Trailering, Wet Slip, Dry Stack......

Trailering, Wet Slip, Dry Stack......

Post by Wayne. » Sun, 09 Aug 2009 01:02:22


On Fri, 07 Aug 2009 10:35:57 -0400, Gene

Quote:

>I did the wet slip thing until prices went through the roof. I'm tired
>of screwing around with the trailer.... and am seriously considering
>dry storage.

>Anybody have any positive or negative thoughts or experiences on the
>subject of dry storage?

>Here's where I'm considering:
>http://www.southport-marina.com/

Checking out their web site I notice that they have multiple forklifts
and ample staging area.  That's important.   When we were boating out
of Connecticut we kept our old runabout in a drystack most of the time
and it worked out very well, no issues at all.   One thing to consider
is hurricanes.   Here in SWFL many of our local dry stack racks
totally collapsed in Hurricane Charley 5 years ago.   Boats were
crushed of course and owners discovered that not only were they not
covered by the insurance of the stacking operation, but were also
liable for the expense of getting their boats removed from the debris.
 
 
 

Trailering, Wet Slip, Dry Stack......

Post by John Le » Sun, 09 Aug 2009 06:07:09

On Fri, 07 Aug 2009 10:35:57 -0400, Gene

Quote:

>I did the wet slip thing until prices went through the roof. I'm tired
>of screwing around with the trailer.... and am seriously considering
>dry storage.

>Anybody have any positive or negative thoughts or experiences on the
>subject of dry storage?

>Here's where I'm considering:
>http://www.southport-marina.com/

The price is comparable to what I was paying for indoor dry storage of
a 21'er in Deale, MD (about $2100/year). That ended up being too much
money for me, and you'd be paying the same rate for outdoor storage,
unless I missed something. Of course, I'm talking a price of five
years ago. It may be higher now.

The concerns have to do with the boat above yours and what it leaks,
and the skill of the lift operators. Twice my boat suffered damage
from the lift operators. The first time the owner covered the repair
(to the bow rail). The second time, a large gouge in the fiberglass on
the side of the boat, the dealer said the operators denied doing it.
They lied, but I had to pay for the repair.

Ask folks who store their boat outdoors for info on the operators.

That seems like a lot for outdoor storage, but you do what you gotta
do.

--
John H

All decisions, even those made by liberals, are the result of binary thinking.

 
 
 

Trailering, Wet Slip, Dry Stack......

Post by Wizard of Woodstoc » Sun, 09 Aug 2009 09:43:02

On Fri, 07 Aug 2009 10:35:57 -0400, Gene

Quote:

>I did the wet slip thing until prices went through the roof. I'm tired
>of screwing around with the trailer.... and am seriously considering
>dry storage.

>Anybody have any positive or negative thoughts or experiences on the
>subject of dry storage?

>Here's where I'm considering:
>http://www.southport-marina.com/

Yep - did it for two years (racked) and two years on a trailer.

It works well - call ahead and your boat is in the water and waiting.
They will even fuel it for you if necessary. Can't beat it.

Frankly, I like the whole concept and will be doing that with the
Ranger down in SC on Lake Murray.

 
 
 

Trailering, Wet Slip, Dry Stack......

Post by Tim » Sun, 09 Aug 2009 09:47:29


Quote:
> I did the wet slip thing until prices went through the roof. I'm tired
> of screwing around with the trailer.... and am seriously considering
> dry storage.

> Anybody have any positive or negative thoughts or experiences on the
> subject of dry storage?

> Here's where I'm considering:http://www.southport-marina.com/
> --

> Fort Agent 5.00 Build 1171

> "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by
> the things you didn't do than by the ones you did do.
> So, throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor.
> Catch the trade winds in your sails.
> Explore. Dream. Discover." ? - Unknown

> Grady-White Gulfstream, out of Oak Island, NC.

> Homepagehttp://pamandgene.tranquilrefuge.net/boating/the_boat/my_boat.htm

I myself can't really see the advantage of it. I suppose it's because
I like my boats to be home at night.
 
 
 

Trailering, Wet Slip, Dry Stack......

Post by Calif Bil » Sun, 09 Aug 2009 10:13:43



Quote:
> I did the wet slip thing until prices went through the roof. I'm tired
> of screwing around with the trailer.... and am seriously considering
> dry storage.

> Anybody have any positive or negative thoughts or experiences on the
> subject of dry storage?

> Here's where I'm considering:http://www.southport-marina.com/
> --

> Fort Agent 5.00 Build 1171

> "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by
> the things you didn't do than by the ones you did do.
> So, throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor.
> Catch the trade winds in your sails.
> Explore. Dream. Discover." - Unknown

> Grady-White Gulfstream, out of Oak Island, NC.

> Homepagehttp://pamandgene.tranquilrefuge.net/boating/the_boat/my_boat.htm

I myself can't really see the advantage of it. I suppose it's because
I like my boats to be home at night.

Since I launch at a lot of different areas, I could not use stack storage.
Maybe if I lived on a lake, like ShortPants is planning, I might.  But would
more likely have it on either a floating dock or davits at the back of the
house.

 
 
 

Trailering, Wet Slip, Dry Stack......

Post by Wayne. » Sun, 09 Aug 2009 10:31:16

On Fri, 07 Aug 2009 20:49:14 -0400, Gene

Quote:

>Yeah... saw that in spades with Katrina. I'm covered with insurance,
>but my plan would be to trailer back to the house and tie down...

That works but you've got to do it early, day before the storm it's
almost impossible to get anything done.
 
 
 

Trailering, Wet Slip, Dry Stack......

Post by H the » Sun, 09 Aug 2009 10:34:16

Quote:



>> I myself can't really see the advantage of it. I suppose it's because
>> I like my boats to be home at night.

> Your logic is infallible and I defer to your insightful position!

> However, my old Grady is not of the bubble-boat ilk and measures about
> 29 feet overall.... considering pulpit, bracket, and engines. At about
> 8,000+#, tides considered, it is a pill for two "seniors" to put in or
> retrieve with a trailer.

> Like Jerry Clower said.... we gotta have some relief!

I single-handedly launched and retrieved my 25' Parker, which was about
32' long from the pulpit to the bracket. No biggy with a good launch
ramp and modest wind.
 
 
 

Trailering, Wet Slip, Dry Stack......

Post by H the » Sun, 09 Aug 2009 10:55:38

Quote:



>> I single-handedly launched and retrieved my 25' Parker, which was about
>> 32' long.....

> What can I say?  "You the MAN!"

As I said, really good launch ramp, usually no wind or current. Made it
easier than I ever thought it could be.

I simply tied a long line with plenty of slack from the stern to the
dock, and a long line from the bow ring to the front of the trailer. As
soon as the boat slipped into the water, I'd tie the bow line to the
dock and tighten up the stern line, and then go park the trailer and SUV.

When retrieving, I'd use the same lines to tie the boat to the dock,
dunk the trailer a certain distance into the water, untie the stern line
and then pull the boat manually up the trailer with the bow line until
the boat was about 3' from where it was supposed to be. Then I'd attach
the winch strap from the trailer and crank it up the rest of the way.

 
 
 

Trailering, Wet Slip, Dry Stack......

Post by Don Whit » Sun, 09 Aug 2009 21:51:18


Quote:





>>>> I single-handedly launched and retrieved my 25' Parker, which was about
>>>> 32' long.....

>>> What can I say?  "You the MAN!"

>>As I said, really good launch ramp, usually no wind or current. Made it
>>easier than I ever thought it could be.

>>I simply tied a long line with plenty of slack from the stern to the
>>dock, and a long line from the bow ring to the front of the trailer. As
>>soon as the boat slipped into the water, I'd tie the bow line to the
>>dock and tighten up the stern line, and then go park the trailer and SUV.

>>When retrieving, I'd use the same lines to tie the boat to the dock,
>>dunk the trailer a certain distance into the water, untie the stern line
>>and then pull the boat manually up the trailer with the bow line until
>>the boat was about 3' from where it was supposed to be. Then I'd attach
>>the winch strap from the trailer and crank it up the rest of the way.

> Here.... would it were so.....

> I deal with reasonably short ramps with perpetual currents, tides, and
> wind. Large crowds and newbie boaters. During the all to frequent
> tournaments.... mega-crowds.

> My boat is about a foot wider than yours and, although that isn't very
> much, it is affected by the cube of aggravation....  I have to back
> the boat into a dry slip with 3" to spare on each side.

> It might be neat to let somebody else deal with the anxiety....
> --

Do you have a hitch on the *front* of your tow vehicle?
I've heard it's a lot easier to manouver a boat down the ramp when you are
looking ahead.
 
 
 

Trailering, Wet Slip, Dry Stack......

Post by J. Le » Sun, 09 Aug 2009 22:12:04

On Sat, 8 Aug 2009 09:51:18 -0300, "Don White"

Quote:








>>>>> I single-handedly launched and retrieved my 25' Parker, which was about
>>>>> 32' long.....

>>>> What can I say?  "You the MAN!"

>>>As I said, really good launch ramp, usually no wind or current. Made it
>>>easier than I ever thought it could be.

>>>I simply tied a long line with plenty of slack from the stern to the
>>>dock, and a long line from the bow ring to the front of the trailer. As
>>>soon as the boat slipped into the water, I'd tie the bow line to the
>>>dock and tighten up the stern line, and then go park the trailer and SUV.

>>>When retrieving, I'd use the same lines to tie the boat to the dock,
>>>dunk the trailer a certain distance into the water, untie the stern line
>>>and then pull the boat manually up the trailer with the bow line until
>>>the boat was about 3' from where it was supposed to be. Then I'd attach
>>>the winch strap from the trailer and crank it up the rest of the way.

>> Here.... would it were so.....

>> I deal with reasonably short ramps with perpetual currents, tides, and
>> wind. Large crowds and newbie boaters. During the all to frequent
>> tournaments.... mega-crowds.

>> My boat is about a foot wider than yours and, although that isn't very
>> much, it is affected by the cube of aggravation....  I have to back
>> the boat into a dry slip with 3" to spare on each side.

>> It might be neat to let somebody else deal with the anxiety....
>> --

>Do you have a hitch on the *front* of your tow vehicle?
>I've heard it's a lot easier to manouver a boat down the ramp when you are
>looking ahead.

Donnie, Gene has not complained about his inability to back a trailer.
Can you imagine Gene arriving at the launch ramp, unhitching his 29'
Grady, turning the truck around, re-hitching the Grady, and then
'pushing' it down the launch ramp?

Unreal.

Are you sure you're just pretending?
--
John H

All decisions, even those made by liberals, are the result of binary thinking.

 
 
 

Trailering, Wet Slip, Dry Stack......

Post by Don Whit » Sun, 09 Aug 2009 22:30:08


Quote:
> On Sat, 8 Aug 2009 09:51:18 -0300, "Don White"








>>>>>> I single-handedly launched and retrieved my 25' Parker, which was
>>>>>> about
>>>>>> 32' long.....

>>>>> What can I say?  "You the MAN!"

>>>>As I said, really good launch ramp, usually no wind or current. Made it
>>>>easier than I ever thought it could be.

>>>>I simply tied a long line with plenty of slack from the stern to the
>>>>dock, and a long line from the bow ring to the front of the trailer. As
>>>>soon as the boat slipped into the water, I'd tie the bow line to the
>>>>dock and tighten up the stern line, and then go park the trailer and
>>>>SUV.

>>>>When retrieving, I'd use the same lines to tie the boat to the dock,
>>>>dunk the trailer a certain distance into the water, untie the stern line
>>>>and then pull the boat manually up the trailer with the bow line until
>>>>the boat was about 3' from where it was supposed to be. Then I'd attach
>>>>the winch strap from the trailer and crank it up the rest of the way.

>>> Here.... would it were so.....

>>> I deal with reasonably short ramps with perpetual currents, tides, and
>>> wind. Large crowds and newbie boaters. During the all to frequent
>>> tournaments.... mega-crowds.

>>> My boat is about a foot wider than yours and, although that isn't very
>>> much, it is affected by the cube of aggravation....  I have to back
>>> the boat into a dry slip with 3" to spare on each side.

>>> It might be neat to let somebody else deal with the anxiety....
>>> --

>>Do you have a hitch on the *front* of your tow vehicle?
>>I've heard it's a lot easier to manouver a boat down the ramp when you are
>>looking ahead.

> Donnie, Gene has not complained about his inability to back a trailer.
> Can you imagine Gene arriving at the launch ramp, unhitching his 29'
> Grady, turning the truck around, re-hitching the Grady, and then
> 'pushing' it down the launch ramp?

> Unreal.

> Are you sure you're just pretending?
> --
> John H

Why do you keep changing your handle......... forget what you used the last
time?
 
 
 

Trailering, Wet Slip, Dry Stack......

Post by J. Le » Sun, 09 Aug 2009 22:34:04

On Sat, 8 Aug 2009 10:30:08 -0300, "Don White"

Quote:



>> On Sat, 8 Aug 2009 09:51:18 -0300, "Don White"








>>>>>>> I single-handedly launched and retrieved my 25' Parker, which was
>>>>>>> about
>>>>>>> 32' long.....

>>>>>> What can I say?  "You the MAN!"

>>>>>As I said, really good launch ramp, usually no wind or current. Made it
>>>>>easier than I ever thought it could be.

>>>>>I simply tied a long line with plenty of slack from the stern to the
>>>>>dock, and a long line from the bow ring to the front of the trailer. As
>>>>>soon as the boat slipped into the water, I'd tie the bow line to the
>>>>>dock and tighten up the stern line, and then go park the trailer and
>>>>>SUV.

>>>>>When retrieving, I'd use the same lines to tie the boat to the dock,
>>>>>dunk the trailer a certain distance into the water, untie the stern line
>>>>>and then pull the boat manually up the trailer with the bow line until
>>>>>the boat was about 3' from where it was supposed to be. Then I'd attach
>>>>>the winch strap from the trailer and crank it up the rest of the way.

>>>> Here.... would it were so.....

>>>> I deal with reasonably short ramps with perpetual currents, tides, and
>>>> wind. Large crowds and newbie boaters. During the all to frequent
>>>> tournaments.... mega-crowds.

>>>> My boat is about a foot wider than yours and, although that isn't very
>>>> much, it is affected by the cube of aggravation....  I have to back
>>>> the boat into a dry slip with 3" to spare on each side.

>>>> It might be neat to let somebody else deal with the anxiety....
>>>> --

>>>Do you have a hitch on the *front* of your tow vehicle?
>>>I've heard it's a lot easier to manouver a boat down the ramp when you are
>>>looking ahead.

>> Donnie, Gene has not complained about his inability to back a trailer.
>> Can you imagine Gene arriving at the launch ramp, unhitching his 29'
>> Grady, turning the truck around, re-hitching the Grady, and then
>> 'pushing' it down the launch ramp?

>> Unreal.

>> Are you sure you're just pretending?
>> --
>> John H

>Why do you keep changing your handle......... forget what you used the last
>time?

Software.

Now, back to the question.

Are you sure you're just pretending?
--
John H

All decisions, even those made by liberals, are the result of binary thinking.

 
 
 

Trailering, Wet Slip, Dry Stack......

Post by H the » Sun, 09 Aug 2009 22:42:17

Quote:



>> On Sat, 8 Aug 2009 09:51:18 -0300, "Don White"








>>>>>>> I single-handedly launched and retrieved my 25' Parker, which was
>>>>>>> about
>>>>>>> 32' long.....
>>>>>> What can I say?  "You the MAN!"
>>>>> As I said, really good launch ramp, usually no wind or current. Made it
>>>>> easier than I ever thought it could be.

>>>>> I simply tied a long line with plenty of slack from the stern to the
>>>>> dock, and a long line from the bow ring to the front of the trailer. As
>>>>> soon as the boat slipped into the water, I'd tie the bow line to the
>>>>> dock and tighten up the stern line, and then go park the trailer and
>>>>> SUV.

>>>>> When retrieving, I'd use the same lines to tie the boat to the dock,
>>>>> dunk the trailer a certain distance into the water, untie the stern line
>>>>> and then pull the boat manually up the trailer with the bow line until
>>>>> the boat was about 3' from where it was supposed to be. Then I'd attach
>>>>> the winch strap from the trailer and crank it up the rest of the way.
>>>> Here.... would it were so.....

>>>> I deal with reasonably short ramps with perpetual currents, tides, and
>>>> wind. Large crowds and newbie boaters. During the all to frequent
>>>> tournaments.... mega-crowds.

>>>> My boat is about a foot wider than yours and, although that isn't very
>>>> much, it is affected by the cube of aggravation....  I have to back
>>>> the boat into a dry slip with 3" to spare on each side.

>>>> It might be neat to let somebody else deal with the anxiety....
>>>> --

>>> Do you have a hitch on the *front* of your tow vehicle?
>>> I've heard it's a lot easier to manouver a boat down the ramp when you are
>>> looking ahead.

>> Donnie, Gene has not complained about his inability to back a trailer.
>> Can you imagine Gene arriving at the launch ramp, unhitching his 29'
>> Grady, turning the truck around, re-hitching the Grady, and then
>> 'pushing' it down the launch ramp?

>> Unreal.

>> Are you sure you're just pretending?
>> --
>> John H

> Why do you keep changing your handle......... forget what you used the last
> time?

He's trying to emulate his heroes, Reggie***and flajim.

BTW, the dealership in Jax where I bought my boats had hitches on the
fronts and backs of their tow vehicles, for the very reasons you suggest.

BTW, keep me in your thoughts...I have to drive over to Herring's part
of ***ia to get to a shooting competition I entered in a moment of
madness. Actually, though, I apparently shoot a lot better than Herring
golfs.

 
 
 

Trailering, Wet Slip, Dry Stack......

Post by Don Whit » Sun, 09 Aug 2009 23:00:21



snip...

Quote:
> BTW, keep me in your thoughts...I have to drive over to Herring's part of
> ***ia to get to a shooting competition I entered in a moment of
> madness. Actually, though, I apparently shoot a lot better than Herring
> golfs.

I sure hope so...otherwise no one on the range would be safe. ;-)
 
 
 

Trailering, Wet Slip, Dry Stack......

Post by H the » Sun, 09 Aug 2009 23:13:11

Quote:



> snip...
>> BTW, keep me in your thoughts...I have to drive over to Herring's part of
>> ***ia to get to a shooting competition I entered in a moment of
>> madness. Actually, though, I apparently shoot a lot better than Herring
>> golfs.

> I sure hope so...otherwise no one on the range would be safe. ;-)

We Democrats have learned from many of*** Cheney's mistakes...for
example, when firing shotguns, we don't aim at our friends.