It's Done!

It's Done!

Post by Roger Lon » Mon, 02 Jun 2008 08:33:21


I finished putting the mast back together today.  There is nothing left to
do before launch other than standard spring stuff like bottom paint.

This winter kind of spiraled out of control into what they call a "mid-life
refit" on commercial vessels:

http://home.maine.rr.com/rlma/08Winter.htm

I spent 2/3 of her purchase price just in materials and 20 to 30 grand worth
of my time at local shipyard rates.  It could never be justified with a
calculator but it was absolutely worth it.

BTW, if you are in New England, my next cruising story is out in the current
"Points East".

--
Roger Long

 
 
 

It's Done!

Post by tsmw.. » Mon, 02 Jun 2008 09:49:10


...
Quote:
> This winter kind of spiraled out of control into what they call a "mid-life
> refit" on commercial vessels:

...

They'll do that.  Nice thing is that they live forever if you keep it
up.  Bad thing is mid-life comes about every three years on my boat.
Maryann and I spent the afternoon working over our list.  Scary.  Must
be nice to have it behind you for a bit.  When do you launch?

-- Tom.

 
 
 

It's Done!

Post by Roger Lon » Mon, 02 Jun 2008 18:54:25

The boat goes in next Friday, D Day.  I may have a delay becoming a sailboat
though.  I was going to put the mast up at the wharf where I'm keeping the
boat but just figured out that the configuration of the crane and dock makes
it impractical.  So, I've got to go get in the line at the yard next door.
You'd never know there was a recession up here.  I went to the marine
electronics place literally 200 feet from the shed where I'm working on the
mast to buy the new coax.  I thought the end fitting that went at the top of
the mast in the weather had to be crimped on with a special tool and I asked
if they could come over and do it.  It sounded like it would be a couple of
weeks.  I said, "But, it will take 5 minutes and I'm right there next door."

"We've got six jobs going right next door the other way.  Full Nav-Net
packages.", he said, looking down his nose.

"Always good to be in the toy business during a recession", I said.

I was relieved to find out that they consider the hand crimp terminals just
as good.  I was even more relieved to find out that they were out of RG-58.
It turned out that a pre made 50' length with W.T. molded terminals was the
same price at Hamilton.  I put that terminal up in the weather and the hand
crimped one will be inside the mast.

I expect I'll still be working on the boat a lot next year, just as you do.
I've reached the point now though where I've rebuilt or checked every
critical system and completed the major additions.  If I decide to take her
south next fall and then start a few years of cruising from there, she's
ready to go and shouldn't need any more major work that I can't undertake
while she's operational.

--
Roger Long

 
 
 

It's Done!

Post by tsmw.. » Tue, 03 Jun 2008 01:16:33


...

Quote:
> If I decide to take her
> south next fall and then start a few years of cruising from there, she's
> ready to go and shouldn't need any more major work that I can't undertake
> while she's operational. ...

South?  What do you have in mind?  We're hoping to head South along
the left coast.  I've been looking at the timing of things and found
http://weather.unisys.com/hurricane/index.html interesting.  Just
downloaded the historic data and am massaging it so I can do some
analysis.  With wx, what you see is what you get, but sometimes it's
fun to have numbers to impress folks with.

I haven't done it for a while, but the last mechanical co-ax ends I
put together on the boat took solder pretty well, too.

-- Tom.

 
 
 

It's Done!

Post by Roger Lon » Tue, 03 Jun 2008 04:59:48


Quote:

> South?  What do you have in mind?

It's one of those half formed ideas that probably won't pan out but it's
still nice to have the boat at a point where it's an option.  I would move
the boat to Solomon's MD in September so she would be waiting for me when I
arrive on the research vessel delivery.  I would then continue on to
somewhere around Charleston and leave the boat in wet storage so we could
take a break from winter by going down and sailing for a week or so when
it's early spring there and still the dead of winter up here.  I'd then head
for Nova Scotia and Newfoundland directly from there.  From what I've seen
of Florida and how I like hot weather, Charleston is about as far south as I
have much ambition to go.

There are a lot of personal and professional complications and commitments
that would make such a plan hard to pull off this year but the feeling of
freedom knowing the boat is ready is priceless.

--
Roger Long

 
 
 

It's Done!

Post by jeff » Tue, 03 Jun 2008 08:14:09

Quote:


>> South?  What do you have in mind?

> It's one of those half formed ideas that probably won't pan out but it's
> still nice to have the boat at a point where it's an option.  I would move
> the boat to Solomon's MD in September so she would be waiting for me when I
> arrive on the research vessel delivery.  I would then continue on to
> somewhere around Charleston and leave the boat in wet storage so we could
> take a break from winter by going down and sailing for a week or so when
> it's early spring there and still the dead of winter up here.  I'd then head
> for Nova Scotia and Newfoundland directly from there.  From what I've seen
> of Florida and how I like hot weather, Charleston is about as far south as I
> have much ambition to go.

> There are a lot of personal and professional complications and commitments
> that would make such a plan hard to pull off this year but the feeling of
> freedom knowing the boat is ready is priceless.

You should run this plan past our mutual friends on MoonShadow.  They
winter near Charleston but don't often get north fast enough to go to
Newfoundland.  And the last time they went over, the season was so brief
they wintered over in Burgeo in order to get the full effect!
 
 
 

It's Done!

Post by Roger Lon » Tue, 03 Jun 2008 21:03:48


Quote:

> You should run this plan past our mutual friends on MoonShadow.  They
> winter near Charleston but don't often get north fast enough to go to
> Newfoundland.  And the last time they went over, the season was so brief
> they wintered over in Burgeo in order to get the full effect!

I've been aboard their boat and talked with them about the trip.  Leaving
the boat in Canada for the winter figures in my plans.  I also want to see
N.S. first so starting from the Charleston area would probably mean just
doing N.S. the first summer and either leaving the boat there or feeling
free the next to just blast past  (is 5 knots average "blasting") the next.

--
Roger Long

 
 
 

It's Done!

Post by Don Whit » Wed, 04 Jun 2008 05:47:04


Quote:

>> You should run this plan past our mutual friends on MoonShadow.  They
>> winter near Charleston but don't often get north fast enough to go to
>> Newfoundland.  And the last time they went over, the season was so brief
>> they wintered over in Burgeo in order to get the full effect!

> I've been aboard their boat and talked with them about the trip.  Leaving
> the boat in Canada for the winter figures in my plans.  I also want to see
> N.S. first so starting from the Charleston area would probably mean just
> doing N.S. the first summer and either leaving the boat there or feeling
> free the next to just blast past  (is 5 knots average "blasting") the
> next.

> --
> Roger Long

Probably a good idea.  Fog can make the Atlantic Coast miserable well into
July. (depending on the year)  August and September are usually  beautiful.
Winds seem to pick up in October and the nights can get a bit cool.
Sure makes for a short comfortable sailing season.