Canoe building help request

Canoe building help request

Post by Ken Wats » Wed, 23 Sep 1998 04:00:00


I am in the process of adding layers of epoxy to the glass I just put
on my canoe( the bottom). I have found what looks like bubbles that
have lifted the glass off the wood. They are less that a quarter in
diameter. What is the fix for this? do I just sand away at them and
recoat with resin?  
 
 
 

Canoe building help request

Post by he.. » Thu, 24 Sep 1998 04:00:00

I had a similar problem/issue.  For me it didn't happen until
glassing the inside when there was no place for the air to go
through the wood.  

My solution was to poke the bubbles with a nail or needle and
use a siringe of epoxy to fill in the bubble.  I got siringes
from a Fleet Farm for livestock.  They had larger needles which
is nice since epoxy is somewhat thick.

Quote:

> I am in the process of adding layers of epoxy to the glass I just put
> on my canoe( the bottom). I have found what looks like bubbles that
> have lifted the glass off the wood. They are less that a quarter in
> diameter. What is the fix for this? do I just sand away at them and
> recoat with resin?  

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Canoe building help request

Post by Geoff Cole » Fri, 25 Sep 1998 04:00:00


was trapped.  (For future work, I expect that it would be a good idea to
start with a warm room an let it cool gradually as the epoxy cools - that
way the air in the wood pores is not expanding and pushing the glass off the
wood as the epoxy cures.)

Back to the current problem, I handled it much the same way as henry except
that I just made a wee slit in the cloth with a sharp utility knife and
squeezed the epoxy in.  Aesthetically, it can leave a bit of a mark.  If you
are being a perfectionist, you could just spot sand the bubbled cloth off
and do a small patch - carefully done it will be all but invisible.

Quote:
-----Original Message-----

Newsgroups: rec.boats.building
Date: Tuesday, September 22, 1998 11:48 AM
Subject: Canoe building help request

>I am in the process of adding layers of epoxy to the glass I just put
>on my canoe( the bottom). I have found what looks like bubbles that
>have lifted the glass off the wood. They are less that a quarter in
>diameter. What is the fix for this? do I just sand away at them and
>recoat with resin?


 
 
 

Canoe building help request

Post by WOODNBOA » Fri, 25 Sep 1998 04:00:00


writes:

Quote:
>I am in the process of adding layers of epoxy to the glass I just put
>on my canoe( the bottom). I have found what looks like bubbles that
>have lifted the glass off the wood. They are less that a quarter in
>diameter. What is the fix for this? do I just sand away at them and
>recoat with resin?  

I'll bet these bubbles are outgassing from the wood.  For your next canoe (I'm
betting this is not your last project!), pre-coat the wood with epoxy, and
allow it to harden at least until it's not tacky.  This will prevent "starving"
the glass.  You will probably see bubbles form in the epoxy from air trapped in
the wood exiting as the epoxy soaks in.  A light sanding will remove these
bubbles.  

Then, when you apply your glass, make sure the time is chosen so that room
temperatures are falling.  This will help prevent outgassing from taking place
under the glass where it can't escape.

For your current problem, if the areas are small (up to 1/2"), I'd just cut the
glass out, feather the edges, and recoat.  The integrity of the envelope should
not be affected much.  If they are larger, or you want to be a bit more anal,
cut a piece of glass at least two inches larger all around than the area you
cut out, epoxy it in place, feather its edges after it has hardened completely,
and continue epoxy coats.

When you have all your epoxy coats in place, I'll bet you won't even be able to
see the patch.

Good luck,
Kirk
"Anything goes...but not everywhere."