Catching (help needed)

Catching (help needed)

Post by CivisEa » Sat, 10 Feb 1996 04:00:00


Most US coaches recite the mantra, "Two hands for beginners" because they
heard it a lot as kids themselves.  The players never want to hear it,
because
they are not beginners as soon as they reach pre-pubesent knowledge of all
things.  Even if they never saw a ball and thought a diamond was
forever...
IMHO, the correct way is two hands because you need to make a play, not
just
look good (or dumb, when it bounces out, ever so o  o   o  slowly).. For
intermediate players, the task is to reach in for the ball, not toss it
into the throwing hand from the glove.  That produces an error I like to
see in infielders.  
It shows they're working on quick hands, but need to work on the
"glovework".
Watch a Division 1 F6or F4 trying to turn a pivot dbl play--the glove to
the hand
to the air is one motion.  Can't even come close if any delay.  Same in
the outfield
I think.  Everything has to be fast in fastpitch.

--Lee Humes, Woodland, Ca.

 
 
 

Catching (help needed)

Post by Jaime L. Nato » Mon, 12 Feb 1996 04:00:00

: I was brought up with the notion of letting the glove pocket do all the work.  
: I catch with the pocket perpendicular to the ball trajectory, the kid does too
: with no problems.  But.... I noticed that in the girls senior game that we
: watched last weekend that the catching method was to scoop the ball with both
: hands.  This is also taught at the kid's primary school.  Yuck!

: Is this an accepted practice or what?

: Catching with the glove alone also gives a much greater stretch distance for
: those almost-out-of-reach shots too.

: Which way is correct?

When I first started playing, I was always taught to catch with the glove
perpendicular (sideways, almost) to the trajectory of the ball.  The only
difference was that I was also taught to catch with two hands.  Granted,
catching with the glove alone is a great way to get hard-to-catch throws,
but when you "scoop" the ball with two hand, you cut back on the chance of
the ball popping out and you also have your throwing hand there to make
the next play.  Very handy for shortstop and second ba*** who have to
field/catch/turn double plays.

Jaime L. Natoli
Eckerd College
St. Petersburg, Florida