walker bay dinghys

walker bay dinghys

Post by Cory & Margare » Sat, 07 Jul 2001 09:11:50


I was looking at the walker bay 8 foot sailing dinghy recently and they
look like an interesting little boat.
I was considering buying one to use as a tender and a recreational
sailboat when on the hook. We stern tie a fair amount and since
barnacles and inflatables don't seem to get along too well ( just look
at the number of patches on my old achilles) I thought  I might look at
getting a hard dinghy. The walker's are fairly inexpensive and seem as
if they would be pretty tough to damage.
Does anybody have any experience with the walkers.....how well do they
tow ,row, handle an outboard ,sail etc.

Any info would be greatly appreciated.
Please e-mail replies

 
 
 

walker bay dinghys

Post by stephen.sumne » Sat, 07 Jul 2001 17:20:58

They are very tippy little boats


Quote:
> I was looking at the walker bay 8 foot sailing dinghy recently and they
> look like an interesting little boat.
> I was considering buying one to use as a tender and a recreational
> sailboat when on the hook. We stern tie a fair amount and since
> barnacles and inflatables don't seem to get along too well ( just look
> at the number of patches on my old achilles) I thought  I might look at
> getting a hard dinghy. The walker's are fairly inexpensive and seem as
> if they would be pretty tough to damage.
> Does anybody have any experience with the walkers.....how well do they
> tow ,row, handle an outboard ,sail etc.

> Any info would be greatly appreciated.
> Please e-mail replies


 
 
 

walker bay dinghys

Post by Viviann Kueh » Sun, 08 Jul 2001 00:32:43

I bought one when they first came out and love it. I think all boats should
be made out of recycled milk jugs. It is very light, I can lift it on deck
by my self, relatively impervious to barnacles, they will wear through the
hull if you just drag it over the beach however. Shop around, West Marine
sells them for $400 we bought ours from a local sporting goods for about
$325 and it turned out COSTCO had them for about $280 for a time. Good luck
Todd Miller
----------

Quote:

>I was looking at the walker bay 8 foot sailing dinghy recently and they
>look like an interesting little boat.
>I was considering buying one to use as a tender and a recreational
>sailboat when on the hook. We stern tie a fair amount and since
>barnacles and inflatables don't seem to get along too well ( just look
>at the number of patches on my old achilles) I thought  I might look at
>getting a hard dinghy. The walker's are fairly inexpensive and seem as
>if they would be pretty tough to damage.
>Does anybody have any experience with the walkers.....how well do they
>tow ,row, handle an outboard ,sail etc.

>Any info would be greatly appreciated.
>Please e-mail replies


 
 
 

walker bay dinghys

Post by ec Roberts (Po » Sat, 07 Jul 2001 22:32:45

On Fri, 6 Jul 2001 09:20:58 +0100, "stephen.sumner"

Quote:

>They are very tippy little boats

I stand up and fish from my WB 8 all the time. While it is a might more "tippy"
than a pontoon or deep vee, it does right well for me, and gives my El Camino
that added touch of "class" as I drive out to the ponds and rivers. Paid $300
(US) for it a year and 1/2 ago. I've beat it about the rocks and concrete launch
pads and still have but a few scratches. I now wish I'd waited for the 10
footer, as I can't haul my 220lb son with me and all my gear.  

Quote:


>> I was looking at the walker bay 8 foot sailing dinghy recently and they
>> look like an interesting little boat.
>> I was considering buying one to use as a tender and a recreational
>> sailboat when on the hook. We stern tie a fair amount and since
>> barnacles and inflatables don't seem to get along too well ( just look
>> at the number of patches on my old achilles) I thought  I might look at
>> getting a hard dinghy. The walker's are fairly inexpensive and seem as
>> if they would be pretty tough to damage.
>> Does anybody have any experience with the walkers.....how well do they
>> tow ,row, handle an outboard ,sail etc.

>> Any info would be greatly appreciated.
>> Please e-mail replies

--
Pops (ec Roberts)
Armed and Safe(tm)

armedandsafe.org

The right of the people to keep and bear arms
shall not be infringed; a well armed, and well
regulated militia being the best security of a
free country: but no person religiously
scrupulous of bearing arms, shall be compelled
to render military service in person.
James Madison, in speech proposing Bill of Rights,
June 8, 1789

Environmental fanatics' creed:
    "Though every prospect pleases,
         And only man is vile:"
(Reginald Heber - 1819)

 
 
 

walker bay dinghys

Post by Lloyd Sumpte » Tue, 10 Jul 2001 03:18:03

Quote:

> I was looking at the walker bay 8 foot sailing dinghy recently and they
> look like an interesting little boat.
> I was considering buying one to use as a tender and a recreational
> sailboat when on the hook. We stern tie a fair amount and since
> barnacles and inflatables don't seem to get along too well ( just look
> at the number of patches on my old achilles) I thought  I might look at
> getting a hard dinghy. The walker's are fairly inexpensive and seem as
> if they would be pretty tough to damage.
> Does anybody have any experience with the walkers.....how well do they
> tow ,row, handle an outboard ,sail etc.

> Any info would be greatly appreciated.
> Please e-mail replies

   I'll add my name to the list of Satisfied Owners.

   It rows well, it's light (I can just throw it off the foredeck to launch
it!), it's durable. I does seem a bit "tippy", I think mainly because it's
so light: it "skitters" around. I noticed that in rowing as well - my old
fibreglass "Lil Admiral" took more to get started, then glided along
smoothly. The Walker Bay goes fast Real Easy, but slows down more quickly
as well. Tracks very well, though.

   "Officially" it's supposed to carry 2 persons max, but it doesn't seem
overloaded at all with three (myself (200lb) and two 140-lb women -
actually the women themselves were lighter, but they always seem be be
carrying baggage...).

   I added a Minn Kota electric motor to the mix, with a tiny Canadian Tire
battery, and the combination is awesome. Light, inexpensive, no gas, no
sound, kicks me along for an hour at 3 knots or all afternoon at 2 (I can
row at 3 for maybe 1 minute!). It would be more with a bigger battery.

   I haven't added the sailkit yet, but my builder's eye says the
daggerboard is WAY too far aft for it to sail well. I don't know if the 10
sails any better.

   I would also look seriously at the new Walker Bay 10. The 8 IS a bit
small, and the 10 seems to be "just right".

Lloyd Sumpter
"Far Cove" Cataina 36 - c/w "Near Cove" Walker Bay 8

 
 
 

walker bay dinghys

Post by hkra.. » Tue, 10 Jul 2001 06:00:37

Quote:


> > I was looking at the walker bay 8 foot sailing dinghy recently and they
> > look like an interesting little boat.
> > I was considering buying one to use as a tender and a recreational
> > sailboat when on the hook. We stern tie a fair amount and since
> > barnacles and inflatables don't seem to get along too well ( just look
> > at the number of patches on my old achilles) I thought  I might look at
> > getting a hard dinghy. The walker's are fairly inexpensive and seem as
> > if they would be pretty tough to damage.
> > Does anybody have any experience with the walkers.....how well do they
> > tow ,row, handle an outboard ,sail etc.

> > Any info would be greatly appreciated.
> > Please e-mail replies

>    I'll add my name to the list of Satisfied Owners.

>    It rows well, it's light (I can just throw it off the foredeck to launch
> it!), it's durable. I does seem a bit "tippy", I think mainly because it's
> so light: it "skitters" around. I noticed that in rowing as well - my old
> fibreglass "Lil Admiral" took more to get started, then glided along
> smoothly. The Walker Bay goes fast Real Easy, but slows down more quickly
> as well. Tracks very well, though.

>    "Officially" it's supposed to carry 2 persons max, but it doesn't seem
> overloaded at all with three (myself (200lb) and two 140-lb women -
> actually the women themselves were lighter, but they always seem be be
> carrying baggage...).

>    I added a Minn Kota electric motor to the mix, with a tiny Canadian Tire
> battery, and the combination is awesome. Light, inexpensive, no gas, no
> sound, kicks me along for an hour at 3 knots or all afternoon at 2 (I can
> row at 3 for maybe 1 minute!). It would be more with a bigger battery.

>    I haven't added the sailkit yet, but my builder's eye says the
> daggerboard is WAY too far aft for it to sail well. I don't know if the 10
> sails any better.

>    I would also look seriously at the new Walker Bay 10. The 8 IS a bit
> small, and the 10 seems to be "just right".

> Lloyd Sumpter
> "Far Cove" Cataina 36 - c/w "Near Cove" Walker Bay 8

Dyer Dink is the answer.
--
Harry Krause
------------

It takes both rain and sunshine to make a rainbow

 
 
 

walker bay dinghys

Post by Jeff » Wed, 11 Jul 2001 07:02:59

Quote:

> They are very tippy little boats

So are most other boats of that general configuration, such as Fatty Knees
dinghies, etc.  You get used to it.

Jeff

 
 
 

walker bay dinghys

Post by Cory & Margare » Wed, 11 Jul 2001 09:17:54

Thanks Lloyd
After doing some looking around i found a few sources of fiberglass dinghys of
approx. the same dimensions for about half the price...maybe i'll modify and
add a sail kit ?.
Thanks again
Cory West
S/V Velleity
Truant  33
Quote:


> > I was looking at the walker bay 8 foot sailing dinghy recently and they
> > look like an interesting little boat.
> > I was considering buying one to use as a tender and a recreational
> > sailboat when on the hook. We stern tie a fair amount and since
> > barnacles and inflatables don't seem to get along too well ( just look
> > at the number of patches on my old achilles) I thought  I might look at
> > getting a hard dinghy. The walker's are fairly inexpensive and seem as
> > if they would be pretty tough to damage.
> > Does anybody have any experience with the walkers.....how well do they
> > tow ,row, handle an outboard ,sail etc.

> > Any info would be greatly appreciated.
> > Please e-mail replies

>    I'll add my name to the list of Satisfied Owners.

>    It rows well, it's light (I can just throw it off the foredeck to launch
> it!), it's durable. I does seem a bit "tippy", I think mainly because it's
> so light: it "skitters" around. I noticed that in rowing as well - my old
> fibreglass "Lil Admiral" took more to get started, then glided along
> smoothly. The Walker Bay goes fast Real Easy, but slows down more quickly
> as well. Tracks very well, though.

>    "Officially" it's supposed to carry 2 persons max, but it doesn't seem
> overloaded at all with three (myself (200lb) and two 140-lb women -
> actually the women themselves were lighter, but they always seem be be
> carrying baggage...).

>    I added a Minn Kota electric motor to the mix, with a tiny Canadian Tire
> battery, and the combination is awesome. Light, inexpensive, no gas, no
> sound, kicks me along for an hour at 3 knots or all afternoon at 2 (I can
> row at 3 for maybe 1 minute!). It would be more with a bigger battery.

>    I haven't added the sailkit yet, but my builder's eye says the
> daggerboard is WAY too far aft for it to sail well. I don't know if the 10
> sails any better.

>    I would also look seriously at the new Walker Bay 10. The 8 IS a bit
> small, and the 10 seems to be "just right".

> Lloyd Sumpter
> "Far Cove" Cataina 36 - c/w "Near Cove" Walker Bay 8

 
 
 

walker bay dinghys

Post by Lloyd Sumpte » Wed, 11 Jul 2001 23:33:06

Quote:


>> They are very tippy little boats

> So are most other boats of that general configuration, such as Fatty Knees
> dinghies, etc.  You get used to it.

   As I said, I think one thing that contributes to the "tippy" feeling in
the Walker Bays is their lightness. Perhaps epoxying in a bunch of fishing
weights into the "keel" would help - one could easily add 30-40 lb to it
and still have a light boat, and the weight right at the bottom should give
lots of stability.

Lloyd Sumpter
"Near Cove" Walker Bay 8

 
 
 

walker bay dinghys

Post by Jeff » Thu, 12 Jul 2001 09:27:20

Quote:



> >> They are very tippy little boats

> > So are most other boats of that general configuration, such as Fatty
Knees
> > dinghies, etc.  You get used to it.

>    As I said, I think one thing that contributes to the "tippy" feeling in
> the Walker Bays is their lightness. Perhaps epoxying in a bunch of fishing
> weights into the "keel" would help - one could easily add 30-40 lb to it
> and still have a light boat, and the weight right at the bottom should
give
> lots of stability.

Do you think that is really a good idea?  My friend claims his becomes less
and less usable with added load.  He and his wife can almost not sail the
boat at all.  It does acceptably well with just him aboard.  Not sure I'd
add ballast indiscriminately.

Jeff