BOAT/U.S. Newswire: Boat Burglars Look To Spring, Too

BOAT/U.S. Newswire: Boat Burglars Look To Spring, Too

Post by BOAT » Fri, 08 Apr 1994 05:26:05


From the BOAT/U.S. Newswire, 4/6/94: One sure sign of spring is a big increase
in the number of boats on the water. Unfortunately, another is a big increase
in the presence of thieves who like to steal them. Boat theft costs boaters and
their insurance companies almost $50 million a year, according to BOAT/U.S.
(Boat Owners Association of The United States), the nation's largest
organization of recreational boaters. Thieves steal an average of 1,000 boats a
month and the association says the odds of recovering a stolen vessel aren't
good: just one in ten. Now's the time to scrub, polish, paint and generally
spruce up your boat. It's also a good time to think about protecting it from
thieves. BOAT/U.S. offers these tips: 1) don't make your boat an easy target
for theives. Use theft-warning decals, locks and alarm systems. These devices
aren't fool-proof, but they can make boat burglary difficult enough to
discourage many crooks. 2) remove valuable items, such as electronics,
especially if you plan to be away from your boat for a long time. 3) if you
leave your boat on a trailer, use a wheel lock or remove one or more of the
wheels. 4) keep receipts for major equipment purchases and copies of boat
documents, as well as photos of your boat and its equipment, on shore in a
secure plce. 5) if your boat or any of its equipment is stolen or vandalized,
reporting the incident quickly to the local police and your insurance company
may improve the odds of recovery.
-0-
 
 
 

BOAT/U.S. Newswire: Boat Burglars Look To Spring, Too

Post by Dave Littlejo » Sat, 09 Apr 1994 03:01:02



Quote:
> From the BOAT/U.S. Newswire, 4/6/94: One sure sign of spring is a big increase
> in the number of boats on the water. Unfortunately, another is a big increase
> in the presence of thieves who like to steal them. Boat theft costs boaters and
> their insurance companies almost $50 million a year, according to BOAT/U.S.
> (Boat Owners Association of The United States), the nation's largest
> organization of recreational boaters. Thieves steal an average of 1,000 boats a
> month and the association says the odds of recovering a stolen vessel aren't
> good:

What is the breakdown of stolen boats in terms of power vs. sail?  Also,
are smaller boats more likely to be stolen than large boats?  More
information would be helpful.

Dave Littlejohn

 
 
 

BOAT/U.S. Newswire: Boat Burglars Look To Spring, Too

Post by Dan Frenet » Sat, 09 Apr 1994 05:33:23

: From the BOAT/U.S. Newswire, 4/6/94: One sure sign of spring is a big increase
: in the number of boats on the water. Unfortunately, another is a big increase
: in the presence of thieves who like to steal them. Boat theft costs boaters and
: their insurance companies almost $50 million a year, according to BOAT/U.S.
: (Boat Owners Association of The United States), the nation's largest
: organization of recreational boaters. Thieves steal an average of 1,000 boats a
: month and the association says the odds of recovering a stolen vessel aren't
: good: just one in ten. Now's the time to scrub, polish, paint and generally
: -0-

Funny they could talk about low tech stuff to protect it like putting the boat
name on the sides in really large letters.  I know they can paint it but if
the boat is spotted in transit they know this is a path to getting caught.

As my boat is on a trailer I don't leave the licence plate. I cann't
lock my trailer as the Yatch Club boat yard has a right to move the
trailer for major events.  As my tail lights and licence are removed
I'm not the best candidate.  Also the more things you do to the tailer
like paint it loud colors or put the boat name on the trailer will
help key someones memory as the boat passes.

If you don't have sail numbers get them.  They are difficult to remove
completely and sailmakers selling used sails will be all to happy to
collect a reward for finding the sails insted of selling them.

Also joining a fleet assocation could help as if you have a boat with a
strong fleet assocation their knowlege of the boat could help find it.
Most larger boats can't easily be stored just anywhere and it doesn't
take a very large phone tree to get someone to check ever boat yard and
marina in a few day's passage.  People who are active with the same
kind of boat can pick out a boat with your features in a very large
group.  They will know a boat made in a given year with a given stripping
and canvis work in a given area puts the odd of being your boat to
maybe 1 in 10 or less.

The ham network could easily do the same thing.  It's just that if the
boat walks you don't want to wait.  After a couple of weekend they will
have had time to leave the country or repaint the boat.

My point is that there are so many false car alarms that I don't know
that people pay any attention to them anymore.  If the alarms can't
be set off by the wind then you would have to jump and down to create
enough motion not to set it off.
--

AST Research Inc.          (714) 727-8669

 
 
 

BOAT/U.S. Newswire: Boat Burglars Look To Spring, Too

Post by William Clippa » Sat, 16 Apr 1994 05:28:17

Here in Chicago they advertise on the radio a device called "Low-Jack"
(spelling?) which is a hidden radio transmitter used for cars.  If the
car is stolen the transmitter is activated to recovery the stolen car.
The car is recovered so fast the thiefs don't have time to strip it.
I was wondering if this device could be used for a boat?  I'm not sure
what is cost for cars or boats.

Bucky

 
 
 

BOAT/U.S. Newswire: Boat Burglars Look To Spring, Too

Post by Peter W. Me » Sun, 17 Apr 1994 23:30:06

: Here in Chicago they advertise on the radio a device called "Low-Jack"
: (spelling?) which is a hidden radio transmitter used for cars.  If the
: car is stolen the transmitter is activated to recovery the stolen car.
: The car is recovered so fast the thiefs don't have time to strip it.
: I was wondering if this device could be used for a boat?  I'm not sure
: what is cost for cars or boats.

The Lo-Jack (formed from hijack) system depends on having police cars
with special direction finding equipment that can 'tell' the car's
Lo-Jack system to transmit and then home in on it. Unless they have
these direction-finders in patrol boats locally, it might not be
much use. The system is most useful, economically, where there are
a lot (tens of thousands+) of cars in a small area. OTOH, a few
large boats can add up to a lot of cars.        
--

The best navigators are not always certain of where they are,
but they are always aware of their uncertainty. <unknown>