The Chesapeake Bay just can't win...

The Chesapeake Bay just can't win...

Post by J Herrin » Wed, 10 Apr 2013 03:04:00


...for losing.

<http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/2013/04/07/a0c2...>

Keep your donations to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation pouring in. Here's the URL in case you've
misplaced it. Also a very nice newsletter. Just click on 'DONATE' at the top to make your quarterly
contribution. Remember...it's DEDUCTIBLE!!

http://www.cbf.org/

Salmonbait

--
Hope you're having a spectacular day!

 
 
 

The Chesapeake Bay just can't win...

Post by BAR » Wed, 10 Apr 2013 20:55:53


Quote:



> >...for losing.

> ><http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/2013/04/07/a0c2...>

> >Keep your donations to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation pouring in. Here's the URL in case you've
> >misplaced it. Also a very nice newsletter. Just click on 'DONATE' at the top to make your quarterly
> >contribution. Remember...it's DEDUCTIBLE!!

> >http://www.cbf.org/

> >Salmonbait

> It sounds like you have a problem with a lack of aquatic vegetation.
> That is what brings down the carbon numbers and boosts DO.
> Have they got a handle on the waste oil that comes down the storm
> drains and the sewer treatment plants yet? They said that used to coat
> the bottom and stifle grass when I was up there. It may be old bad
> problems finally catching up with you.
> Until you get people to stop flushing oil down the toilet and start
> processing street runoff, you are not going to have a clean bay.
> I am really surprised they are not buying old oil for reprocessing.

> Once this becomes a target for "scrappers" a lot of our waste oil
> problems might go away.    

The oil draining thorugh the storm sewers may not be solved yet but, they have painted
"Chesapeake Bay Drainage" on many storm sewer intakes. They haven't been keeping up witht
painting the words lately in Montgomery County.

The once perceived threat to the Chesapeake was the Hydrilla, which actaully turned out to be
a blessing for the bass fishing.

 
 
 

The Chesapeake Bay just can't win...

Post by iBoatere » Thu, 11 Apr 2013 01:31:42



Quote:





> >> >...for losing.

> >> ><http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/2013/04/07/a0c2...>

> >> >Keep your donations to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation pouring in. Here's the URL in case you've
> >> >misplaced it. Also a very nice newsletter. Just click on 'DONATE' at the top to make your quarterly
> >> >contribution. Remember...it's DEDUCTIBLE!!

> >> >http://www.cbf.org/

> >> >Salmonbait

> >> It sounds like you have a problem with a lack of aquatic vegetation.
> >> That is what brings down the carbon numbers and boosts DO.
> >> Have they got a handle on the waste oil that comes down the storm
> >> drains and the sewer treatment plants yet? They said that used to coat
> >> the bottom and stifle grass when I was up there. It may be old bad
> >> problems finally catching up with you.
> >> Until you get people to stop flushing oil down the toilet and start
> >> processing street runoff, you are not going to have a clean bay.
> >> I am really surprised they are not buying old oil for reprocessing.

> >> Once this becomes a target for "scrappers" a lot of our waste oil
> >> problems might go away.    

> >The oil draining thorugh the storm sewers may not be solved yet but, they have painted
> >"Chesapeake Bay Drainage" on many storm sewer intakes. They haven't been keeping up witht
> >painting the words lately in Montgomery County.

> >The once perceived threat to the Chesapeake was the Hydrilla, which actaully turned out to be
> >a blessing for the bass fishing.

> Initially hydrilla may not seem to be a problem but the trouble starts
> when it gets old and dies. It creates a mat of rotting vegetation on
> the bottom that eats the dissolved oxygen releasing the carbon
> dioxide. The CO2 promotes more hydrillia growth and pretty soon you
> have nothing but hydrilla.
> You can end up with stratified water where the top may show a decent
> DO number but the water at the bottom is a dead zone.
> They actually rake the lakes here to thin out this hydrilla mat.
> Natural sea grasses are a far better plant to have. They don't grow as
> fast so they don't create as much biomass to be oxidized when it dies.

> Where is this growing? I did not think it was that salt tolerant. This
> must be a north bay thing

Gee, just to think, if you leave nature alone, ie: natural sea grasses,
things work out in harmony. It's when man thinks he can alter nature
that the problems occur. Look at what happened years ago when man
decided it would be a great idea to drain the Everglades and make the
water flow where they thought it should.

 
 
 

The Chesapeake Bay just can't win...

Post by J Herrin » Thu, 11 Apr 2013 04:03:36

Quote:





>>> >...for losing.

>>> ><http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/2013/04/07/a0c2...>

>>> >Keep your donations to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation pouring in. Here's the URL in case you've
>>> >misplaced it. Also a very nice newsletter. Just click on 'DONATE' at the top to make your quarterly
>>> >contribution. Remember...it's DEDUCTIBLE!!

>>> >http://www.cbf.org/

>>> >Salmonbait

>>> It sounds like you have a problem with a lack of aquatic vegetation.
>>> That is what brings down the carbon numbers and boosts DO.
>>> Have they got a handle on the waste oil that comes down the storm
>>> drains and the sewer treatment plants yet? They said that used to coat
>>> the bottom and stifle grass when I was up there. It may be old bad
>>> problems finally catching up with you.
>>> Until you get people to stop flushing oil down the toilet and start
>>> processing street runoff, you are not going to have a clean bay.
>>> I am really surprised they are not buying old oil for reprocessing.

>>> Once this becomes a target for "scrappers" a lot of our waste oil
>>> problems might go away.    

>>The oil draining thorugh the storm sewers may not be solved yet but, they have painted
>>"Chesapeake Bay Drainage" on many storm sewer intakes. They haven't been keeping up witht
>>painting the words lately in Montgomery County.

>>The once perceived threat to the Chesapeake was the Hydrilla, which actaully turned out to be
>>a blessing for the bass fishing.

>Initially hydrilla may not seem to be a problem but the trouble starts
>when it gets old and dies. It creates a mat of rotting vegetation on
>the bottom that eats the dissolved oxygen releasing the carbon
>dioxide. The CO2 promotes more hydrillia growth and pretty soon you
>have nothing but hydrilla.
>You can end up with stratified water where the top may show a decent
>DO number but the water at the bottom is a dead zone.
>They actually rake the lakes here to thin out this hydrilla mat.
>Natural sea grasses are a far better plant to have. They don't grow as
>fast so they don't create as much biomass to be oxidized when it dies.

>Where is this growing? I did not think it was that salt tolerant. This
>must be a north bay thing

I didn't know it was a bay thing either. It's definitely a Potomac River thing, even stopping up
some of the channels for some marinas.

Salmonbait

--
'Name-calling' - the liberals' last stand.

 
 
 

The Chesapeake Bay just can't win...

Post by BAR » Thu, 11 Apr 2013 08:37:50


Quote:







> > >> >...for losing.

> > >> ><http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/2013/04/07/a0c2...>

> > >> >Keep your donations to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation pouring in. Here's the URL in case you've
> > >> >misplaced it. Also a very nice newsletter. Just click on 'DONATE' at the top to make your quarterly
> > >> >contribution. Remember...it's DEDUCTIBLE!!

> > >> >http://www.cbf.org/

> > >> >Salmonbait

> > >> It sounds like you have a problem with a lack of aquatic vegetation.
> > >> That is what brings down the carbon numbers and boosts DO.
> > >> Have they got a handle on the waste oil that comes down the storm
> > >> drains and the sewer treatment plants yet? They said that used to coat
> > >> the bottom and stifle grass when I was up there. It may be old bad
> > >> problems finally catching up with you.
> > >> Until you get people to stop flushing oil down the toilet and start
> > >> processing street runoff, you are not going to have a clean bay.
> > >> I am really surprised they are not buying old oil for reprocessing.

> > >> Once this becomes a target for "scrappers" a lot of our waste oil
> > >> problems might go away.    

> > >The oil draining thorugh the storm sewers may not be solved yet but, they have painted
> > >"Chesapeake Bay Drainage" on many storm sewer intakes. They haven't been keeping up witht
> > >painting the words lately in Montgomery County.

> > >The once perceived threat to the Chesapeake was the Hydrilla, which actaully turned out to be
> > >a blessing for the bass fishing.

> > Initially hydrilla may not seem to be a problem but the trouble starts
> > when it gets old and dies. It creates a mat of rotting vegetation on
> > the bottom that eats the dissolved oxygen releasing the carbon
> > dioxide. The CO2 promotes more hydrillia growth and pretty soon you
> > have nothing but hydrilla.
> > You can end up with stratified water where the top may show a decent
> > DO number but the water at the bottom is a dead zone.
> > They actually rake the lakes here to thin out this hydrilla mat.
> > Natural sea grasses are a far better plant to have. They don't grow as
> > fast so they don't create as much biomass to be oxidized when it dies.

> > Where is this growing? I did not think it was that salt tolerant. This
> > must be a north bay thing

> Gee, just to think, if you leave nature alone, ie: natural sea grasses,
> things work out in harmony. It's when man thinks he can alter nature
> that the problems occur. Look at what happened years ago when man
> decided it would be a great idea to drain the Everglades and make the
> water flow where they thought it should.

Ocean traversing ships and wooden pallets have been the primary bearers of invasive species.
 
 
 

The Chesapeake Bay just can't win...

Post by J Herrin » Thu, 11 Apr 2013 20:23:44

Quote:


>>Gee, just to think, if you leave nature alone, ie: natural sea grasses,
>>things work out in harmony. It's when man thinks he can alter nature
>>that the problems occur. Look at what happened years ago when man
>>decided it would be a great idea to drain the Everglades and make the
>>water flow where they thought it should.

>It is very hard to look anywhere in the world and see a place where
>man has a responsible water policy. In the case of the bay, the
>biggest problem is the 15 million people in Maryland, ***ia, DC and
>central Pennsylvania who use it for a sewer.

>I was poking around on the "eyes on the bay" web site and the worst
>places are where the various rivers dump into the bay. The Susquehanna
>may be the worst. That is the combined ***from the whole central
>north east. You***in the river in Binghampton New York and it will
>be coming out through Hampton Roads eventually..
>Of course for nutrient load, you have lawn chemicals, sewer treatment
>plants and Frank Purdue.

>I am involved with water quality monitoring here because I saw what
>happened up there.
>They may actually fix the Everglades some day. At least the trend is
>in the right direction.

It's proof that if you put enough big-assed snakes in a swamp, people will stay out of the swamp!

Salmonbait

--
'Name-calling' - the liberals' last stand.

 
 
 

The Chesapeake Bay just can't win...

Post by iBoatere » Thu, 11 Apr 2013 21:48:21



Quote:



> >>Gee, just to think, if you leave nature alone, ie: natural sea grasses,
> >>things work out in harmony. It's when man thinks he can alter nature
> >>that the problems occur. Look at what happened years ago when man
> >>decided it would be a great idea to drain the Everglades and make the
> >>water flow where they thought it should.

> >It is very hard to look anywhere in the world and see a place where
> >man has a responsible water policy. In the case of the bay, the
> >biggest problem is the 15 million people in Maryland, ***ia, DC and
> >central Pennsylvania who use it for a sewer.

> >I was poking around on the "eyes on the bay" web site and the worst
> >places are where the various rivers dump into the bay. The Susquehanna
> >may be the worst. That is the combined ***from the whole central
> >north east. You***in the river in Binghampton New York and it will
> >be coming out through Hampton Roads eventually..
> >Of course for nutrient load, you have lawn chemicals, sewer treatment
> >plants and Frank Purdue.

> >I am involved with water quality monitoring here because I saw what
> >happened up there.
> >They may actually fix the Everglades some day. At least the trend is
> >in the right direction.

> It's proof that if you put enough big-assed snakes in a swamp, people will stay out of the swamp!

> Salmonbait

That's about the stupidest thing you've come up with since the
polymer/alloy idiocy.