crew overboard help

crew overboard help

Post by offsh.. » Tue, 12 Sep 1995 04:00:00


The National Women's Sailing Association is a sports and advocay group dedicated to increasing the sport of sailing for
women.  Quite often we hold seminars at boat shows about living aboard.  One of the major concerns of women who live
aboard (or are thinking about living aboard) with their spouse is how to get their spouse back on board if something were to
happen to them.  For example... if their husband were to get hit by the boom and fall overboard unconscious.

While we are familiar with some of the theories on how to handle this, we are looking for tips from those may have faced a
similar situation, or advice from experienced cruiser.

Any input will be appreciated.

Lori Carlisle
National Women's Sailing Association
800-566-NWSA

 
 
 

crew overboard help

Post by Robert Harr » Tue, 12 Sep 1995 04:00:00

There is a commercial device called "LifeSling" available at all the
popular marine stores.  It is the best mob retreival device I have seen.  
In my opinion, the most important part of getting a mob back aboard is to
never, and I mean N E V E R  loose sight of the victim.  You cannot take
your eyes off a victim for even a few seconds.  MOB drills are more
important to survival safety than any other single item.  Strobe markers,
dye markers, etc., must be used.  You would be amazed how easy it is to
loose sight of any floating object in any conditions other than
absolutely flat, calm oceans.
-


 
 
 

crew overboard help

Post by Ron Dwell » Tue, 12 Sep 1995 04:00:00

You should contact the Seattle Sailing Foundation which has done
extensive work in this area, including developing the LifeSling. Don't
have their address, but West Marine (who markets the LifeSling) will
direct you.


Quote:
> happen to them.  For example... if their husband were to get hit by the boom and fall overboard unconscious.

> While we are familiar with some of the theories on how to handle this, we are looking for tips from those may have faced a
> similar situation, or advice from experienced cruiser.
> Any input will be appreciated.


 
 
 

crew overboard help

Post by GParki » Tue, 12 Sep 1995 04:00:00

An excellent source on this subject is Lin Pardey, in "The Self-Sufficient
Sailor".  She points out that the only way she felt comfortable was when
she knew she could handle the situation by herself.  Perhaps some practice
for this could include tossing a weighted, buoyant dummy overboard and
recovering it?  Fortunately for us ragpickers, we have access to a crane:
the boom.  Figure out a way to set up a block and tackle so it can be
rigged in a jiffy.  There are other suggestions available, as I am by no
means an expert.
 
 
 

crew overboard help

Post by SECONDWI » Wed, 13 Sep 1995 04:00:00

Contact the owner of Survival Technologies (Florida, in Tampa area, I
think).  They make inflatable life-vests and other inflatable type rescue
systems.  They have been very active in collecting information on real
rescues.  Publish a newsletter that comes out periodically.  Would be a
useful resource.  Sorry I don't have their address or phone number handy.
Check with your local chandelry, they may have tel #.

Steve King

 
 
 

crew overboard help

Post by Steve Weinga » Wed, 13 Sep 1995 04:00:00



Quote:
>There is a commercial device called "LifeSling" available at all the
>popular marine stores.  It is the best mob retreival device I have seen.  
>In my opinion, the most important part of getting a mob back aboard is to
>never, and I mean N E V E R  loose sight of the victim.  You cannot take
>your eyes off a victim for even a few seconds.  MOB drills are more
>important to survival safety than any other single item.  Strobe markers,
>dye markers, etc., must be used.  You would be amazed how easy it is to
>loose sight of any floating object in any conditions other than
>absolutely flat, calm oceans.
>-

While the lifesling is probably the best OB retrival device (we have one), I
have to take exception (I'm being picky), to Bob's statement.  Even more
important than never losing sight of an OB victim is making sure that the
person doesn't become one by going overboard in the first place.

We should put more thought into *preventing* OB situations by using
harnesses, jacklines, and tethers, etc..  You can loose someone OB, it's
much harder on deck.  Many would say that this statement is obvious, but
think about it, how often do you think about keeping someone from getting
into a precarious situation (i.e. *after* the person is up on the bow trying
to get that big gennie down after the wind shifts and the seas picked up, or
before they go forward.  Because once they are up there, they probably won't
come back for a harness).

OTOH I do agree about visibility, after doing a few impromptu hat-OB
retrievals, I can tell you that I would pitch everything in the***pit that
floats, overboard after the person, because we have had 4 people lose sight
of a floating hat in almost flat conditions. A MOB pole with a drogue is a
good idea, it should give good viz even in fairly rough conditions.

Steve

 
 
 

crew overboard help

Post by Scott Truesde » Thu, 14 Sep 1995 04:00:00

In the current "Latitude 38" there is a story about two guys sailing and
one falls overboard. He has a float coat and a saftey harness tethered to
the boat by a 6 foot line.

He still almost died. They had an extremely difficult time hauling him on
board even though he was already connected to the boat. Very sobering to
read.

  --scott

 
 
 

crew overboard help

Post by Steve Weinga » Fri, 15 Sep 1995 04:00:00



Quote:
>In the current "Latitude 38" there is a story about two guys sailing and
>one falls overboard. He has a float coat and a saftey harness tethered to
>the boat by a 6 foot line.

>He still almost died. They had an extremely difficult time hauling him on
>board even though he was already connected to the boat. Very sobering to
>read.

>  --scott

That's why lifesling recommends that you get the lifting tackle with the
lifesling and that you keep it in the lifesling pack to keep it handy on deck.

It uses a halyard to get height, and let's you use a primary winch to get the
POB back aboard.

Steve

 
 
 

crew overboard help

Post by Mike Wooda » Fri, 22 Sep 1995 04:00:00

 >>One of the major concerns of women . . .is how to get their spouse
 >>back on  board if something were to
 >>happen to them.  For example... if their husband were to get hit by
 >>the  boom and fall overboard unconscious.

  -- stuff clipped --

 >While flotation obviously helps the heavily dressed swimmer,  it seems
 >unlikely that anything except an ORC approved harness offers
 >protection to an unconsious sailor headed toward the rail.  Again,
 >this is only speculation and I would appreciate seeing concrete
 >information.
 >George

George, you missed an opportunity to mention just how low on men's priority
list is retrieving the overboard spouse.  Or of mentioning that all
overboard wives are basically unconscious.  Or   OUCH! Alright, dear! I
was just kidding!  (Signing off, George, see ya around.)
--
---
Mike Woodard
all the usual editorial disclaimers apply.  

 
 
 

crew overboard help

Post by John F. Hugh » Wed, 27 Sep 1995 04:00:00

Quote:

>There is a commercial device called "LifeSling" available at all the
>never, and I mean N E V E R  loose sight of the victim.  You cannot take
>your eyes off a victim for even a few seconds.  MOB drills are more
>important to survival safety than any other single item.  Strobe markers,
>dye markers, etc., must be used.  

About those dye markers. Years ago, my dad had one of these that had been
aboard for 7 or 8 years and was wondering how well it worked. He sailed
out of Marion, MA, headed S, and started trailing the marker on a piece
of line. Sailed over to Woods Hole, MA, about 8 miles away, and then got
up on top of a large house and looked back towards Marion. The result?
It looked as if someone had drawn a big dividing line across Buzzards Bay,
in fluourescent green. It was *amazing*. If for no other reason, I think
that these are a good thing in helping to direct search planes/boats to the
right place -- what could be better than a big arrow saying "Look right here,
guys"?

-John