Why do boats have "dead mans throttle"?

Why do boats have "dead mans throttle"?

Post by justwaitafrekinmin.. » Sat, 21 Jun 2008 23:31:54


Well, the title says it all. Maybe a hundred years ago it was cool,
but there is really too much traffic in most places now for folks to
have unattended helm, even for a few seconds. Why do they still do it?
 
 
 

Why do boats have "dead mans throttle"?

Post by LoogyPic.. » Sat, 21 Jun 2008 23:39:22


Quote:
> Well, the title says it all. Maybe a hundred years ago it was cool,
> but there is really too much traffic in most places now for folks to
> have unattended helm, even for a few seconds. Why do they still do it?

I like the ordinary shifter/throttle, it's just what I'm used to. I
don't like the hotfoot setup, just seems weird to have a gas peddle in
a boat! And I drove a friend's pontoon boat one time and the throttle
was on the left side of the helm!! I didn't care for that, either!

 
 
 

Why do boats have "dead mans throttle"?

Post by Jim » Sun, 22 Jun 2008 00:15:26


Quote:
> Well, the title says it all. Maybe a hundred years ago it was cool,
> but there is really too much traffic in most places now for folks to
> have unattended helm, even for a few seconds. Why do they still do it?

Because it is still cool.

On a train, let go of the throttle and the engine dies. In the case of a
boat, It's a lanyard attached to your wrist and the other end trips a kill
switch if the lanyard is pulled. Unfortunately, on a boat, it is not a
passive device. It won't work if the operator chooses not to attach the
wrist strap.

 
 
 

Why do boats have "dead mans throttle"?

Post by LoogyPic.. » Sun, 22 Jun 2008 00:38:04

On Jun 20, 11:25?am, Gene Kearns

Quote:

> On Fri, 20 Jun 2008 07:31:54 -0700 (PDT),

> thoughts to the readers of rec.boats:

> >Well, the title says it all. Maybe a hundred years ago it was cool,
> >but there is really too much traffic in most places now for folks to
> >have unattended helm, even for a few seconds. Why do they still do it?

> Because trains don't jounce up and down like boats. On anything other
> that a calm lake, the overworked accelerator pump would double the
> amount of gas used per mile.

> --

> Grady-White Gulfstream, out of Oak Island, NC.

> Homepagehttp://pamandgene.idleplay.net/? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ?

> Rec.boats at Lee Yeaton's Bayguidehttp://www.thebayguide.com/rec.boats? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ?

I never thought about it, but whenever I've had the chance to use a
hotfoot setup, it was indeed just like that.
 
 
 

Why do boats have "dead mans throttle"?

Post by Larr » Sun, 22 Jun 2008 02:05:44



Quote:
> Well, the title says it all. Maybe a hundred years ago it was cool,
> but there is really too much traffic in most places now for folks to
> have unattended helm, even for a few seconds. Why do they still do it?

You need to get out more.  What you say is true in the waters around the
overcrowded cities and various ditches people seem to find fascinating to
go boating in.  But, on the ocean, you can travel for days and never be
in VHF range with a soul, once you are away from the channels into those
cities.  Even going up the East Coast of the USA, you can travel for
hours and never see another boat or ship, especially one that needs your
attention.  The sea is still just a vast, empty place, away from the sea
lanes....and oh so peaceful!

Our helm is attended by a Dell Latitude laptop running "The Cap'n" nav
software steering a B&G Network PILOT electro/hydraulic autopilot, except
after the crew hits the rack when we switch the autopilot to WIND so we
don't have to fool around with sail setting in the dark needlessly.  It
simply follows the wind all night, leaving us in peace, mostly, to sleep.

There are always 2 crew on watch, 24/7, but they don't really "steer", a
mundane job that grows old very quickly after day one at sea.  Fishing,
lazing around half *** in the sun, ham radio and a little necessary
maintenance are much more interesting.  Let "George" steer the boat.

Even on powerboats, if you have an autopilot, you don't need to steer
them at sea.  You set a course, the autopilot keeps it.  You have to look
forward more often because you're moving faster so the horizon comes up
quicker where you have to look again to see what's ahead.

Driving down a ditch just SUCKS!

 
 
 

Why do boats have "dead mans throttle"?

Post by Richard Casa » Sun, 22 Jun 2008 03:02:45

Quote:


>> Well, the title says it all. Maybe a hundred years ago it was cool,
>> but there is really too much traffic in most places now for folks to
>> have unattended helm, even for a few seconds. Why do they still do it?

>I like the ordinary shifter/throttle, it's just what I'm used to. I
>don't like the hotfoot setup, just seems weird to have a gas peddle in
>a boat! And I drove a friend's pontoon boat one time and the throttle
>was on the left side of the helm!! I didn't care for that, either!

We have a jet drive, on of the first ones ever sold in the US, with a
foot throttle that has no spring and stays where you put it, unlike
the case with autos. Operated with left foot, toe for on, heel for
off, hinged in the middle, not at the end.

Casady

 
 
 

Why do boats have "dead mans throttle"?

Post by justwaitafrekinmin.. » Thu, 26 Jun 2008 22:42:14


Quote:

> >> Because trains don't jounce up and down like boats. On anything other
> >> that a calm lake, the overworked accelerator pump would double the
> >> amount of gas used per mile.

> >> --

> >> Grady-White Gulfstream, out of Oak Island, NC.

> >> Homepagehttp://SportToday.org/

> >> Rec.boats at Lee Yeaton's Bayguidehttp://SportToday.org/

> >I never thought about it, but whenever I've had the chance to use a
> >hotfoot setup, it was indeed just like that.

> All the guys I know with the hot foot throttle (bass boats) will never
> have a bounce problem because it is either idling or smashed ***
> the deck.

I was not suggesting a foot pedal, what I am suggesting is a return
spring so if you turn or walk away, fall, etc, the boat stops.... I
know you open ocean guys might have issues with it, but the normal
lake or river boater might be better to get used to looking forward
and actually driving the boat.
 
 
 

Why do boats have "dead mans throttle"?

Post by Jim » Thu, 26 Jun 2008 23:32:49



Quote:

> >> Because trains don't jounce up and down like boats. On anything other
> >> that a calm lake, the overworked accelerator pump would double the
> >> amount of gas used per mile.

> >> --

> >> Grady-White Gulfstream, out of Oak Island, NC.

> >> Homepagehttp://SportToday.org/

> >> Rec.boats at Lee Yeaton's Bayguidehttp://SportToday.org/

> >I never thought about it, but whenever I've had the chance to use a
> >hotfoot setup, it was indeed just like that.

> All the guys I know with the hot foot throttle (bass boats) will never
> have a bounce problem because it is either idling or smashed ***
> the deck.

I was not suggesting a foot pedal, what I am suggesting is a return
spring so if you turn or walk away, fall, etc, the boat stops.... I
know you open ocean guys might have issues with it, but the normal
lake or river boater might be better to get used to looking forward
and actually driving the boat.

The kill lanyard serves that purpose but if you absolutely want the throttle
to return to idle, loosen the friction adjustment on the throttle and, if
necessary install a heavier throttle return spring. The boat will continue
to move at idle speed. Either option could result in unintended
consequences.

 
 
 

Why do boats have "dead mans throttle"?

Post by Jim » Thu, 26 Jun 2008 23:32:49



Quote:

> >> Because trains don't jounce up and down like boats. On anything other
> >> that a calm lake, the overworked accelerator pump would double the
> >> amount of gas used per mile.

> >> --

> >> Grady-White Gulfstream, out of Oak Island, NC.

> >> Homepagehttp://SportToday.org/

> >> Rec.boats at Lee Yeaton's Bayguidehttp://SportToday.org/

> >I never thought about it, but whenever I've had the chance to use a
> >hotfoot setup, it was indeed just like that.

> All the guys I know with the hot foot throttle (bass boats) will never
> have a bounce problem because it is either idling or smashed ***
> the deck.

I was not suggesting a foot pedal, what I am suggesting is a return
spring so if you turn or walk away, fall, etc, the boat stops.... I
know you open ocean guys might have issues with it, but the normal
lake or river boater might be better to get used to looking forward
and actually driving the boat.

The kill lanyard serves that purpose but if you absolutely want the throttle
to return to idle, loosen the friction adjustment on the throttle and, if
necessary install a heavier throttle return spring. The boat will continue
to move at idle speed. Either option could result in unintended
consequences.

 
 
 

Why do boats have "dead mans throttle"?

Post by Jim » Thu, 26 Jun 2008 23:32:49



Quote:

> >> Because trains don't jounce up and down like boats. On anything other
> >> that a calm lake, the overworked accelerator pump would double the
> >> amount of gas used per mile.

> >> --

> >> Grady-White Gulfstream, out of Oak Island, NC.

> >> Homepagehttp://SportToday.org/

> >> Rec.boats at Lee Yeaton's Bayguidehttp://SportToday.org/

> >I never thought about it, but whenever I've had the chance to use a
> >hotfoot setup, it was indeed just like that.

> All the guys I know with the hot foot throttle (bass boats) will never
> have a bounce problem because it is either idling or smashed ***
> the deck.

I was not suggesting a foot pedal, what I am suggesting is a return
spring so if you turn or walk away, fall, etc, the boat stops.... I
know you open ocean guys might have issues with it, but the normal
lake or river boater might be better to get used to looking forward
and actually driving the boat.

The kill lanyard serves that purpose but if you absolutely want the throttle
to return to idle, loosen the friction adjustment on the throttle and, if
necessary install a heavier throttle return spring. The boat will continue
to move at idle speed. Either option could result in unintended
consequences.

 
 
 

Why do boats have "dead mans throttle"?

Post by Jim » Thu, 26 Jun 2008 23:32:49



Quote:

> >> Because trains don't jounce up and down like boats. On anything other
> >> that a calm lake, the overworked accelerator pump would double the
> >> amount of gas used per mile.

> >> --

> >> Grady-White Gulfstream, out of Oak Island, NC.

> >> Homepagehttp://SportToday.org/

> >> Rec.boats at Lee Yeaton's Bayguidehttp://SportToday.org/

> >I never thought about it, but whenever I've had the chance to use a
> >hotfoot setup, it was indeed just like that.

> All the guys I know with the hot foot throttle (bass boats) will never
> have a bounce problem because it is either idling or smashed ***
> the deck.

I was not suggesting a foot pedal, what I am suggesting is a return
spring so if you turn or walk away, fall, etc, the boat stops.... I
know you open ocean guys might have issues with it, but the normal
lake or river boater might be better to get used to looking forward
and actually driving the boat.

The kill lanyard serves that purpose but if you absolutely want the throttle
to return to idle, loosen the friction adjustment on the throttle and, if
necessary install a heavier throttle return spring. The boat will continue
to move at idle speed. Either option could result in unintended
consequences.

 
 
 

Why do boats have "dead mans throttle"?

Post by Jim » Thu, 26 Jun 2008 23:32:49



Quote:

> >> Because trains don't jounce up and down like boats. On anything other
> >> that a calm lake, the overworked accelerator pump would double the
> >> amount of gas used per mile.

> >> --

> >> Grady-White Gulfstream, out of Oak Island, NC.

> >> Homepagehttp://SportToday.org/

> >> Rec.boats at Lee Yeaton's Bayguidehttp://SportToday.org/

> >I never thought about it, but whenever I've had the chance to use a
> >hotfoot setup, it was indeed just like that.

> All the guys I know with the hot foot throttle (bass boats) will never
> have a bounce problem because it is either idling or smashed ***
> the deck.

I was not suggesting a foot pedal, what I am suggesting is a return
spring so if you turn or walk away, fall, etc, the boat stops.... I
know you open ocean guys might have issues with it, but the normal
lake or river boater might be better to get used to looking forward
and actually driving the boat.

The kill lanyard serves that purpose but if you absolutely want the throttle
to return to idle, loosen the friction adjustment on the throttle and, if
necessary install a heavier throttle return spring. The boat will continue
to move at idle speed. Either option could result in unintended
consequences.

 
 
 

Why do boats have "dead mans throttle"?

Post by Jim » Thu, 26 Jun 2008 23:32:49



Quote:

> >> Because trains don't jounce up and down like boats. On anything other
> >> that a calm lake, the overworked accelerator pump would double the
> >> amount of gas used per mile.

> >> --

> >> Grady-White Gulfstream, out of Oak Island, NC.

> >> Homepagehttp://SportToday.org/

> >> Rec.boats at Lee Yeaton's Bayguidehttp://SportToday.org/

> >I never thought about it, but whenever I've had the chance to use a
> >hotfoot setup, it was indeed just like that.

> All the guys I know with the hot foot throttle (bass boats) will never
> have a bounce problem because it is either idling or smashed ***
> the deck.

I was not suggesting a foot pedal, what I am suggesting is a return
spring so if you turn or walk away, fall, etc, the boat stops.... I
know you open ocean guys might have issues with it, but the normal
lake or river boater might be better to get used to looking forward
and actually driving the boat.

The kill lanyard serves that purpose but if you absolutely want the throttle
to return to idle, loosen the friction adjustment on the throttle and, if
necessary install a heavier throttle return spring. The boat will continue
to move at idle speed. Either option could result in unintended
consequences.

 
 
 

Why do boats have "dead mans throttle"?

Post by justwaitafrekinmin.. » Thu, 26 Jun 2008 23:48:11


Quote:




> > >> Because trains don't jounce up and down like boats. On anything other
> > >> that a calm lake, the overworked accelerator pump would double the
> > >> amount of gas used per mile.

> > >> --

> > >> Grady-White Gulfstream, out of Oak Island, NC.

> > >> Homepagehttp://SportToday.org/

> > >> Rec.boats at Lee Yeaton's Bayguidehttp://SportToday.org/

> > >I never thought about it, but whenever I've had the chance to use a
> > >hotfoot setup, it was indeed just like that.

> > All the guys I know with the hot foot throttle (bass boats) will never
> > have a bounce problem because it is either idling or smashed ***
> > the deck.

> I was not suggesting a foot pedal, what I am suggesting is a return
> spring so if you turn or walk away, fall, etc, the boat stops.... I
> know you open ocean guys might have issues with it, but the normal
> lake or river boater might be better to get used to looking forward
> and actually driving the boat.

> The kill lanyard serves that purpose but if you absolutely want the throttle
> to return to idle, loosen the friction adjustment on the throttle and, if
> necessary install a heavier throttle return spring. The boat will continue
> to move at idle speed. Either option could result in unintended
> consequences.- Hide quoted text -

> - Show quoted text -

Sure, the lanyard is great but it should be a last ditch safety
feature in case the driver gets thrown out of the boat or onto the
deck. Rmember, once the lanyard is pulled, you have in most cases no
control of the boat at all. What I mean, and we have all done it, is
tying off a rig, or turning around to talk while at the helm, for a
much longer period than you would in a car. I would almost bet that
most boat collisions, one or more of the captains had the dead mans
throttle set at speed and never saw the other boat coming.. My point
is, it is easier to "not drive" with a dead mans throttle, especially
in a boat...
 
 
 

Why do boats have "dead mans throttle"?

Post by Jim » Thu, 26 Jun 2008 23:50:00

Sorry! It wasn't a stuck key. My newsreader stopped responding and I tried
to send the message over again, and again, and again. :-)