OLD SAILS (WAS DACRON SAIL RESTORATIO

OLD SAILS (WAS DACRON SAIL RESTORATIO

Post by bruce.em.. » Thu, 03 Mar 1994 02:48:16


12 years is about the average life span in North America with several
qualifications:
1/ Presuming normal use. What I call "dog years" , or about 250 hours per year
of use and U.V. exposure.
2/ One Bermuda or Hawaii trip can equal sevaral Dog Years even though it takes
only weeks.
3/ Boats will often sit for a few years unused, unloved, and unsold. If the
sails are out of the weather (below, or at home) they'll be fine. Rolled on
furler, or under Mainsail cover can still be pretty ratty -- but usually it's
only dirt.
4/ Grab the cloth of the mainsail and genoa below the multiple layers of head
reinforcement and 3" to 6" in from the leech and try to tear it vertically.
Then try along the "dotted line" where the leech tape or tabling is sewn. if
you can't rip the sail it doesn't mean you're out of the woods, but if you can,
you've got some negotiating to do.
5/ Call around to the sailmakers in your area and find one who sounds
responsive. Make a date to bring in your sails and get his/her opinion. If
they're good, you have begun a mutually beneficial relationship which can
greatly enhance your enjoyment of the boat and maybe save you money, or at least heartache.

 
 
 

OLD SAILS (WAS DACRON SAIL RESTORATIO

Post by jmahs.. » Mon, 07 Mar 1994 00:31:13

: 12 years is about the average life span in North America with several
: qualifications:
: 1/ Presuming normal use. What I call "dog years" , or about 250 hours per year
: of use and U.V. exposure.
: 2/ One Bermuda or Hawaii trip can equal sevaral Dog Years even though it takes
: only weeks.
: 3/ Boats will often sit for a few years unused, unloved, and unsold. If the
: sails are out of the weather (below, or at home) they'll be fine. Rolled on
: furler, or under Mainsail cover can still be pretty ratty -- but usually it's
: only dirt.
: 4/ Grab the cloth of the mainsail and genoa below the multiple layers of head
: reinforcement and 3" to 6" in from the leech and try to tear it vertically.
: Then try along the "dotted line" where the leech tape or tabling is sewn. if
: you can't rip the sail it doesn't mean you're out of the woods, but if you can,
: you've got some negotiating to do.
: 5/ Call around to the sailmakers in your area and find one who sounds
: responsive. Make a date to bring in your sails and get his/her opinion. If
: they're good, you have begun a mutually beneficial relationship which can
: greatly enhance your enjoyment of the boat and maybe save you money, or at least heartache
C
I I spoke with someone in Annapolis at Bacons,  a company specializing in
used boating equipment.  She suggested a needle test to evaluate the
integrity of your sail.  Take a compass point (like that used by kids in
school to draw circles) and put it through a single layer of sail cloth
along the leech or luff edge of the sail.  If you hear a popping sound
as
the needle goes through the cloth, it means the sail fibers are
breaking,  and that it may not be worthwhile "restoring".  This is
similar to the test above,  but perhaps a little less drastic since
tearing your sail would obviously force the issue of what to do with
your old sail.

Jim

D
D
D
A
used boating equipment.  .