more difficult to lift anything on board.

-=O=- Randy Devol Corsair-31 #213, Joint Venture

 
 
 

Dinghy Advice: Portabote 8 or Walker Bay 8

Post by Jere Lul » Wed, 05 Feb 2003 09:34:24

Quote:

>hello again all, and first off I would like to say thanks.  After returning
>fromt he Strictly Sail show in Chicago, I have seen in person some of the
>product advice given here )from some of you) has been accurate and helpful.

>I have a real quandry, and it plagues many sailors.  Dinghies.  I have a 36
>cruising sailboat ont he Great Lakes and I need to get a better dinghy.
>Choosing between a roll up inflatable (of which I already own 2, a 8 ' Zodiac
>and a 12'Avon and I have never put these on board or towed them, ther are in my
>garage), a plasitc injection molded beat er (which seems to be a decent
>alternative) or the portabote (which I never rode in or know of anybody that
>has).  

>My goal is to have a simple dinghy that is functional, tows easily and reliably
>and can be put on deck in foul times.  I prefer to keep thing s simple and row
>it, but I do have a small cruise N carry (1.5 hp) as well.   Seem I may just
>prefer to get both to have the right tool for the job.   BUT ,the Walker Bay 8
>has my attention right now.   Any usefull feedback and advice on this before i
>go out and throw $$ away?...cheers, Jeff

While you have enough deck space for a RIB, we don't -- with less than
9' between the mast and forestay and our main hatch in between. We got a
12.5' PortaBote and simply love it. Stows on our foredeck without
interfering with anything, planed with a friend's 2 HP Honda (just me:
200#), rows so well that it seems most cruisers don't bother putting the
motor on if they're just putting about the harbor (we haven't for 3 or
so years), and is comfortable for 5 ***s under oar, more under power.

Though it's normally faster to put the boat back on deck for long
distance travelling, it tows just fine on a short teather.

For what I consider an *understated* review, see
http://SportToday.org/'s the article that sold us.

BTW, the difference in price between the 8.5 and 12.5 is (last I
checked) less than $100, so there's almost no reason to get a smaller
version. Also they are limited by outboard *weight*, not size. With
ours, the floation limits us to a 100# motor. You can put heavier on,
but if you get swamped, the boat can sink. I've never been in rough
enough water to overcome the 24" freeboard, but that's your decision.
Personally, I'd be afraid of opening up more than about 10 HP except in
the calmest anchorages. 12 knots with 4 HP is just fine for me. 30+
knots would freak me completely out.

They have some quirks. Our 3 seats and the transom pretty much take over
a quarterberth when the hull's on deck (we found a better location, but
you may not have it). When the boat gets on plane, the bottom falls out
from under your feet. VERY disconcerting, though that's one reason the
boat can go so fast on so little.

Just in case you missed the point, we're VERY happy consumers of the
PortaBote.

--
Jere Lull
Xan-a-Deux ('73 Tanzer 28 #4 out of Tolchester, MD)
Xan's Pages: http://SportToday.org/
Our BVI FAQs (290+ pics) http://SportToday.org/

 
 
 

Dinghy Advice: Portabote 8 or Walker Bay 8

Post by Rosalie B » Wed, 05 Feb 2003 11:50:44

Quote:


>>hello again all, and first off I would like to say thanks.  After returning
>>fromt he Strictly Sail show in Chicago, I have seen in person some of the
>>product advice given here )from some of you) has been accurate and helpful.

>>I have a real quandry, and it plagues many sailors.  Dinghies.  I have a 36
>>cruising sailboat ont he Great Lakes and I need to get a better dinghy.
>>Choosing between a roll up inflatable (of which I already own 2, a 8 ' Zodiac
>>and a 12'Avon and I have never put these on board or towed them, ther are in my
>>garage), a plasitc injection molded beat er (which seems to be a decent
>>alternative) or the portabote (which I never rode in or know of anybody that
>>has).  

>>My goal is to have a simple dinghy that is functional, tows easily and reliably
>>and can be put on deck in foul times.  I prefer to keep thing s simple and row
>>it, but I do have a small cruise N carry (1.5 hp) as well.   Seem I may just
>>prefer to get both to have the right tool for the job.   BUT ,the Walker Bay 8
>>has my attention right now.   Any usefull feedback and advice on this before i
>>go out and throw $$ away?...cheers, Jeff

>While you have enough deck space for a RIB, we don't -- with less than
>9' between the mast and forestay and our main hatch in between. We got a
>12.5' PortaBote and simply love it. Stows on our foredeck without
>interfering with anything, planed with a friend's 2 HP Honda (just me:
>200#), rows so well that it seems most cruisers don't bother putting the
>motor on if they're just putting about the harbor (we haven't for 3 or
>so years), and is comfortable for 5 ***s under oar, more under power.

>Though it's normally faster to put the boat back on deck for long
>distance travelling, it tows just fine on a short teather.

>For what I consider an *understated* review, see
>http://SportToday.org/'s the article that sold us.

>BTW, the difference in price between the 8.5 and 12.5 is (last I
>checked) less than $100, so there's almost no reason to get a smaller
>version. Also they are limited by outboard *weight*, not size. With
>ours, the floation limits us to a 100# motor. You can put heavier on,
>but if you get swamped, the boat can sink. I've never been in rough

I tried to get into ours from the water, and swamped it completely -
the water was over the gunnels.  But didnt didn't sink.  It just
floated right under the surface with me sitting in it.

Ours does say it is limited in the motor hp. and total weight.

Quote:
>enough water to overcome the 24" freeboard, but that's your decision.
>Personally, I'd be afraid of opening up more than about 10 HP except in
>the calmest anchorages. 12 knots with 4 HP is just fine for me. 30+
>knots would freak me completely out.

>They have some quirks. Our 3 seats and the transom pretty much take over
>a quarterberth when the hull's on deck (we found a better location, but

We have it folded up next to the cabin most of the time (the
inflatable is on the davits)  We have had the seats in a locker, but
Bob has made a big Sunbrella bag for all the stuff and that's on the
cabin top on the other side.

Quote:
>you may not have it). When the boat gets on plane, the bottom falls out
>from under your feet. VERY disconcerting, though that's one reason the
>boat can go so fast on so little.

>Just in case you missed the point, we're VERY happy consumers of the
>PortaBote.

grandma Rosalie
 
 
 

Dinghy Advice: Portabote 8 or Walker Bay 8

Post by Steve Christense » Thu, 06 Feb 2003 01:04:49


says...

Quote:

>hello again all, and first off I would like to say thanks.  After returning
>fromt he Strictly Sail show in Chicago, I have seen in person some of the
>product advice given here )from some of you) has been accurate and helpful.

>I have a real quandry, and it plagues many sailors.  Dinghies.  I have a 36
>cruising sailboat ont he Great Lakes and I need to get a better dinghy.
>Choosing between a roll up inflatable (of which I already own 2, a 8 ' Zodiac
>and a 12'Avon and I have never put these on board or towed them, ther are in my
>garage), a plasitc injection molded beat er (which seems to be a decent
>alternative) or the portabote (which I never rode in or know of anybody that
>has).  

We have an 8' Porta Bote as the dinghy for our Ericson 38 on the Great Lakes,
and we highly recommend it.  BUT, while it may only take minutes to dissable it,
getting it on deck, and stowing the parts, takes time and space.  So in practice
we tow it from anchorage to anchorage once we get to our cruising destination
unless it is real rough (in which case we don't usually move anyway).  We bought
the 8 footer to minimze on parts (one less seat to stow) and because it fits
perfectly along the side of the cabin house while underway.  But if you have the
room the 10 footer is a better boat.

I highly recommed the Porta Bote.  But don't think that taking it down and
stowing the parts can be done in 15 minutes.  In that respect I'm not sure it
isn't just as much work as an inflatable, though it does store in a lot smaller
space.  The ride and durability are fantastic though.

Steve Christensen
Midland, MI

 
 
 

Dinghy Advice: Portabote 8 or Walker Bay 8

Post by Mark Weave » Thu, 06 Feb 2003 01:56:21

Quote:

> I have a real quandry, and it plagues many sailors.  Dinghies.  I
> have a 36 cruising sailboat ont he Great Lakes and I need to get a
> better dinghy. Choosing between a roll up inflatable (of which I
> already own 2, a 8 ' Zodiac and a 12'Avon and I have never put these
> on board or towed them, ther are in my garage), a plasitc injection
> molded beat er (which seems to be a decent alternative) or the
> portabote (which I never rode in or know of anybody that has).

We tow an 11' plywood/epoxy dink on the Great Lakes most of the time
(sometimes we use a sea kayak instead).  The dink doesn't (and probably
couldn't) come aboard, but that's OK -- it tows just fine through conditions
as rough as those we want to sail in anyway.  I'm sure we'd find having to
fold and assemble a dink as big a PITA as we found having to blow up the
inflatable we had before the kayak and current dink.  Don't know what your
crew size is, but you might consider a Walker Bay 10 rather than the 8.  You
get a lot more stability and capacity and it's still pretty cheap.

Homebuilt is another possible route.  We really like ours, I enjoyed
building it, and if you really want to be able to take it aboard, you could
build a nesting version.

Mark

 
 
 

Dinghy Advice: Portabote 8 or Walker Bay 8

Post by Rosalie B » Thu, 06 Feb 2003 06:28:24

Quote:


>says...

>>hello again all, and first off I would like to say thanks.  After returning
>>fromt he Strictly Sail show in Chicago, I have seen in person some of the
>>product advice given here )from some of you) has been accurate and helpful.

>>I have a real quandry, and it plagues many sailors.  Dinghies.  I have a 36
>>cruising sailboat ont he Great Lakes and I need to get a better dinghy.
>>Choosing between a roll up inflatable (of which I already own 2, a 8 ' Zodiac
>>and a 12'Avon and I have never put these on board or towed them, ther are in my
>>garage), a plasitc injection molded beat er (which seems to be a decent
>>alternative) or the portabote (which I never rode in or know of anybody that
>>has).  

>We have an 8' Porta Bote as the dinghy for our Ericson 38 on the Great Lakes,
>and we highly recommend it.  BUT, while it may only take minutes to dissable it,
>getting it on deck, and stowing the parts, takes time and space.  So in practice
>we tow it from anchorage to anchorage once we get to our cruising destination
>unless it is real rough (in which case we don't usually move anyway).  We bought
>the 8 footer to minimze on parts (one less seat to stow) and because it fits
>perfectly along the side of the cabin house while underway.  But if you have the
>room the 10 footer is a better boat.

>I highly recommed the Porta Bote.  But don't think that taking it down and
>stowing the parts can be done in 15 minutes.  In that respect I'm not sure it
>isn't just as much work as an inflatable, though it does store in a lot smaller
>space.  The ride and durability are fantastic though.

We were on a mooring in Miami off and on from December 2000 to March
2001 (with trips down the Keys, 3 weeks in Key West, trip from there
to the Dry Tortuguas and two weeks in the Bahamas interspersed), and
Bob didn't want to leave the dinghy at the dinghy dock.  The dinghy
dock was full of mangrove roots and various other inimical to
inflatable things (the only one that wasn't deflated and sad looking
was on a big foam pad), so he didn't want to use that dinghy.  So we
used the portabote.  

We'd assemble it on the deck and put it over using the whisker pole as
a crane, and row or motor to the dinghy dock, disassemble it and put
it in the back of my SIL's pick up truck (it stuck out the back a
little), and drive to our daughter's house and take it out of the
truck and put it in the yard.  When we did the reverse, we'd pull the
dinghy up onto the deck to disassemble, again using the whisker pole
as a crane.

Eventually I did persuade Bob that we could transport the dinghy
without disassembling it, and then we just stuck it upside down in the
yard.  And after we'd been there two weeks, he was willing to leave
the dinghy at the dinghy 'dock' locked to a tree.  

We got a lot of practice putting it together and taking it apart in
that time.  (We had to be back on the boat morning and evening to run
the refrigeration,)  I never timed it, but I don't think it took much
longer to take apart than it took to put it together.  Actually I
think it was quite a bit quicker.  Bob did have containers for all the
parts - a small bag for the little wing nuts and bolts, that is
attached to the top of the larger bag for the seats etc.  Cause if we
lost that stuff, we'd be SOL.

grandma Rosalie

 
 
 

Dinghy Advice: Portabote 8 or Walker Bay 8

Post by Jere Lul » Thu, 06 Feb 2003 11:28:24

Quote:

><snip of a lot of good points; this is for Grandma's Bob>

>Bob did have containers for all the
>parts - a small bag for the little wing nuts and bolts, that is
>attached to the top of the larger bag for the seats etc.  Cause if we
>lost that stuff, we'd be SOL.

I've had no trouble with stowing the seat clips in the boat, itself, and
screwing the transom bolts (and our attached riding bridle) onto the
transom for stowage. Everything seems to stay in its place.

Of course I have extra of everything in my junk drawer just in case, but
I haven't needed it.

--
Jere Lull
Xan-a-Deux ('73 Tanzer 28 #4 out of Tolchester, MD)
Xan's Pages: http://members.dca.net/jerelull/X-Main.html
Our BVI FAQs (290+ pics) http://homepage.mac.com/jerelull/BVI/

 
 
 

Dinghy Advice: Portabote 8 or Walker Bay 8

Post by Frank Wiewand » Fri, 07 Feb 2003 00:06:05

Mark,

Quote:
> Homebuilt is another possible route.  We really like ours, I enjoyed
> building it, and if you really want to be able to take it aboard,
you could
> build a nesting version.

Which design did you build?

TIA,

Frank Wiewandt

 
 
 

Dinghy Advice: Portabote 8 or Walker Bay 8

Post by Rosalie B » Sat, 08 Feb 2003 10:15:02

Quote:


>><snip of a lot of good points; this is for Grandma's Bob>

>>Bob did have containers for all the
>>parts - a small bag for the little wing nuts and bolts, that is
>>attached to the top of the larger bag for the seats etc.  Cause if we
>>lost that stuff, we'd be SOL.

>I've had no trouble with stowing the seat clips in the boat, itself, and
>screwing the transom bolts (and our attached riding bridle) onto the
>transom for stowage. Everything seems to stay in its place.

>Of course I have extra of everything in my junk drawer just in case, but
>I haven't needed it.

We don't have a square one.  Bob says he thinks it is possible to put
it all inside, but we don't have to, and it doesn't stow as flat that
way.

grandma Rosalie
http://www12.virtualtourist.com/m/4a9c6/

 
 
 

Dinghy Advice: Portabote 8 or Walker Bay 8

Post by Mark Weave » Tue, 11 Feb 2003 02:45:43

Quote:

> Mark,

>> Homebuilt is another possible route.  We really like ours, I enjoyed
>> building it, and if you really want to be able to take it aboard,
>> you could build a nesting version.

> Which design did you build?

I built a Spindrift from B&B Yacht designs:

http://www.bandbyachtdesigns.com/

Mine is the 11-foot, non-nesting, cat-rigged version:

http://www.fototime.com/2C64AA53BF5523E/standard.jpg

(Those orange things aren't part of the original design -- they're my
swim-noodle fenders ;)

Mark

 
 
 

Dinghy Advice: Portabote 8 or Walker Bay 8

Post by Frank Wiewand » Tue, 11 Feb 2003 13:18:12

Thanks Mark,

Quote:
> I built a Spindrift from B&B Yacht designs:

Neat boat. How long did it take you to build? Any estimate on what
your final cost (not including labor ;-) was? I've thought about
building something along those lines to replace our aging inflatable.
I'd probably do a sailing version, possibly nesting.

Also, where do you sail in the Great Lakes? I sail mostly in Lake
Erie.

Take care,

Frank Wiewandt