Softball Pitching Arc Rules

Softball Pitching Arc Rules

Post by Jeff Cruci » Fri, 05 Jan 1996 04:00:00


Hello everybody,
Good group!

Growing up in Milwaukee, all I remember is 6' to 12' arc where the ump
called strikes and hitting the plate was an automatic ball. When I came to
school in Madison (go Badgers!) I found the city leagues use a mat to call
strikes. The Mat sits behind the plate and makes a big rectangle about 3
feet deep and <width of the plate> wide. Anything that hits the mat or
plate is a strike. Then I started playing in leagues in the greater
Madison area and found that they use the mat and there is no upper arc
rule. This was completely foreign to me. In fact at one point I vowed to
never play that unlimited arc stuff again. But not that i have some years
under my belt, I actually prefer it. Makes the 6' to 12' stuff easier to
hit.

So the question is, what other kinds of pitching rules are out there?
I've heard of 6 to 12
unlimited
3' to 10' where the pitch has to rise 3 feet above the point where it was
released. Never played it.
WHats the rules on that 16" stuff?

Whats the feeling on the mat to call strikes?
Personally, i like it. Eliminates the "ump makes a bad strike call with 2
on in the bottom of the 7th" fiasco which has plauged us all in the past.
Jeff

 
 
 

Softball Pitching Arc Rules

Post by Thomas Isabe » Sat, 06 Jan 1996 04:00:00

Quote:

>WHats the rules on that 16" stuff?
>Whats the feeling on the mat to call strikes?
>Personally, i like it. Eliminates the "ump makes a bad strike call with 2
>on in the bottom of the 7th" fiasco which has plauged us all in the past.
>Jeff

I too grew up in Milwaukee playing "standard" 12" ball with a 6' to 12' arc
limit, but since coming to grad school here in Chicago I've had to learn to
play the 16" game.  In the 3+ years I've been here, I've played in 3 different
leagues in 3 different areas of town (2 in the city, 1 in the 'burbs) and in
each case, the pitching rules were the same:  no arc limits whatsoever and
strikes called by where the ball hits.  No mats are used, the umps go by if
the ball hits in the so called "well" behind the plate - about the same area
as if a mat is used.  In addition, a ball hitting the plate is a ball, unless
it hits the "black" - the rim around the plate along the back edges of the
plate.  It is then a strike.  The real unusual thing about pitching in 16" is
that the pitcher only needs to start with one foot on the ***.  From there
he may take one step (often a lunging stride) in any direction except toward
the plate.  Thus it is not unusual to have a pitcher pitch at you from many
different angles during a single at bat.  Many of the best pitchers will chang
angle depending on strike count and if they are ahead they will "make it rain"
- pitch the ball so it comes down nearly vertically at the batter, more often
than not for a strike.  It really makes batting in 16" a chore.

As for other rules of 16" for those of you who have never heard of it- the
major changes are:

no gloves are allowed whatsoever in the field.  The ball starts hard like a
12" ball but quickly softens as the game progresses.  Most leagues put a new
ball into play for the bottom of the 4th (in a 7 inning game).

10 players are again used in the field, but instead of playing 4 outfielders,
most teams play 5 infielders, playing a "short center" directly behind 2nd
base

leading off is legal, but the runner may only advance if played on by the
pitcher

few fields have fences.  Power is really not much a part of the 16" game.
Better teams rely on team speed - hit and run and the like - to advance
runners, having the batter try to slap the ball into play

bats used seem to vary by league.  In general, heavy wooden bats are employed
as the usual 12" aluminum bat will not hit the large, soft 16" ball well.  On
teams with lots of speed to burn however, the smaller fast guys will use the
aluminum bats to put the ball in play and beat out a throw (or if they can get
the ball to the outfield, stretch a routine single into 2 bases or more.)

Its a different game, but a lot of fun once you get used to it.  Much more
strategy involved rather than just "crush the ball" like in so many 12"
leagues.

Anything major I missed anyone else from Chicago??????

Tom Isabell
--
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Softball Pitching Arc Rules

Post by Kevin T. Nem » Sat, 06 Jan 1996 04:00:00

: Well, in Schofield, WI (10 points if you know where that is...) they had the
: mat, and the same rules as you mentioned above, w/ one exception.  If it
: hit the home plate, it was an out.  Balls that hit the mat were a strike.
: In Texas they use the 6' to 12', plate is a ball, Umps call balls, strikes,
: etc.
: FYI
: Perry

Well even further north, we played the plate and the mat were strikes and
the 3 - 10 from the point of the release rule.  That was in Sayner WI,
(actually the teams were from all over Vilas County).  And yes I do know
where Schofield is:)

Kevin

 
 
 

Softball Pitching Arc Rules

Post by Al Dor » Sun, 07 Jan 1996 04:00:00

Quote:

>Hello everybody,
>Good group!
>Growing up in Milwaukee, all I remember is 6' to 12' arc where the ump
>called strikes and hitting the plate was an automatic ball. When I came to
>school in Madison (go Badgers!) I found the city leagues use a mat to call
>strikes. The Mat sits behind the plate and makes a big rectangle about 3
>f

This seems like a lively topic of discussion.

Could I please make a suggestion on this posting and many like it?

PLEASE identify if you are talking about fastpitch, slowpitch,
modified, etc.

Some of us are having a hard time figuring out what sport is being
discussed.

MANY THANKS!

Al Doran

 
 
 

Softball Pitching Arc Rules

Post by Tim Irv » Sun, 07 Jan 1996 04:00:00

: So the question is, what other kinds of pitching rules are out there?
: I've heard of 6 to 12

This is standard ASA.

: unlimited

Tried this one.  Very interesting.  I played against someone who could
throw 20'-25' arc for strikes, and I was lucky to get an infield single
on my fourth and final at bat.

: 3' to 10' where the pitch has to rise 3 feet above the point where it was
: released. Never played it.

Standard USSSA rule.  They also have more liberal rules regarding what
motions a pitcher can make on the mound.

: Whats the feeling on the mat to call strikes?

Well, that may be true, but there are still questions about arc (a 20
footer lands on a mat and strikes you out.  Who has the authority to
declare it an illegal pitch?).  A high-arc pitch which catches the back
edge of the mat was probably too deep.

: Personally, i like it. Eliminates the "ump makes a bad strike call with 2
: on in the bottom of the 7th" fiasco which has plauged us all in the past.

It has merits, and is certainly the "preferred method" for casual
leagues which have no umpire, but for all their faults, I'd still
prefer to have an ump.

--

Geek, Husband, System Administrator, Softball Maniac, Numismatist, et cetera
"The net.persona formerly known as ziggy29"
WWW ==>  http://www.mathcs.sjsu.edu/student/irvi2187/

 
 
 

Softball Pitching Arc Rules

Post by Robert Havila » Mon, 08 Jan 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

>Hello everybody,
>Good group!

>So the question is, what other kinds of pitching rules are out there?
>I've heard of 6 to 12

This is used in ASA and USSSA.

Quote:
>unlimited

This is how all leagues used to be, so I was told.  I kow some guys
that played in the fifties and they said that they didn't have an arc
rule.

Quote:
>3' to 10' where the pitch has to rise 3 feet above the point where it was
>released. Never played it.

This is the rule that the ISA uses.  The Independant Softball
Association is huge in the south.  They have copyrighted the
basestealing rule.  Alot of the Super Majors are playing it.

All you have to do is have one foot on the plate and you can use any
motion.  I know alot of guys that pitch through their legs for
strikes.  One guy leans way over towards third to pitch.  Its a fun
league.  Based in Shelbyville, TN.

Quote:
>WHats the rules on that 16" stuff?

?

Quote:
>Whats the feeling on the mat to call strikes?
>Personally, i like it. Eliminates the "ump makes a bad strike call with 2
>on in the bottom of the 7th" fiasco which has plauged us all in the past.
>Jeff

We use it in one-pitch tournaments.  It protects the batter from the
ump.

I've also  played one modified tournament.  I believe it uses no arc
but you can't windup like fastpitch.  I think all you can do is pull
your arm back and then pitch.

Robert Haviland

And lefthanders shall inherit the Earth.

 
 
 

Softball Pitching Arc Rules

Post by Robert Py » Tue, 09 Jan 1996 04:00:00


: >WHats the rules on that 16" stuff?

: As for other rules of 16" for those of you who have never heard of it- the
: major changes are:

: no gloves are allowed whatsoever in the field.  The ball starts hard like a
: 12" ball but quickly softens as the game progresses.  Most leagues put a new
: ball into play for the bottom of the 4th (in a 7 inning game).

: 10 players are again used in the field, but instead of playing 4 outfielders,
: most teams play 5 infielders, playing a "short center" directly behind 2nd
: base

: leading off is legal, but the runner may only advance if played on by the
: pitcher

: few fields have fences.  Power is really not much a part of the 16" game.
: Better teams rely on team speed - hit and run and the like - to advance
: runners, having the batter try to slap the ball into play

: bats used seem to vary by league.  In general, heavy wooden bats are employed
: as the usual 12" aluminum bat will not hit the large, soft 16" ball well.  On
: teams with lots of speed to burn however, the smaller fast guys will use the
: aluminum bats to put the ball in play and beat out a throw (or if they can get
: the ball to the outfield, stretch a routine single into 2 bases or more.)

: Its a different game, but a lot of fun once you get used to it.  Much more
: strategy involved rather than just "crush the ball" like in so many 12"
: leagues.

: Anything major I missed anyone else from Chicago??????

I grew up in Chicago playing 16", then moved to Boston and Michigan (12"
land) and missed the 16" stuff.  Now I have moved to England and miss
any sort of softball!

The other comment I would make in 16"differences is that it really puts
the pressure on clean infield play.  As a third baseman, I found that
you don't have a chance to throw that medicine ball across the diamond
fast enough if you bobble at all.  Generally in 12" you have a chance to
knock the ball down and still make a play, but the slower throwing speed
of the 16" ball makes for better infielders.

: Tom Isabell
: --

Rob Pyle
looking at his two crooked fingers (ahhh, I miss 16"!)

 
 
 

Softball Pitching Arc Rules

Post by Russ Harris » Tue, 09 Jan 1996 04:00:00


says...

Quote:
>I've also  played one modified tournament.  I believe it uses no arc
>but you can't windup like fastpitch.  I think all you can do is pull
>your arm back and then pitch.

I used to play modified in the Port Huron, Mich. area in the 70's. It
used to be the most popular form of softball along with
fastpitch(windmill). Noe its almost all slow pitch and their variations.

 The rules in modified were the same as fastpitch (9 players, stealing)
with the exception of the pitcher. Rules for pitchers seem to slightly
change each year, but basically you could not go above the shoulder on
the backswing and no more than 2 inches from the thigh on the forward
motion.

 I pitched for about 3 years and have pitched some fastpitch. I found
that modified is the hardest on the body (hip and legs).

 I played against some amazing older pitchers that could make the ball do
incredible stuff.

Russ Harrison

 
 
 

Softball Pitching Arc Rules

Post by Tim Irv » Wed, 10 Jan 1996 04:00:00

: I grew up in Chicago playing 16", then moved to Boston and Michigan (12"
: land) and missed the 16" stuff.  Now I have moved to England and miss
: any sort of softball!

We played with a 16" "mush ball" in high school P.E., and no one wore
any gloves.  It was an interesting game.

: The other comment I would make in 16"differences is that it really puts
: the pressure on clean infield play.  As a third baseman, I found that
: you don't have a chance to throw that medicine ball across the diamond
: fast enough if you bobble at all.  Generally in 12" you have a chance to
: knock the ball down and still make a play, but the slower throwing speed
: of the 16" ball makes for better infielders.

I played 3B in that game as well.  With a bigger, heavier ball and a 1B
who isn't wearing a glove, you do have to alter your throwing motion and
technique a bit--which is why I've avoided 16" these days; I don't want
to***up my current softball infielding instincts and techniques.

One thing I learned about 16" ball is that a lot of people liked to
smash the thing right at the third baseman...

--

Geek, Husband, System Administrator, Softball Maniac, Numismatist, et cetera
"The net.persona formerly known as ziggy29"
WWW ==>  http://SportToday.org/