New Batteries

New Batteries

Post by MPerlst2 » Mon, 17 Feb 2003 07:58:19


My marine batteries never seem to last longer than 18 months. What is your
experience with the new higher priced newer technology batteries. Are they
worth the double price?
 
 
 

New Batteries

Post by paul wer » Mon, 17 Feb 2003 22:48:48

Make sure you are using Starting batteries for your engine as they have the
proper cranking amps for starting.Do not use deep cycle batteries for start
batteries they are design for light or slow discharges .During the season if
you have your charger constantly plugged in at the dock you must check
battery water at least once a month.During winter months you should take
your batteries home as they tend to freeze sometimes when left in your boat
during winter months.If you check your batteries for freezing they will look
like they have gotten fat on the ends and sides at this point they wont take
a charge and come back and if they do charge up they wont last.Stay away
from diehard batteries.
I have been a boat mechanic for 16 yrs and my experience they dont last


Quote:
> My marine batteries never seem to last longer than 18 months. What is your
> experience with the new higher priced newer technology batteries. Are they
> worth the double price?


 
 
 

New Batteries

Post by Lloyd Sumpte » Tue, 18 Feb 2003 03:11:33

Quote:

> My marine batteries never seem to last longer than 18 months. What is
> your experience with the new higher priced newer technology batteries.
> Are they worth the double price?

  If you're only getting 1 1/2 yrs life out of an "ordinary" battery,
your problem is not the battery. I'd say the fancier batteries are even
more persnickety about charge/discharge rates, so a more expensive one
would probably last even less.

   First, are you using the correct batteries? Deep-cycle for long
discharges (like the "house" battery), starting (or at least combined)
for starting? A few deep discharges will kill a non-deep cycle battery
very quickly.

   Second, how are you charging them? They should be stored fully
charged. I was replacing batteries almost as fast as you when I was using
cheap Canadian Tire chargers (who also had to be replaced every 4-5 yrs).
I changed to a Statpower 40-A automatic smart charger, and my batteries
are now lasting 5 years (ie I bought the charger 5 yrs ago and haven't
replaced my batteries since)

Lloyd Sumpter
"Far Cove" Catalina 36

 
 
 

New Batteries

Post by Rick & Linda Bernar » Tue, 18 Feb 2003 06:28:42

I have used a West Marine charger 10 amp (10 year old technology).  It would
cook my batteries to such a point I would need to add water monthly in the
summer time.  I put a timer to cycle the charger on 1 hr per day and battery
life got much better.

On my new boat it came with a ferroresonant charger and while not having to
add water all the time it hummed.  I finally upgraded to a Statpower and my
water consumption has dropped to almost nothing.  I check them once per
quarter and add little to no water.

Lloyd, have you used the equalization setting on the charger yet?  If yes -
any advice.  I need to equalize my bank of deep cycles and a friend of mine
had problems doing this.


Quote:

> > My marine batteries never seem to last longer than 18 months. What is
> > your experience with the new higher priced newer technology batteries.
> > Are they worth the double price?

>   If you're only getting 1 1/2 yrs life out of an "ordinary" battery,
> your problem is not the battery. I'd say the fancier batteries are even
> more persnickety about charge/discharge rates, so a more expensive one
> would probably last even less.

>    First, are you using the correct batteries? Deep-cycle for long
> discharges (like the "house" battery), starting (or at least combined)
> for starting? A few deep discharges will kill a non-deep cycle battery
> very quickly.

>    Second, how are you charging them? They should be stored fully
> charged. I was replacing batteries almost as fast as you when I was using
> cheap Canadian Tire chargers (who also had to be replaced every 4-5 yrs).
> I changed to a Statpower 40-A automatic smart charger, and my batteries
> are now lasting 5 years (ie I bought the charger 5 yrs ago and haven't
> replaced my batteries since)

> Lloyd Sumpter
> "Far Cove" Catalina 36

 
 
 

New Batteries

Post by Gould 07 » Wed, 19 Feb 2003 05:55:42

Quote:
>Make sure you are using Starting batteries for your engine as they have the
>proper cranking amps for starting.Do not use deep cycle batteries for start
>batteries they are design for light or slow discharges .

Rubbish.

A deep cycle battery, with an adequate amperage, can be used to start an engine
without any harm to the battery.

A "starting battery", on the other hand, should not be used for house loads.
The starting battery is not designed to be deeply discharged and recharged with
the frequency a house or deep cycle battery
will require.

Some of the premium battery companies, like Rolls/Surette, don't even bother to
build a lighter duty "starting" battery.

 
 
 

New Batteries

Post by Messing In Boat » Wed, 19 Feb 2003 08:08:04

I've got a set of marine batteries in a boat I bought in 1998 and they
are good as new, or appear to be, anyway. I never take them out of the
boat (in Minnesota, no less!), but top them with distilled water, charge
them up good with a regular charger and leave a 600 milliamp charger
(maintainer) on them all winter, with the A/B switch set at "both" so it
gets both of them.

I'm afraid I'm going to***it up if i try to reconnect them in the
spring. Decent batteries will not freeze if they are charged. If they
aren't decent, they might freeze, in which case I will have a hell of a
mess.

I think you may have a bad charger that it cooking them. Do you have to
add a lot of water? I don't.

 
 
 

New Batteries

Post by Robert Hutto » Wed, 19 Feb 2003 11:19:12

Partly due to comments found in this NG, I leave the starting and deep
cycle (2) batteries in my boat year round. It is stored in Illinois
(not quite as bad as Minnesota) during the off-season. I charge them
no less than once a month and through the boat's first two winters
there has been no apparent damage.
  I have always assumed I could use one (12 volts) of the deep cycles
to " jump start" should there be a problem w/ the cranking battery.
From an earlier post in this thread, it appears that is the case. I
would appreciate any other comments, especially any "DON'TS about this
practice. Thanks.

--
Robert Hutton

 
 
 

New Batteries

Post by Robert Hutto » Wed, 19 Feb 2003 11:21:39


Subject: Re: New Batteries
Date: Monday, February 17, 2003 8:19 PM

Partly due to comments found in this NG, I leave the starting and deep
cycle (2) batteries in my boat year round. It is stored in Illinois
(not quite as bad as Minnesota) during the off-season. I charge them
no less than once a month and through the boat's first two winters
there has been no apparent damage.
  I have always assumed I could use one (12 volts) of the deep cycles
to " jump start" should there be a problem w/ the cranking battery.
From an earlier post in this thread, it appears that is the case. I
would appreciate any other comments, especially any "DON'TS about this
practice. Thanks.

--
Robert Hutton

--
Robert Hutton

 
 
 

New Batteries

Post by Ray Drak » Thu, 20 Feb 2003 09:49:45

Don't know if it should be done on a regular basis but it worked for me.
Just be mindful of the potential spark.


Quote:

> Subject: Re: New Batteries
> Date: Monday, February 17, 2003 8:19 PM

> Partly due to comments found in this NG, I leave the starting and deep
> cycle (2) batteries in my boat year round. It is stored in Illinois
> (not quite as bad as Minnesota) during the off-season. I charge them
> no less than once a month and through the boat's first two winters
> there has been no apparent damage.
>   I have always assumed I could use one (12 volts) of the deep cycles
> to " jump start" should there be a problem w/ the cranking battery.
> From an earlier post in this thread, it appears that is the case. I
> would appreciate any other comments, especially any "DON'TS about this
> practice. Thanks.

> --
> Robert Hutton

> --
> Robert Hutton


 
 
 

New Batteries

Post by MPerlst2 » Mon, 24 Feb 2003 00:25:41

None of these responses  addressed the original question. Are the new batteries
with the rounded box worth the extra money.
 
 
 

New Batteries

Post by Wayne » Mon, 24 Feb 2003 03:16:37

Can't speak to the new batteries you refer to since I have no
experience with them.  I do know however that if you are
having trouble after 18 months there is something else wrong,
and if you don't find it and correct, new batteries of ANY type
will fail also.  Even inexpensive batteries of average quality
will usually last longer than 18 months if properly maintained and
recharged.  

The most common reason for premature failure is incorrect charging
(voltage too high,  too low, or improperly tapered).  Second most
common is deep discharging a battery that wasn't designed for it,
or repeatedly discharging ANY battery below 50% of capacity.

I'd start by installing a good voltmeter, preferably digital, and
keeping an eye on things.  Normal fully charged  reading for a battery
that is neither charging or discharging is 12.6 volts.  At 50%, under
the same conditions, voltage is 11.6 volts.  It's good practice to
never go lower than that.  Under way and charging, a normal
reading is usually about 13.8 to 14.1 volts. Last but not least,
check your fluid levels regularly and top off with distilled water
only.  If you regularly need to add a lot, the batteries are being
overcharged for some reason.
=================================================    


Quote:
>My marine batteries never seem to last longer than 18 months. What is your
>experience with the new higher priced newer technology batteries. Are they
>worth the double price?

 
 
 

New Batteries

Post by Mark - boatbasin.co » Tue, 25 Feb 2003 05:38:21


Quote:
> None of these responses  addressed the original question. Are the new
batteries
> with the rounded box worth the extra money.

I think they are called Optima batteries.  They are better than wet lead
batteries.  Whether they are worth more that other batteries depends on how
your value your money.
 
 
 

New Batteries

Post by REH » Tue, 25 Feb 2003 17:14:58

          But are the gel batteries better for the casual boater (2-3 hours
a day, 3 times a week)?
  Hold charge
  Don't spill acid
  Lighter
  Mount upside down
  Easy to maintain
  Last for 3 years at optimal performance

      Will be replacing batteries soon. Are GelCells the best option?
Starting/cranking unit? To replace deep cycles?
Concerned less about cost than perfomance (unless $300 per battery). I want
stuff that works when I need it to work Three years from now technology will
have changed; that's why a 3 yr window.
    I'd like to hear some good news about alternatives to the heavy, bulky,
wet lead/acid batteries that I now use .Thanks.

--
Robert Hutton



|

| > None of these responses  addressed the original question. Are the new
| batteries
| > with the rounded box worth the extra money.
|
| I think they are called Optima batteries.  They are better than wet lead
| batteries.  Whether they are worth more that other batteries depends on
how
| your value your money.
|
|

 
 
 

New Batteries

Post by Wayne » Wed, 26 Feb 2003 12:32:39



Quote:
>          But are the gel batteries better for the casual boater (2-3 hours
>a day, 3 times a week)?
>  Hold charge
>  Don't spill acid
>  Lighter
>  Mount upside down
>  Easy to maintain
>  Last for 3 years at optimal performance

>      Will be replacing batteries soon. Are GelCells the best option?
>Starting/cranking unit? To replace deep cycles?
>Concerned less about cost than perfomance (unless $300 per battery). I want
>stuff that works when I need it to work Three years from now technology will
>have changed; that's why a 3 yr window.
>    I'd like to hear some good news about alternatives to the heavy, bulky,
>wet lead/acid batteries that I now use .Thanks.

=========================================
Heavy and bulky are GOOD qualities in a battery.  Unless you
go to NiCads, there's no substitute for lead.  More lead, more
capacity, end of story.  Gel cells and AGMs are good for
sailboats that spend a lot of time healed over but are of much
less value on a power boat in my opinion.  Gel cells in particular
are VERY fussy about charging voltage and easy to damage.
 
 
 

New Batteries

Post by REH » Wed, 26 Feb 2003 13:15:14

Thanks for the info. I'll stay w/ what has been working and let the
alternative technology develop a bit more.

--
Robert Hutton



|
| >          But are the gel batteries better for the casual boater (2-3
hours
| >a day, 3 times a week)?
| >  Hold charge
| >  Don't spill acid
| >  Lighter
| >  Mount upside down
| >  Easy to maintain
| >  Last for 3 years at optimal performance
| >
| >      Will be replacing batteries soon. Are GelCells the best option?
| >Starting/cranking unit? To replace deep cycles?
| >Concerned less about cost than perfomance (unless $300 per battery). I
want
| >stuff that works when I need it to work Three years from now technology
will
| >have changed; that's why a 3 yr window.
| >    I'd like to hear some good news about alternatives to the heavy,
bulky,
| >wet lead/acid batteries that I now use .Thanks.
| =========================================
| Heavy and bulky are GOOD qualities in a battery.  Unless you
| go to NiCads, there's no substitute for lead.  More lead, more
| capacity, end of story.  Gel cells and AGMs are good for
| sailboats that spend a lot of time healed over but are of much
| less value on a power boat in my opinion.  Gel cells in particular
| are VERY fussy about charging voltage and easy to damage.
|