Info on sailing around NYC wanted.

Info on sailing around NYC wanted.

Post by USA » Wed, 03 Mar 1993 02:20:53


Sometime this coming May, I'll be delivering a boat from Essex CT. to
Sodus Bay, NY. My first thought is to take the boat to New York City,
up the Hudson, and up the Erie Barge C***to Oswego, then on to Sodus
Bay. Can any of you NYC sailors tell me if the East River is navigable
for a boat with a 45' mast? Do you know how far up the Hudson I can get
before having to pull the mast? I could sail to the Hudson on either side
of Long Island. Any recomendations or thoughts? Things to consider while
sailing in this area? Thanks in advance!
        tomb..


 
 
 

Info on sailing around NYC wanted.

Post by daniel.c.mckibb » Thu, 04 Mar 1993 00:45:34

Quote:

>Sometime this coming May, I'll be delivering a boat from Essex CT. to
>Sodus Bay, NY. My first thought is to take the boat to New York City,
>up the Hudson, and up the Erie Barge C***to Oswego, then on to Sodus
>Bay. Can any of you NYC sailors tell me if the East River is navigable
>for a boat with a 45' mast? Do you know how far up the Hudson I can get
>before having to pull the mast? I could sail to the Hudson on either side
>of Long Island. Any recomendations or thoughts? Things to consider while
>sailing in this area? Thanks in advance!
>    tomb..



I am sure that there is 45' of clearance from Hells Gate down the East River,
but I can't quote bridge heights.  Heading up the Hudson, the mast can be
kept up until Troy (a fine city where I drank my way through college :) ).
One of the marinas a little bit south of Albany has a hand operated derrick
for unstepping the mast.  I'll look in the cruising guide to Lake Champlain
that my parents write for the name of the marina.

Look out for junk floating in New York harbor.  When I was there for the last
fourth of July, a timber that was around 1' X 1' X 14' floated by.  There was
a 1" bolt sticking out about 6"!  

Dan McKibben
"Wachusett"
Point Pleasant, NJ

"living aboard means no lawn care!"

'

 
 
 

Info on sailing around NYC wanted.

Post by philip a wei » Thu, 04 Mar 1993 16:53:42


Quote:
>I am sure that there is 45' of clearance from Hells Gate down the East River,
>but I can't quote bridge heights.  Heading up the Hudson, the mast can be
>kept up until Troy (a fine city where I drank my way through college :) ).
>One of the marinas a little bit south of Albany has a hand operated derrick
>for unstepping the mast.  I'll look in the cruising guide to Lake Champlain
>that my parents write for the name of the marina.

>Look out for junk floating in New York harbor.  When I was there for the last
>fourth of July, a timber that was around 1' X 1' X 14' floated by.  There was
>a 1" bolt sticking out about 6"!  

>Dan McKibben
>"Wachusett"
>Point Pleasant, NJ

Also, make sure you check your tides twice.  Currents can run up to 5 knots
in Hell's gate, and close to that down the East River.  Time it right, and you
can fly right through, and catch the tide change at the Battery, and ride
right up the Hudson.  If you want to stay over in NYC, I recommend the
Newport Marina in Hoboken, they are reasonable, extremely friendly, with a
large live-aboard community that loves transients.  If one wants, it is one
stop on the PATH train into Manhatten, but Hoboken is interesting itself.  As
for which route to take, I've never gone outside there, but I know there is
almost nowhere for a boat your size to go in.  The sound would probably be
safer, and more interesting.  Watch out for ferries, cruise ships, cargo ships,
etc.  rounding the Battery, it can be quite confused (don't try it in the
dark).  Enjoy.


--


 
 
 

Info on sailing around NYC wanted.

Post by John F. Hugh » Thu, 04 Mar 1993 20:21:47

Quote:

>Also, make sure you check your tides twice.  Currents can run up to 5 knots
>in Hell's gate, and close to that down the East River.  Time it right, and you
>can fly right through, [...]

Two more things. (1) Check your engine before you go. This is *not* a place to
be caught without the engine that you'd been counting on. Alternatively,
you can make sure that you do it on a day with plenty of wind and a very
capable crew ... (2) Watch out when sailing under bridges, especially railroad
bridges. There was a time (so I have heard) when the youth of NY got its kicks
by*** out on the bridges to drop things on boats passing below.

One more thing---carry Eldridge with you. It has just the information you need
(little current chart insets, time of tide-change at various locations,
relevant radio channels, etc.)

-John

 
 
 

Info on sailing around NYC wanted.

Post by Marc Ausland » Fri, 05 Mar 1993 23:57:49

I make that trip, as far as Ossining N.Y., every year.  If you want to
make it quickly, but not sail 24 hours a day, you go to Port Jeff on
the first day.  On the second day, tides willing, you can get from
Port Jeff all the way around NY and stop somewhere on the lower
Hudson.  If you want to trade some rolling for a really marvelous
visual experience, anchor near to Ellis Island.

I've never tried the Newport Marina in Hoboken.  None of those marina
ever looked like they had any water, but I never asked.  (I draw 5 feet).

You can get a mooring for the night at a scruffy looking yard just
north of the George Washington Bridge on the East side of the river.
Its called***man's marine.  Don't count on radio contact with them.
Plan to eat aboard.  Don't plan an anchoring in the river - current
against wind effects can cause your anchor rode to wrap around the
keel.  (I have anchored just south of the GWB on the West side of the
river, but I won't again :-).

If you want a shorter second day, you can stop somewhere in the
Western sound.  Manhasset bay has several large marina with moorings
and slips, and restaurants ashore.  You can usually get a free
overnight berth in the west branch of Mamaroneck Harbor.  Or you can
get a mooring or anchor near City Island.  Any of these will let you
make a passage the next day all the way around NYC and up the Hudson.

You could then spend the night at Shattemuc, my club in Ossining, or
one of the other clubs in the Tapan Zee area.  
--



 
 
 

Info on sailing around NYC wanted.

Post by David Ben » Fri, 05 Mar 1993 17:55:01


Quote:
>Sometime this coming May, I'll be delivering a boat from Essex CT. to
>Sodus Bay, NY. My first thought is to take the boat to New York City,
>up the Hudson, and up the Erie Barge C***to Oswego, then on to Sodus
>Bay. Can any of you NYC sailors tell me if the East River is navigable
>for a boat with a 45' mast? Do you know how far up the Hudson I can get
>before having to pull the mast? I could sail to the Hudson on either side
>of Long Island. Any recomendations or thoughts? Things to consider while
>sailing in this area? Thanks in advance!
>    tomb..



I can't tell you about the upper Hudson, but you'll have no problems with the
mast between say Essex and Albany. We get some _pretty big_ frieghters
in the sound. Vertical clearance in the East river south of hell gate
is probably close to 140 ft above MLW. Don't try the Harlem river, go
south around the battery.
BTW, the currents in New York Harbor and especially Hell Gate are wicked
(8 or 9 knots at times) Plan your transit so that you pass Throgs Neck
just after Hell Gate turns in your favor, even if it means stopping
at City Island (Ask Roy Smith what to do there)
Personally, I'd take the inside route, Montauk being at least 40 miles
out of your way. Also, there are _no_ harbors on the south side of
Long Island that will accomodate anything that draws over 4 ft. You have
to keep going till you get to New York or even Atlantic City if you get
in trouble.

Dave B.
--

                           Compu$erve: 72630,1416

 
 
 

Info on sailing around NYC wanted.

Post by USA » Sat, 06 Mar 1993 02:13:01

Quote:


>>I am sure that there is 45' of clearance from Hells Gate down the East River,
>>but I can't quote bridge heights.  Heading up the Hudson, the mast can be
>>kept up until Troy (a fine city where I drank my way through college :) ).
>>One of the marinas a little bit south of Albany has a hand operated derrick
>>for unstepping the mast.  I'll look in the cruising guide to Lake Champlain
>>that my parents write for the name of the marina.

>>Look out for junk floating in New York harbor.  When I was there for the last
>>fourth of July, a timber that was around 1' X 1' X 14' floated by.  There was
>>a 1" bolt sticking out about 6"!  

>>Dan McKibben
>>"Wachusett"
>>Point Pleasant, NJ

>Also, make sure you check your tides twice.  Currents can run up to 5 knots
>in Hell's gate, and close to that down the East River.  Time it right, and you
>can fly right through, and catch the tide change at the Battery, and ride
>right up the Hudson.  If you want to stay over in NYC, I recommend the
>Newport Marina in Hoboken, they are reasonable, extremely friendly, with a
>large live-aboard community that loves transients.  If one wants, it is one
>stop on the PATH train into Manhatten, but Hoboken is interesting itself.  As
>for which route to take, I've never gone outside there, but I know there is
>almost nowhere for a boat your size to go in.  The sound would probably be
>safer, and more interesting.  Watch out for ferries, cruise ships, cargo ships,
>etc.  rounding the Battery, it can be quite confused (don't try it in the
>dark).  Enjoy.


>--


Thanks to everyone for the helpful advice. But now I'm getting nervous.
I'm not sure I wanna sail through anyplace called 'Hell's Gate'. Just
what is this? It sounds like a tide-race through narrow shores. Is
this part of the East River? Anybody wanna play pilot for a day??

        tomb..


Laser #15878
Bristol Corsair #270 (time to sell, anyone interested?)
Alberg 37 #22921

 
 
 

Info on sailing around NYC wanted.

Post by philip a wei » Sat, 06 Mar 1993 15:14:38

Quote:

>I've never tried the Newport Marina in Hoboken.  None of those marina
>ever looked like they had any water, but I never asked.  (I draw 5 feet).

Plenty of water (I believe at least 9ft), plenty of room, and nice guys on
mountain bikes with handhelds ready to talk you in (Nelson & crew).

BTW, Hell Gate really isn't that bad, just not trivial.  A chart and a close
eye on the tides is all you need (and a working motor), and plenty of daylight.

--

 
 
 

Info on sailing around NYC wanted.

Post by David W. Levi » Wed, 10 Mar 1993 09:44:38

One more thing to worry about, if you're low on power, is the weather.
On the whole, once you are in the Hudson, the wind often likes to blow
along the length of river, often from the north, right in your face. It can
be a major grind from the Battery north, if the wind and current are
both in your face. Be prepared for a long day if you want to push north of
the NYC area before stopping, and be very careful of commercial traffic if
you push on past sunset, or decide to anchor. Those guys will run close
in along
the short to avoid a foil current or breeze, and they aren't all that great
at spotting people where they don't expect them. I wouldn't recommend being
in the harbor south of the George Washington Bridge at night, period, too much
traffic, too much debris that you'll have trouble seeing.


                   -- My Opinions, IBM's hardware. --
"Fanaticism consists in redoubling your efforts when you have forgotten your
aim" - George Santayana